Josh Turner Q&A: Country star has faith, several hit songs, and no idea who Rick Astley is


Josh Turner is the youngest male member of the Grand Ole Opry, and why wouldn’t he be? The guy’s sold millions of records and scored two No. 1 country hits (“Your Man” and “Would You Go with Me”), and his baritone could melt paint off a Buick. On the eve of his fourth album, Haywire — whose first single, “Why Don’t We Just Dance,” is on its way to the top of the charts, too — we interrupted Turner’s tour rehearsals to chat, and apparently ask a real stumper of a first question.

Entertainment Weekly: Are you going to be offended if I sometimes think of you as country music’s Rick Astley?
Josh Turner: Country music’s what now?

Country music’s Rick Astley.
I don’t know who that is. [laughs]

You remember Rick Astley!
No, I don’t.

[Lamely sings] “Never gonna give you up, never gonna let you down…” He was a pop singer in the 1980s. Are you too young to remember?
I’m not too young, I just didn’t listen to pop music in the ‘80s.

He was this young, good looking guy, but he had this crazy deep voice that sounded like it was coming out of someone else entirely. You remind me of him.
I’ll take it as a compliment.

You should! Why did you decide to lead with “Why Don’t We Just Dance” off this album?
I feel like it’s a great message for people to hear. It legitimately asks the question, Why don’t we just turn off the TV and forget about all this bad news going on in the world, and dance? Why don’t we just have some fun? That’s what this record’s all about.

Do you consider that sort of escapism part of your responsibility as an artist?
Indirectly. I feel like if I tried to assume that responsibility, I’d end up a walking disaster. I have a mission that allows me to make music. I can make music that allows people to tap their toes and clap their hands and get up and dance if they want to. My job is to use my platform in a positive way, and make a difference in people’s lives.

What’s your favorite track that you wrote for the new record?
Probably “The Answer.” It’s a song that really has a lot of power, and a lot of soul, and a song that really evolved from its original version. When I first wrote it, it sounded like a sad Vern Gosdin song, melodically. I think it’s one of the best songs I’ve written.

I love that you just threw out a Vern Gosdin reference. You seem dedicated to a relatively traditional sound, even as much of your industry favors a poppier perspective.
I’ve never been into pop music. I grew up on traditional country music, and bluegrass, and gospel, and I’ve started to become a fan of contemporary and old-school R&B. I’ve always gravitated towards those artists that have grit and texture, and know exactly who they are. They’re not following a trend, they just stick to what they feel is right.

What was the first album you ever bought with your own money?
Randy Travis, Storms of Life. He was the man. Still is.

What’s the poppiest record you ever bought?
I definitely listened to some Michael Jackson growing up, and obviously when I was in middle school and high school, you know, I listened to the Vanilla Ices and MC Hammers of the world. But that stuff faded away. It didn’t stick with me like Randy Travis’s music has over the years.

You’re saying “U Can’t Touch This” doesn’t still resonate deeply?
[laughs] It definitely makes you smile.

You have this great advantage in your voice—it’s instantly recognizable. What else does it take to stand out on country radio these days?
I think a lot of it is just having a direction. Knowing exactly who you are, and putting together a great team around you. And whether it’s your voice or the sound of production on your record, or the kind of songs you’re writing or recording, you have to have something that says, This is who I am. When you hear a Shania Twain song, you know it’s Shania Twain. When you hear Reba McEntire, you can’t mistake that voice.

The men of country music have all sort of clustered together right now, and it feels like we’re waiting for the next breakout star, the next Kenny, the next Keith. What will it take for that breakout guy to be you?
I’m always searching for that better song. I’m a student of what I’ve already done. If I quit improving, then you might as well bury me. I’m always trying to improve on what I’ve done, from photos to artwork to mixing to my live shows. I think the key nowadays, in today’s climate, anyway, is having hits. You have to have hits. That’s how you get the music out there to the people, and that’s how a lot of decision-makers in this business gauge success: Is he capable of having hits?

Does that influence what songs go on your albums? Will you choose potential singles over songs you think are just good?
Oh, absolutely. One of my buddies, Shawn Camp, wrote a song called “River of Love.” And I loved the song, but I knew deep down that if I put that on my record, it probably wouldn’t be a hit for me. But I knew that it could be a hit for somebody else. George Strait cut it, and had a No. 1 song with it. That’s a fine example. Jamey Johnson’s “In Color”—that was also a song I passed on. I knew it was a good song, but it wasn’t the right song for me at the time. There was no better artist to cut “In Color” than Jamey Johnson. He wrote it. When I heard it, he was singing the demo. And it was the perfect song for his voice and his personality. It took a lot for me to stand there and say, Okay, I’m willing to let this good song go, because it’s not me. And I’ve had people fight me at my label before on that, but I don’t think they see things the way I see them. [laughs]

When did it sink in that you could do this for the rest of your life?
That moment happened a long time ago, before I even came to Nashville. [laughs] I just really believe that this is what the Lord put me on this earth to do. He gave me this voice and this talent for a reason, and I’m using it for Him. There was never a Plan B.

Do you ever struggle with living out your faith in the public eye?
I don’t struggle with it, but I know the limits, you know? I know how much I need to do it, and how much I don’t. One thing I feel like a lot of people don’t understand about me, and I feel like this has been kind of a—I don’t even know what the word is, but this is one of the reasons a lot of people don’t get me. A lot of people see me as this gospel singer, this strong Christian, and I think a lot of people wonder, Why is he in country music? [laughs] The thing people don’t understand is, I love country music. I grew up a country boy. Country music was the form of music I could relate to, because the subject matter in those songs was stuff I was seeing every day. But that didn’t mean that I wasn’t a Christian. That governs each and every decision I make, whether it’s in my personal or professional life. But I wasn’t called to gospel music. I’ve never really liked contemporary Christian music. I hate to say it, but it’s never been a music that’s spoken to me. I feel like I was called to country music. That’s where my passion is. And I think there’s a reason for that. I think God is allowing me to use my talent in this industry to reach people in a positive way. And so when you hear a gospel song on my record, it’s not because I wish I could do a whole album of the stuff. I’ve got 11 songs on my record. Each one of those 11 songs is a reflection of part of my personality or my character, or who I am. They’re like personality traits, in a way. Each and every song shows a different side of Josh Turner. And that gospel song on the record is one of those 11 pieces of me.

Is there a theme you won’t address because of your faith?
A lot of times it depends on how it’s addressed, but one thing I won’t do is get out there and sing about drinkin’. Cause I don’t drink. How hypocritical would it be, even if I thought it was going to be a hit? It’s not a part of who I am. And a lot of times these cheatin’ songs—I grew up on cheatin’ songs, but morally, I don’t do that. A lot of times it’s better received if it’s a cover, or I’m doing it as a one-time thing for an event. But to go and put something like that on my record, you know, that’s gonna be out there forever.

What’s the big dream for you as an artist right now?
I think this is a long-term goal, but I want to end up in the Country Music Hall of Fame. That’s always been my goal. I’m just taking it one day at a time. I realize I have to keep working hard every day, keep playing hits, and selling records. And I have to earn a lot of people’s respect along the way.

And I’m assuming you’d like to be next to Randy Travis when you go in?
Both of our last names start with T…

(Follow the Music Mix on Twitter: @EWMusicMix.)

More from EW.com’s Music Mix:
Ke$ha did not vandalize the Hollywood Sign, officials confirm. Come on.
Frances Bean Cobain to make recording debut
Kelly Clarkson responds to Taylor Swift’s record-label defense: ‘Take a lesson’
U.K. twin sensation Jedward cover “Under Pressure”: The crazy video — with Vanilla Ice cameo! — you didn’t know you needed
Fall Out Boy: Done for good?
Lady Antebellum tops the albums chart


Comments (11 total) Add your comment
  • Danielle

    Isn’t Carrie Underwood the youngest Opry member?

    • Isembard

      You’re right, EW’s wrong – pathetic when it’s their job to get such things right. CU is 26, while this fellow is 32. In my neck of the woods, that makes her younger.

      • Whitney Pastorek

        that’s my bad. I meant youngest MALE. have edited to fix.

  • Rae

    Josh Turner seems like a sweetheart. Nice interview. I do believe though that Carrie Underwood is the youngest member of the Grand Ole Opry.

  • flicketyflack

    I love how unapologetic Josh Turner is about his taste in music. I hope the new album does great. I like Why Don’t We Just Dance. I’m hoping for some good uptempos a la Will You Go With Me.

    It’s amazing thinking he passed on In Color but he’s right – Jamey Johnson HAD to be the one who sang that song.

  • Tim

    Just what the world needs, more proselytizing under the cover of country/pop music. Ack.

    • Mel

      Just curious, Tim: which of his songs do you find to be proselytizing?

      • “the way he was raised”, “me and god”, “nowhere fast”, “long black train”, and “everything is fine”, to name a few.

  • James

    Tim, is it not stifling to ask someone for whom their faith is a big part of them to completely leave that out of their music? Would you ask that of any other kind of artist? The man explained his reasons and its not under any guise that he is singing about God in his songs.
    -James

  • Tanner Bourassa

    I Love the song I wouldn’t be a man is a great song for people to play to the person they long to make their relationship stronger if they are in a bad situation

  • webwinkel| software| kleding| goedkoop| webshop |online | kinderkleding| kleding| speelgoed| baby| stoffen| fietsen| meubels| mode| sieraden| dameskleding| elektronica| schoenen| computer| electronica| dieren| damesmode| kinderen| pc| sport| tv| hobby| fi

    Thanks for this info have a lot in there is so little information about this topic keep it up

Add your comment
The rules: Keep it clean, and stay on the subject - or we may delete your comment. If you see inappropriate language, e-mail us. An asterisk (*) indicates a required field.

When you click on the "Post Comment" button above to submit your comments, you are indicating your acceptance of and are agreeing to the Terms of Service. You can also read our Privacy Policy.

Latest Videos in Music

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP