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M.I.A. and Partysquad release 'Gold'

Dutch DJ duo Partysquad were part of the sprawling crew of producers behind M.I.A.’s brilliant and noisy Matangi album, helping bring to life the Shampoo-referencing standout track “Double Bubble Trouble.” M.I.A.’s returned the favor now by appearing on the pair’s new Partysquad Summer Mixtape 2014. Along with a remix of “Double Bubble Trouble,” the 77-minute DJ mix also features a brand new collaboration with the Sri Lankan-born singer.

With its rowdy pile-up of handclaps, whistles, Caribbean rhythms, and woozy, pitch-bent synthesizer horns,”Gold” would have fit in well on Matangi. Actually, it sounds quite a bit like a Diplo production–Partysquad co-authored Major Lazer’s cacophonous reggae/EDM hybrid “Original Don”–so it does a pretty good job of suggesting what it might sound like if the creative partnership of M.I.A. and the DJ hadn’t flamed out as spectacularly as their romantic one.













Watch previously unreleased Woodstock footage of Crosby, Stills & Nash

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The Oscar-winning 1970 concert documentary Woodstock celebrated its 40th anniversary a few years ago, but Warner Bros. is already re-revisiting. The new three-disc Blu-ray set, fittingly titled Woodstock 40th Anniversary Limited Edition Revisited, features the film’s four-hour director’s cut, two discs of extras, and a souvenir pack filled with reproductions of articles on the concert from Life magazine and The New York Times, a pair of reproduction concert tickets, and an embroidered iron-on patch with the classic dove-and-guitar logo.

While 40 years seems like a long time for footage from the festival to remain unreleased–especially when you consider that nostalgia for Woodstock seems to have kicked in before everyone had even exited the grounds–the set features a clutch of previously un-issued performances from some of the lineup’s biggest names (as well as Sha Na Na). Here’s an exclusive look at one such clip, of Crosby, Stills & Nash singing their classic “Helplessly Hoping”: READ FULL STORY

'Billboard' Hot 100 recap: Magic! stays on top but has new challengers

OK this is getting ridiculous. Aside from a few songs trading positions and one relatively drastic two-slot drop for Jason Derulo and Snoop Dogg’s “Wiggle,” the Top 10 is exactly how it was last week, making it a solid month since there was anything close to a shakeup at the top of the Hot 100.

Luckily, for those of us who prefer an active and exciting pop chart that isn’t being smothered by the unstoppable combination of “Fancy” and “Rude,” help may be on the way, in the form of a few could-be hits waiting for ignition.

Pharrell Williams’ “Come Get It Bae” just released its video yesterday, and its Miley cameo and “women of all shapes, sizes, and colors are beautiful” theme have already earned it over a million plays. The clip is already on its way to “Blurred Lines”-style popularity, so while this week it’s only at No. 60, down four spots from last week after nine weeks on the chart, a viral boost from the video could give it the momentum to turn things around and make its way toward the Top 10. It doesn’t hurt that the song’s stripped-down, clap-happy beat brings back some of the original Neptunes flavor that made Williams a star in the first place.

Kiesza’s “Hideaway” video has been out since February, racking up over 60 million views in that time, but it’s just now cracked the Hot 100 with its debut at No. 97. The fact that it’s still gaining popularity nearly half a year later bodes well for it, and its hooky amalgam of pop and house, redolent of early ’90s club-pop divas like Cathy Dennis, is at the bleeding edge of current retro tastes, if that makes any sense. Plus its video is the type of shamelessly corny fun that’s hard to deny, even if you’re the type of hipster who’s supposed to be mad that they shot it in Williamsburg.

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Jenny Lewis' 'The Voyager' started as a challenge from Ryan Adams

Jenny Lewis’ excellent new solo album The Voyager doesn’t officially arrive until this Tuesday, July 29, but you can currently stream it in its entirety over at Amazon Music. It’s a remarkable album, full of sweet summertime memories and vivid storytelling.

Several of the tracks from The Voyager have already been released, including the Hollywood cross-dresser assisted “Just One of the Guys,” the breezy “She’s Not Me,” and the stark, heartbreaking title track. READ FULL STORY

Robin Thicke's 'Paula' doesn't seem to have fixed his marital problems

 A new report from TMZ suggests that Robin Thicke has given up his quixotic quest to win back his estranged wife Paula Patton, “telling people in his camp” that the marriage “has collapsed.” The L.A. home that the two shared until Patton moved out in February is also up for sale now, which makes the split seem even more final. Apparently recording a deeply creepy and not-very-good record that no one wants to buy isn’t the key to winning back a lost lover.

If Thicke really is throwing in the towel, it raises the question of whether this whole Hail Mary of a concept album/plea for forgiveness was really worth the effort. Calling the mission off after not even an entire month suggests this may have all just been a poorly conceived, poorly executed idea that wasn’t any more effective than leaving your ex a bunch of long, drunken voicemails (which Paula feels like for most of its running time).

But anyhow: If Paula Patton finally calls it quits, and she keeps on refusing to engage the celebrity gossip machine, we could finally be seeing the light at the end of the tunnel of this whole awkwardly tacky episode. And if Thicke doesn’t come roaring back in the next six months or so with the best R&B record ever recorded, we might even be done talking about him at all.

Pharrell and Miley Cyrus team up for puzzling 'Come Get It Bae' video

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Pharrell’s new video for “Come Get It Bae” brings up a lot of questions: Why does the video start out by stating “beauty has no expiration date,” only for the multiple dancers in the video to all look to be in their thirties or younger? Why is Pharrell filming the dancers? Shouldn’t he be singing?

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Watch El May's NYC-centric video for 'I Played a Role'

For the first video from her forthcoming sophomore album, The Other Person Is You, singer-songwriter Lara Meyerratken, aka El May, took to the streets of New York City with director Yaara Sumeruk. The Australian musician brought along a pair of headphones and an iPhone loaded with her bouncy, dancehall-infused single “I Played a Role” and captured the reactions of people on the street hearing the track for the first time. Like Meyerratken, the song and the video’s conceit are fun and more than a little cutesy without crossing over into full-blown twee quirkiness.

“The train scene was our dream come true,” Meyerratken, who resides in L.A., writes in an email. “We had imagined a best-case scenario, where our journey around the city over the two days coincided with some amazing subway dancers. At the end of the day, headed to our final locations, exhausted on the J train, we heard the famous call: ‘SHOW TIME!’ So we approached them… it turned out to be a real highlight!”

The Other Person Is You, which features contributions from indie rock royalty like the Vaselines’ Eugene Kelly and Britta Phillips and Dean Wareham from Luna, is out Aug. 26.

Questlove on the Iggy Azalea debate: 'Hip-hop is a contagious culture'

Most people recognize Questlove as The Roots’ drummer and Jimmy Fallon’s sidekick, but as of Wednesday night, he will also be the executive producer of SoundClash, a new music show coming to VH1 and Palladia. In honor of this venture, in which he gets top artists to play different renditions of their hits and/or cover other performers’ work, Time talked with the artist about the music of summer, and specifically, where he falls on the cultural appropriation debate surrounding Iggy Azalea.

When asked if he was pro- or anti-Azalea, Questlove said he can see both sides. “I’m caught in between,” he said. “And I defend it. I see false Instagram posts like, ‘She said the N-word! She said the N-word!’ I’ll call people out—’Yo, don’t troll.’ I know you’re ready to give your 42-page dissertation on theGrio about why this is culture vulture-ism.

“You know, we as black people have to come to grips that hip-hop is a contagious culture,” Questlove continued. “If you love something, you gotta set it free. I will say that ‘Fancy,’ above any song that I’ve ever heard or dealt with, is a game-changer in that fact that we’re truly going to have to come to grips with the fact that hip-hop has spread its wings.”

For Questlove, the Azalea conversation is about more than just her music. It’s also about where she’s from. And she isn’t the only Australian artist Questlove’s currently listening to. “I don’t think it’s a mistake that a lot of of my favorite artists are coming from Down Under,” he said. “A lot of them [are] more soulful than what we’re dealing with now. When you think soul music and Aretha Franklin and the Baptist-born singer, that’s sort of an idea in the past. As black people, we’re really not in the church as we used to be, and that’s reflected in the songs now.”

Though he’s still on the fence about the simmering Azalea controversy—”I’m not going to lie to you, I’m torn between the opinions on the internet, but I’mma let Iggy be Iggy,” Questlove said—he was able to come to a decision on whether her hit “Fancy” should be labeled the song of the summer. “The song is effective. I’m in the middle of the approximation of the enunciation, I’ll say,” he explained, again acknowledging the debate. “Part of me hopes she grows out of that and [sings] with her regular dialect—I think that would be cooler. But, yeah, ‘Fancy’ is the song of the summer.”

Hear Yawn's psych-rocking new track 'Flytrap'

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Yawn is an electronics-heavy pop band who has spent the past five years building up a reputation in the Chicago DIY scene, and the band is starting to ease its way up aboveground. Last year, they played Lollapalooza, and this year they’re releasing their second album, Love Chills, with an immediately catchy lead single.

Like the rest of the LP, “Flytrap” was recorded in the band’s live-in studio, which was formerly occupied by the bro-metal band Disturbed (of “Down With the Sickness” fame), and its combination of swaggering fuzztone riffs and trippy electronic flourishes sound like something that will land them a nice spot on the festival circuit.

Love Chills is out September 9 on Old Flame.

Q&A: Broods talk about their breakout single 'Mother & Father'

Broods are a brother and sister—Georgia and Caleb Nott—based out of Auckland, New Zealand. Geographically inclined pop listeners will note that this is where zeitgeist-dominating teen pop phenomenon Lorde also lives, and the two acts have more in common than just a hometown–Broods’ upcoming album, Evergreen, was produced by Joel Little, who also helmed Pure Heroine, and they share a common goal of uniting radio-friendly pop hooks and the cool-toned minimalist aesthetic that’s been dominating hip-hop during the Drake era.

Recently they released the first single from Evergreen, “Mother & Father,” and with its sweeping hook and up-to-the-minute production it’s already looking like it has a good chance of continuing the Kiwi takeover of the American pop charts. (Their upcoming tour with Sam Smith should help as well.) EW got on the phone with Georgia Nott to discuss it.

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