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Tag: About Last Night (31-40 of 210)

Governors Ball, Day 3: Kanye West debuts new songs, disses radio, demands croissants

Oh, poor Avett Brothers. As part of the counterprogamming scheme at New York’s Governors Ball festival, Sunday night’s schedule pitted the worthy North Carolina folk act against one of the most interesting, talked-about people making music right now: self-declared god Kanye West, whose sixth album Yeezus hits streets June 18.

And while we’re sure the A-Bros put on a great show for however many fans showed up for their set, the night clearly belonged to West, who drew a small nation of people to his festival-ending show at the event’s main stage.

In a way, it was just an afterparty for him. The future father celebrated his 36th birthday sans Kim Kardashian* Saturday night at a party in Manhattan’s West Village, where buddy Jay-Z, buddy-in-law Beyoncé, and fellow Gov Ball performer Nas were all on the guest list. (This might explain why Nas ended his headlining set early that night?) But despite the audience’s attempts to wish him a happy birthday, Kanye didn’t exactly look like he was in the mood for revelry when he took the stage at around 9:50 pm, twenty minutes behind schedule.

Flanked by a pair of jumbotrons flashing vidoes of barking dogs and Adbusters-y imagery, ‘Ye opened his set with the established Yeezus cuts “Black Skinhead” and “New Slaves” — in other words, the same thing you saw on his recent Saturday Night Live outing. While both songs were on the aggressive side, so far “New Slaves” seems to be the more enjoyable (or at least approachable) of the two. Take a look at both performances from the festival in the videos below:

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Governors Ball, Day 2: Guns N' Roses shoots fireworks early and often

In terms of the most rock-and-roll things a band could do, getting on stage early and starting your show ahead of schedule ranks pretty low. But that’s what happened last night when Guns N’ Roses appeared before the Governors Ball Festival audience in New York 15 or so minutes in front of their scheduled start time. Bon Jovi would be proud!

Wearing a black cowboy hat and a mischievous grin, Axl Rose commanded the show with not just one bang, but a series of them: very bright and very loud fireworks shot into the night sky behind the stage as the Hall of Fame band ripped through the songs that they’ve been ripping through for some 25 years now. Much of the crowd, judging by their hair-rock outfits and the color of their wristbands, bought their festival tickets mainly just to see Guns N’ Roses, and they were not disappointed. Beers were slammed, red bandanas were worn, and “Welcome to the Jungle,” “Paradise City,” “Live and Let Die” were played. The fireworks display (and thus our ear drums) were given a break when Axl hopped on the piano for “November Rain,” but the fiery light show returned for GNR’s show-ending “Sweet Child O’ Mine.”

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Governors Ball, Day 1: Lots of weather, some music, no Kings of Leon

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The British have a lot of weird old traditions, but perhaps the most peculiar one is their annual insistence on hanging out in the rain and mud to listen to music. Every year, thousands of otherwise normal-seeming Britons convene in the farms and parks of Reading and Leeds with the knowledge that they and their loved ones have a high chance of getting soaked. And the sick part is, they seem to enjoy it.

From what I could tell, the majority of people at the opening day of the Governors Ball Festival on New York City’s Randall’s Island were not British, and did not enjoy it. Yet amid a relentless battery of heavy rains and high winds courtesy of Tropical Storm Andrea, the festival did its best to keep calm on and carry on by sticking to their schedule of artists, which included Erykah Badu, Local Natives, Young the Giant, Best Coast, and more. At a certain point, though, you gotta know when to call it, and the Gov Ball organizers were forced to cancel the party before the night’s headliners, Kings of Leon and Pretty Lights, had a chance to take the stage. (To make up for it, Kings of Leon is now scheduled to play this evening.)

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Justin Bieber gets booed, demands to be taken seriously. Should he?

Is there anything more strange (or more exciting) at an awards show than a powerful heckle?

Statuette ceremonies are habitually such self-congratulatory group hugs that there’s rarely any room for dissent, so when the boos come out, it tends to stop the Internet in its tracks.

Last night’s Billboard Music Awards incident surely wasn’t the first time Justin Bieber has been booed, but even though he was wearing dark shades, it was clear he was shaken by the reaction. He pointed out to the crowd that he was still only 19 years old (even if it feels like we’ve had him in our lives for no less than four decades now), and that his level of success justified his victory.

But then he took a stand, letting loose with this instantly-infamous statement: “I really just want to say, it really should be about the music. It should be about the craft that I’m making. This is not a gimmick, I’m not — I’m an artist, and I should be taken seriously. And all this other bull should not be spoken of.”

Let’s make one thing clear: Justin Bieber would like you to talk about him because you like songs from Believe and not because he has monkey problems,  a blog-catnip on-again/off-again relationship with another pop star, and sometimes attacks photographers on the street. He wants to be known as an “artist,” whatever that means. He is not tabloid fodder nor a meme victim. He should be taken seriously.

And he’s right: Justin Bieber should be taken seriously. READ FULL STORY

Justin Bieber accosted by fan on stage in Dubai -- VIDEO

Justin Bieber must have been listening to a little Chumbawumba while on tour in Dubai, as he did in fact get knocked down and get back up again.

During Sunday night’s performance at Dubai’s Sevens Stadium, a fan broke through Bieber’s security and bounded toward the singer during a run through the title track from his latest album Believe. He didn’t get very far: A guard stormed the stage and tackled the overzealous fan, knocking over a grand piano. Ever the professional, Bieber simply sauntered away from the fracas and continued on with the song. It’s the latest unfortunate incident in a year full of them, involving fights, drugs, Anne Frank, and at least one monkey.

Check out fan-shot video of the incident below.  READ FULL STORY

On the scene: Rolling Stones open tour in L.A. with help from Gwen Stefani, Keith Urban

The Rolling Stones unofficially kicked off their 50th anniversary tour with a secret show at a small Los Angeles club last week, but Friday’s real opener at the Staples Center was anything but quiet or modest. The Stones opened their more than two-hour set with the UCLA marching band coming through the crowd (which included various celebrities, including Jack Nicholson in his usual Lakers spot, natch) playing the familiar chords of “Satisfaction.”

The Stones put on a show that included guest spots from Gwen Stefani and Keith Urban, as well as former Stones guitarist Mick Taylor. Proving that they’ve still got the moves, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Ronnie Wood, and Charlie Watts (age total combined: 274) strutted their stuff on a stage that jutted out from a pair of lips into their unmistakable tongue logo that allowed the band to walk into the crowd, or in Mick’s case, skip.

Celebrating 50 years as a band is no small feat and the show opened with a video montage of famous fans reminiscing about their favorite Stones albums and shows, from Iggy Pop (“I’d never seen people with teeth like that!”) to Pete Townshend to Cate Blanchett (“Just how skinny they are really pisses me off”).

Ticket prices for the show were astronomical, ranging from the steal of a pit ticket for $85 to more than $600 for better seats in the sold-out 20,000 capacity venue (although last-minute tickets were reportedly available under face value on ticket broker StubHub). Jagger didn’t let the price factor go unnoticed, greeting the crowd with a tongue-in-cheek jab at his wealthy clientele: “Good evening, Los Angeles — or is it really just Beverly Hills, Brentwood, and parts of Santa Monica?”

The Stones may be getting up there but they are no strangers to the Web. If you want to feel like you’re really at every show, following @rollingstones on Twitter is a sure-fire way to get addicted. The feed tweeted the entire set list — which barely missed a beat of the hits, from “Paint It Black” to “Start Me Up” — in real time. While a Stones show is always a special occasion, the show’s set closely followed their show in Brooklyn late last year, with deep cut departures and special guests to set the night apart.

Below, a look at the show’s biggest highlights:
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Fall Out Boy pay tribute to Spinal Tap on 'Conan': Watch here!

Fall Out Boy just dropped their latest (and actually very good) album Save Rock and Roll, and though their song titles are not as pun-tacular as they used to be, the band clearly hasn’t lost its sense of humor.

On last night’s episode of Conan, the band busted out Save Rock and Roll‘s first single “My Songs Know What You Did In the Dark” with a little help from the famous “Rock and Roll Creation” pods from This Is Spinal Tap.

When one of the pods failed to open (as they are wont to do) and imprisoned bassist Pete Wentz, Tap’s own bassist Derek Smalls (a.k.a. actor and writer Harry Shearer) filled in on the low end.

He brought along some pals, too. Check out the entirety of Fall Out Boy’s performance on last night’s episode of Conan below: READ FULL STORY

On the scene at Coachella Day Two: Phoenix, R. Kelly(!), Hot Chip and more

Will they or won’t they? As the sun set on Saturday night, one question hung over the Coachella audience like a cliffhanger in an ’80s dramedy.

Would Daft Punk join Phoenix at the end of the latter’s headlining main stage set? And if so, would there be pyramids, robots, and lasers, or just two Frenchmen pumping their fists in promotion of their forthcoming record?

The evidence stacked up in favor of a cameo from the famed Parisian electronic duo, whose 2006 Coachella set was widely considered the match that sparked the current mania for electronic music. For one, both members of Daft Punk were reportedly in attendance. On Friday, the festival main stage buzzed over a trailer hyping the group’s new record. Plus, there’s a long history of bonhomie between the two groups, including a 2010 Daft Punk pop-up appearance at Phoenix’s Madison Square Garden show.

Instead, we got R. Kelly. The 46-year old Chicago R&B lothario materialized towards the end of Phoenix’s set to play an abbreviated three song medley of “Bump n’ Grind,” “Ignition (Remix),” and “I’m a Flirt,” wearing an unbuttoned black shirt, blue jeans, and what appeared to be a crown.

Suddenly, the Empire Polo grounds transformed from a meticulous 80s synth-pop party into a gyrating outdoor boudoir. To say it was weird was an understatement.

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Coachella Day One: Blur, Skrillex's 'supergroup' Dog Blood, and more

The beauty (or not, depending on your point of view) of the Coachella Music and Arts Festival is that there’s no longer one Coachella Music Festival. Once a one-day event attended by 10,000 people, the Indio bacchanalia has become a rite of passage for North America’s 25-and-under population.

In 2013, it occupies half the weekends in April, with over 100 acts competing for attention, spread out across seven stages and enough art installations to satisfy even the most ardent aesthetic snob. Headliners this year include the reunited Stone Roses, Blur, Phoenix and the Red Hot Chili Peppers. Rumors of a Daft Punk appearance remain rampant.

But if there’s a unifying theme that’s emerged from the last few festivals, it’s that electronic music has supplanted rock as the primary locus. That’s not to say that there weren’t bravura sets from America and England’s most celebrated rock bands, but none could match the MDMA-addled hordes that congregated in the Sahara Tent, the festival’s dedicated airplane hanger for electronic dance music. READ FULL STORY

LL Cool J on 'Accidental Racist': 'The song wasn't perfect' -- VIDEO

Now that Brad Paisley has taken his turn trying to defend the batty lyrics to “Accidental Racist,” it’s time for LL Cool J to make his defense.

Last night on The Tonight Show, LL addressed the conversations over the song from Paisley’s new album Wheelhouse, which contains multiple lyrics that some judged insensitive to the actual struggles against racism. Paisley wanted credit for starting a conversation about difficult issues, while LL took a different approach.

“I feel good,” the rapper told Jay Leno when asked about the Internet fervor over the tune. “The song wasn’t perfect. You can’t fit 300 or 400 years of history into a three or four minute song.”

He continued, somewhat turning on the song. READ FULL STORY

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