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Oh Lorde! Read the singer's live tweets from a Bulls game. Seriously.

Here’s what we know about Lorde.

The Grammy winner will never be royal, and apparently she doesn’t know much about basketball. The New Zealand native spent St. Patrick’s Day in Chicago at the Bulls game, and shared some of insightful thoughts to her 1.25 million followers — and even an appearance on the infamous kiss cam.

Read below and relive it in real time:

St. Vincent picks her three favorite cult albums

St. Vincent, a.k.a. Annie Clark, is currently one of the biggest stars in the indie-rock constellation, thanks to her excellent recent self-titled album (seriously, it’s that good; go get it if you haven’t yet).

But last week, she took time off of her current tour to share some of her favorite albums by female artists who didn’t quite reach the mainstream, or have been forgotten since their long-ago moments in the spotlight.

Below, her picks:
Solex
“It’s interesting because she made records in the 1990s using samples from other records, but she did it before it was easy to do. It was a really painstaking process, sampling records into a sampler and then playing them over in order to make something out of them—they’re really alien-pop and catchy and interesting. It was one of my favorite records growing up.”

Selda
“My fiend Cate Le Bon hitched me to her record a few years ago…it’s epically awesome. It’s got a confluence of Turkish folk music mixed with the British and American thing that was happening at the time.”

Cate Le Bon
“Cate is great! She’s got a few records out…but her record Cyrk, I listen to over and over again….I liked her record and asked her to go on tour with me supporting Strange Mercy and then we became great friends. She’s just phenomenal. Great guitar player, too.”

Pick up this week’s issue of Entertainment Weekly for more criminally underrated entertainment.

Fred Armisen's favorite cult records: The 'Portlandia' star talks Lungfish, the Damned, Wendy and Lisa and more

He may be British rocker Ian Rubbish or The Man With the Really Amazing Home Studio to you, but Fred Armisen was famously an actual musician (with the Chicago post-hardcore band Trenchmouth) years before he became a star on Saturday Night Live and Portlandia.

Recently, the actor/drummer/satirist-about-town, who’s also the new bandleader on Late Night with Seth Meyers, shared some of his favorite cult music picks with EW:

Klark Kent

“Klark Kent is an artist who is actually Stewart Copeland from the Police. And he put out these records, these singles and this one EP and it was all on green vinyl.  And Steward Copeland…this record is one of my favorite albums ever. He plays all the instruments and you can hear his influence on The Police. You can kind of see that he really was a third of that band. It’s so…the musicianship is great but at the same time it’s also still a very good punk new wave album. It has energy, it has a bit of a sense of humor to it, all the things about punk that I really love, all the positivity of punk.” READ FULL STORY

Rolling Stones scrap show after L'Wren Scott death

The Rolling Stones have canceled the first date on their Australian tour after the death of fashion designer L’Wren Scott, Mick Jagger’s girlfriend.

The designer, whose company was heavily in debt, was found dead in her New York apartment Monday in an apparent suicide.

Concert organizer Frontier Touring said Tuesday that a Stones show scheduled for Wednesday in Perth, Western Australia, would not go ahead. There was no immediate word on future dates on the tour, including a Saturday concert in Adelaide.

Jagger’s representative said the singer was “completely shocked and devastated by the news” of Scott’s death.

READ FULL STORY

MIA's battle with NFL over Super Bowl finger gets uglier

MIA and the NFL are two acronyms that really don’t seem to fit together.

Two years after the singer showed her middle finger during Madonna’s 2012 Super Bowl Halftime Show performance, the NFL is demanding over $16 million in restitution and damages. Today, M.I.A. tweeted an image of an email document that the NFL has also asked her to sign.

As MIA’s lawyer pointed out, the half time show has featured many more risqué performances in the past, most notably Prince’s giant “penis” guitar in 2007 and Michael Jackson who in 1993 “repeatedly grabbed or fondled his genitalia.”

Also not pilloried by the NFL? The young black girls who danced throughout Madonna’s performance. “Madonna got them from a local high school in Indianapolis,” the singer said in a recent interview, according to the NY Daily News.. “They were under 16. If you look at them they’re wearing cheerleader outfits, hips thrusting in the air, legs wide open … in a very sexually provocative position.”

“Now they’re scapegoating me into figuring out what is the goal post of what’s offensive in America …. Like, is my finger offensive? Or is an underage black girl with her legs wide open more offensive to the family audience? It’s a massive waste of time, a massive waste of money. It’s a massive display of powerful corporation d–k shaking.”

“They want me on my knees, to say sorry so they can slap me on my wrist, and basically say it’s okay for me to promote being sexually exploited as a female, but then to display female empowerment through being punk rock.”

The Stooges drummer Scott Asheton dies

Scott Asheton, the drummer for punk icons the Stooges, has died at 64. The immediate cause was not disclosed, but he had suffered a major stroke in 2011 after a live performance in France.

Aside from Iggy Pop, Asheton was the last remaining core member of the band; his older brother Ron, the guitarist, passed away in 2009, and bassist Dave Alexander died in 1975.

The Stooges’ initial run fit the punk-rock ethos of burning bright and fast: They released a trio of now-classic albums beginning with their self-titled debut in 1969 and followed by 1970′s Fun House and 1973′s Raw Power, before breaking up in 1974 in part because of Pop’s heroin addiction.

Scott went on to play drums in Fred “Sonic” Smith’s Sonic Rendezvouz, and later in Scot’s Pirates, Sonny Vincent’s Rat Race Choir, and his own band Rock Action. He rejoined the Stooges in 2003. The group was famously nominated for the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame seven times before finally being inducted in 2010 by fellow Michigan native Madonna.

Pop posted a message on his official Facebook page yesterday: READ FULL STORY

This radio station's been playing Nelly's 'Hot in Herre' on a loop... since Friday

How hot can it possibly get?

A radio station in San Fransisco has been playing Nelly’s 2002 hit “Hot in Herre” on an endless loop since Friday afternoon. And not because a DJ has gone insane: The loop is part of a publicity stunt. Monday night, the Univision-owned Latino Mix 105.7 is relaunching as Hot 105.7, RadioInsights.com reports. Once the switch happens, the Nelly flashback will stop.

The “Hot In Herre” loop has inspired the hashtag #Nelly1057, which Nelly himself has naturally jumped on.

If you’re not in the Bay area, never fear; put a band-aid on your face and relive 2002 below: READ FULL STORY

SXSW: Rick Ross takes a victory lap, 2 Chainz closes out the weekend

The Syracuse hardcore band Perfect Pussy won the lion’s share of SXSW’s cool-kid attention. Destruction Unit put on some of the week’s most raucous shows. Bigger bands (well, relatively) like Speedy Ortiz, Cloud Nothings, Parquet Courts, and F—ed Up went above and beyond to put on a slew of killer parties.

But who cares about that crap, because Rick Ross has the No. 1 album in the country!!!! Did you know that Rick Ross has the No. 1 album in the country? If you didn’t, he and his hype man at the Fader Fort last night made sure to remind everyone over and over. And over.

As has been the trend for a few years now, Big Rap turned SXSW into its own game. The festival’s closing night drove that point home: Ross celebrated his chart-topping new record Mastermind by headlining Fader, A$AP Mob and Mobb Deep capped their own busy weeks at 1100 Warehouse, and 2 Chainz took over a showcase at Brazos Hall.

Clearly, it was a rap-heavy schedule, and that’s not even counting Jay And Kanye’s Samsung event Wednesday night or the shows by Future, Pusha T, Kendrick Lamar, Big Sean, B.o.B., Nas, and, um, Ludacris.

READ FULL STORY

SXSW Saturday: Phantogram, and the end of a very weird week

After a long few days of indie rock, mixtape rap, pop stars playing small, and smoked meat, it was time to put a bow on the annual South By Southwest festival.

The schedule for Saturday night was strange. In the past, Saturday night shows have always been the biggest, but this year, a number of bands had already left town, and with the likes of Lady Gaga, Coldplay, and Kendrick Lamar having wrapped their high-profile performances, it left a hodgepodge of mid-level indie and hip-hop to send everyone off.

Enter Phantogram, an excellent computer-pop combo whose new album Voices gently nudges their sound towards an even wider audience than the one that picked up on their first buzz-band moment several years ago. Like an overwhelming number of the acts booked at SXSW, they are big enough to get booked on late-night TV but not quite big enough to be played on pop radio or fill larger venues. For a band like Phantogram, a solid showing at SXSW could mean an elevation to that next level. READ FULL STORY

SXSW Friday: Soundgarden, Green Day, and the search for something loud

With Lady Gaga and her bucking vomitron in my rearview, my personal goal for Friday at SXSW was to find some good old-fashioned, turned-to-11 rawk. I had already seen a lot of about-to-break indie, a handful of promising rappers, and one gigantic intergalactic pop star. Now it was time to find some volume.

Anybody who has read my tweets or been forced to sit outside my office for months at a time under the auspices of “work experience” (sorry, interns!) knows that I like things fast and loud, which often means in extreme metal. But punk, garage rock, prog — these are all things that will satisfy my jones, and I was determined to seek out as many opportunities to permanently damage my hearing as I could find.

The day opened at Stubb’s at the Spin magazine party, a tradition that stretches back more than a decade. This year’s bill featured a fine cross-section of indie rock and fringe rap, with a lineup that included Future, Cloud Nothings, Against Me!, and Schoolboy Q. But my main concern was Radkey, a group made up of three brothers (ages 16, 18, and 20) who grind out delightfully unhinged punk tunes that also owe a healthy bit to Reagan-era thrash. It’s grim-sounding but well-executed, and as soon as their songwriting evolves even a tiny bit, they are going to be dangerous.  READ FULL STORY

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