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Q&A: Broods talk about their breakout single 'Mother & Father'

Broods are a brother and sister—Georgia and Caleb Nott—based out of Auckland, New Zealand. Geographically inclined pop listeners will note that this is where zeitgeist-dominating teen pop phenomenon Lorde also lives, and the two acts have more in common than just a hometown–Broods’ upcoming album, Evergreen, was produced by Joel Little, who also helmed Pure Heroine, and they share a common goal of uniting radio-friendly pop hooks and the cool-toned minimalist aesthetic that’s been dominating hip-hop during the Drake era.

Recently they released the first single from Evergreen, “Mother & Father,” and with its sweeping hook and up-to-the-minute production it’s already looking like it has a good chance of continuing the Kiwi takeover of the American pop charts. (Their upcoming tour with Sam Smith should help as well.) EW got on the phone with Georgia Nott to discuss it.

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Video: Kasai Allstars' 'Yangye, The Evil Leopard'

Kasai Allstars are from the Kasai region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and as their name suggests, they’re something of a supergroup, with around 25 musicians drawn not only from six different bands but from five different ethnic groups that reside in the area, not all of which have historically gotten along. Their music not only bridges the gaps between their disparate musical cultures, but in the process of adapting parts for traditional acoustic instruments for modern electrified ones they link two distinct eras of African music.

Crammed Discs just released the group’s double album, Beware the Fetish, which offers not only a pleasurable crash course in Congolese folklore (it includes story-songs with evocative titles like “As They Walked Into the Forest On a Sunday, They Encountered Apes Dressed as Humans”) but a blend of hypnotic rhythms and peripatetic melodies that should appeal equally to fans of dance music and jazz. In the meantime, here’s the video for “Yangye, the Evil Leopard.”

 

T.I. and Tiny are fighting and writing songs about it

On a good day, rapper T.I. and his wife Tameka “Tiny” Harris have enough drama going on in their lives to test the very limits of the reality show they’ve inhabited since 2011 on T.I. & Tiny: The Family Hustle, and the past few months have been particularly dramatic—even by their standards.

Never ones to handle things anything close to quietly, Tip and Tiny have apparently decided to address the situation through a pair of songs about their relationship. Yesterday, T.I. released a new single, “Stay,” a slow jam with an early-Kanye-style chipmunk soul sample and nostalgia-drenched lyrics that profess undying devotion to a woman with the clumsily earnest hyperbole of a New Edition song. (“Girl, together or apart / But you’ll be forever in my heart, I swear.”)

T.I. and boxer Floyd Mayweather have been beefing recently, and back in May the situation escalated when Mayweather seemingly claimed during a press conference to have slept with Tiny. (Mayweather says he was misheard.) At the same time, the runaway success of T.I.’s protege Iggy Azalea has reignited longstanding rumors that their relationship extends beyond business.

At nearly the same time “Stay” went online, Tiny was posting a new video for “What You Gon Do?” which offers a much different take, and as its combative title suggests (the dirty version is actually called “What The F@#K You Gon Do?”), it doesn’t share “Stay”‘s optimistic perspective. The co-writer of “No Scrubs,” Harris is an expert at airing out men who don’t meet her standards, and the lyrics run down a long list of a partner’s shortcomings, interspersed with threats to up and leave him. The combination of unflinching frankness and a beat that consists of little more than a fantastically deep bass line is enough to blow the sappy “Stay” out of the water. If Tiny and T.I. are entering a full-blown feud with one another (whether actual, scripted or somewhere in between), she’s taking an early lead.

Taylor Swift, Coldplay lead iHeartRadio Music Festival lineup

It has just as many famous people as Taylor Swift’s Instagram vacations, but this time we’re all invited.

In a press release today, Clear Channel announced the lineup for the 2014 iHeartRadio Music Festival, which will take place on September 19 and 20 in Las Vegas.

The performers include Taylor Swift, Coldplay, Usher, Ariana Grande, Nicki Minaj, Motley Crue, Zac Brown Band, One Direction, Ed Sheeran, Paramore, Iggy Azalea, Train, Eric Church, Lorde, Calvin Harris, Bastille, Steve Aoki and more.

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Video: Mac Miller drinks whiskey and joins an Irish bar band

For the second season premiere of his reality show, Mac Miller and the Most Dope Family, the unlikely chart-topping MC (and co-star of Ariana Grande’s ’90s-throwback hit “The Way”) brings his crew on a trip to Ireland as the opening act for Lil Wayne’s tour. Miller uses the excursion as an opportunity to get in touch with his Irish roots, which seems to involve a lot of yelling at the country’s rolling green hills and drinking a bunch of Irish whiskey. After a few Jamesons at a local pub, he decides to sit in with the house band to explore a trad-folk side that his records probably haven’t prepared you for.

The new season starts tonight at 11:30 ET on MTV2.

Jack White ventures into publishing

Third-Man-Books

Jack White’s Third Man Records has made its name on compellingly ambiguous projects that exist in a sort of quantum superposition of established formats: a record store that’s also a recording studio, a box set that’s also a piece of furniture. The company has just announced that it’s moving into the publishing world with the first release from its Third Man Books imprint, and as should be expected, the “book” that it’s putting out isn’t just a book.

Language Lessons: Volume I has its bookish aspects—in particular, a 321-page hardbound anthology of prose and poetry co-edited by poet/musician Chet Weise and Third Man co-founder Ben Swank that includes award-winning writers like Dale Ray Phillips, C.D. Wright, and Adrian Matejka. It also includes five prints of poems illustrated by underground comics artist Jim Blanchard and Tim Kerr, the former guitarist for Texan hardcore pioneers Big Boys. And to take the project to the level of complexity that Third Man is famous for, the “book” also includes a compilation album that includes contributions from such diverse artists as trash-rockers Destruction Unit and legendary avant-jazz saxophonist Ken Vandermark.

The set, which retails for $50, arrives on shelves August 5 and is available for pre-order now.

Q&A: Neneh Cherry is 'never really worried about being trendy'

Twenty-six years ago, Neneh Cherry turned the pop world on its ear with her single “Buffalo Stance,” which whipped pop, R&B, punk, and two genres—hip-hop and dance music—that at the time had just started to emerge as distinct musical movements into an addictively danceable froth. The song made it almost all the way to No. 1 on the Hot 100, thanks to its infinitely catchy chorus—a sneak diss at a materialistic ex—but mainstream listeners didn’t know exactly what to do with Cherry’s experimental ways and protean identity. She followed up her debut, Raw Like Sushi (which “Buffalo Stance” made into an unlikely hit) with an album where she collaborated with both Michael Stipe and the Notorious B.I.G., and a confused public quickly bailed.

Cherry maintained an underground following, though, and they stuck around while she spent over a decade in semi-retirement. In 2012, she re-emerged with an energetic collaboration with the Scandinavian free jazz combo The Thing, and earlier this year she released Blank Project, recorded alongside the British electronic duo RocketNumberNine and dance music experimentalist Kieran Hebden (aka Four Tet), that felt like a quieter, more mature continuation of the work she did at the beginning of her career. At the same time, that early work has become more influential than ever as a generation of young artists have rediscovered Raw‘s brilliant genre-blindness and made it their own.

Over the weekend, Cherry performed at the Pitchfork Music Festival, and afterward EW sat down with her to talk about her legacy, her comeback, and the process that drives it all.

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Chippy Nonstop unveils her dirty-cute single 'Peeka'

Rapper and burgeoning pop star Chippy Nonstop resides in Los Angeles, but it might be more accurate to say she lives on the Internet, where she’s amassed an army of fans on Twitter and other social networking platforms through virally popular singles like “Money Dance” and “Kicked Out Da Club.” The latter single perfectly sums up both her sound (club rap with an emphasis on regional styles like Bay Area hyphy) and her philosophy (which is YOLO to the extreme).

Her latest single is called “Peeka,” which pairs a buzzy, bass-heavy beat with pitch-shifted vocals that use the name of the most popular Pokemon character as a euphemism for a very non-G-rated act. She says that it was recorded in just one day, and that, “I want my fans to have this song for the summer time to dance outside their homes in the sprinklers in.” As I write this, those fans are feverishly posting memes in anticipation of its release, so without further ado, here it is.

White Arrows get electro-psychedelic with 'We Can't Ever Die'

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Los Angeles quintet White Arrows are indie rockers with big pop ambitions and a whole bunch of synthesizers. This combination has earned them spots on tours with taste-making bands like Cults and White Denim and slots at big festivals like Coachella and Sasquatch. After several years of touring behind their debut album, Dry Land Is Not A Myth, they’ve finally followed it up with In Bardo, out Sept. 16 on Votiv. On the lead single, “We Can’t Ever Die,” funky, disco-inflected verses segue smoothly into arena-worthy hooks that sound like a modern, not-annoying reincarnation of U2, with the whole thing decorated with burbling 8-bit-style synths. They’re on tour with the Neighbourhood and Danny Brown through the end of the month.

Hear Claude VonStroke's acid-drenched banger 'CaliFuture'

Claude VonStroke has spent the decade pushing dance music’s boundaries while maintaining a strong link to the style’s roots, something a lot of bigger EDM acts just don’t have. On his latest, “CaliFuture,” he fuses the gnarly, squelching synths of vintage Chicago acid house with a funky vocal line that sounds like it could have been lifted right off some super-rare ’80s electro 12-inch.

“I moved to California over 17 years ago with big dreams just like everyone else,” VonStroke says of the song’s lyrical theme. “Originally I thought I would be a filmmaker but I was always better at music. I worked every job from fake perfume salesman to tour guide at Paramount. I got screamed at for many years by Ari Gold-type movie producers but always with a blind belief that someday something good would happen. That’s what this song is about: the underlying belief that no matter how bad it is, you can be plucked out of oblivion and make it big in California.”

“CaliFuture” is available now on Beatport.

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