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Tag: About Last Night (51-60 of 210)

John Cale celebrates the music of Nico with Kim Gordon, Greg Dulli, Yeasayer, and more

Christa Päffgen was better known to the world as Nico, the German-born art-rock chanteuse who lent her haunting vocals to the Velvet Underground’s most seminal work and carved out a deeply influential solo career. Though she passed away nearly 25 years ago, her work (especially The Velvet Underground & Nico and her 1967 solo debut Chelsea Girl) still echoes with incredible resonance. Her style inspired multiple generations of Goth acts, quirky-voiced art belters like Bjork, and filmmakers like Wes Anderson (who used two Chelsea Girl recordings during key moments in The Royal Tennenbaums; it could be argued that Gwyneth Paltrow’s character in that movie was at least partially inspired by Nico herself). 

Friend and frequent collaborator John Cale, a founding member of the Velvet Underground and producer of several Nico solo albums, recognizes her impact better than anybody. That is why Cale produced last night’s show Life Along the Borderline: A Tribute to Nico at the Brooklyn Academy of Music as part of their Next Wave Festival. For a sense of how deeply Nico’s songs have been felt, one need only look at the lineup of guests and collaborators who filled BAM’s Gilman Opera House: Sonic Youth founder Kim Gordon, Sharon Van Etten, Afghan Whigs frontman Greg Dulli, the Kills singer Alison Mosshart, Joan as Police Woman, Peaches, and Brooklyn indie groovers Yeasayer.

Nico’s songs offer a lot of unique opportunities: Most of them are made up of very few elements, which allowed many of last night’s interpreters to deconstruct those elements and glue them back together at strange angles. READ FULL STORY

Bruce Springsteen, the Who, Billy Joel, and Beatlevana: On the scene at 12-12-12

Wednesday night’s 12-12-12 benefit concert for Sandy relief was an unqualified success: Before even a single note was played on stage at New York’s Madison Square Garden, more than $30 million had already been raised for the Robin Hood Foundation through ticket sales, merchandise, and corporate pledges.

As a charity event, 12-12-12 was a slam dunk. As a musical entertainment endeavor, it was more of a mixed bag, full of plenty of glorious, triumphant moments for sure, but also bloated with curious choices and inexplicable performances.

Bruce Springsteen had the honor of kicking the show off, beginning his band’s brief set with “Land of Hope and Dreams.” As Jersey’s greatest ambassador for well over three decades, Springsteen sweated and howled through the opener’s anthemic refrain, only to raise the stakes on “Wrecking Ball,” a defiant anthem of hope from the album of the same name.

“Wrecking Ball” started a running theme of transformation through out the night: Familiar songs became re-packaged and recontextualized, and themes of renewal and rebirth crept up during the finest performances. READ FULL STORY

The Rolling Stones live in Brooklyn: On the scene

Can a rock show ever be just a rock show when it’s the Rolling Stones?

The band’s appearance Saturday night at the brand-new Barclays Center in Brooklyn — one of only five live dates in their 50th-anniversary celebration — was a lot of things: A history lesson, a victory lap, a possible swan song, and most of all, a strange sort of meta experience, a living diorama of rock & roll legendry.

In some ways, the concert itself almost seemed beside the point. For many of the fans who had paid hundreds and even thousands of dollars for their seats (yes, tickets were famously expensive, but almost no one in the very full house looked like they regretted the outlay) just being in a room that held Mick and Keith and Ronnie and Charlie together onstage seemed to be its own giddy reward. Did the band also want to play a few songs? They did? Fantastic! READ FULL STORY

Fun Fun Fun Fest Austin recap: Run-DMC, Superchunk, and a whole lot of Ryan Gosling

What’s that? You didn’t realize that Austin had another music festival between last month’s Austin City Limits and March’s South By Southwest? Then you, sir or ma’am, are not Terrance Malick. (More on that later.)

This past weekend, Fun Fun Fun Fest — a three-day event with four stages of college-radio royalty, hip-hop heroes, and your cool older brother’s favorite hardcore bands — took over the sunny Texas capital for the seventh year in a row. And while this newish entry to the festival-industrial complex doesn’t yet have the hashtag ubiquity and Tupac holograms of its more established peers, it is able to rope in a reunited Run-DMC, top-shelf comedy, and enough Ryan Gosling appearances to justify its own Tumblr. Also, there was a taco canon. (None on that later.)

And Music Mix was there too. Forthwith, a day-by-day graded run-down of Fun Fun Fun Fest’s highlights. READ FULL STORY

Axl Rose shows up on time, gives Jimmy Kimmel first live TV interview in 20 years -- VIDEO

Guns N’ Roses frontman Axl Rose broke a long streak last night — sitting down for his first live television interview in more than 20 years.

To celebrate his band’s upcoming 12-night residency at the Hard Rock in Las Vegas (which kicks off on Halloween, of course), Rose took over the couch on Jimmy Kimmel Live! to discuss his hitchhiking past, his issues with punctuality, and his personal Halloween tree.

There weren’t a whole lot of revelations during the 12-minute conversation, though there were a handful of funny moments. Kimmel seemed genuinely surprised the interview was even happening — he repeatedly commented on the fact that he didn’t know what to expect and was amazed that Rose appeared at the appropriate time.

His penchant for lateness was a recurring theme: Axl assured concertgoers that the group’s Vegas shows would actually start at the time printed on their tickets, and Kimmel noted that Rose has the Oscar Wilde quote “Punctuality is the thief of time” framed in his house.

The funniest part came when Axl revealed that he had a Halloween tree in his house, which is just like a Christmas tree except for… Halloween-themed. “That’s the most evil thing I’ve ever done,” Rose joked, noting that he mostly used it to taunt kids who come to his house to trick or treat. “I say to them, ‘You mean you don’t have a Halloween tree?'”

Kimmel took some questions from Twitter, including one from a fan who wanted to know what Rose did when he ran offstage (he feels kind of dumb during solos, which is as reasonable an explanation as he could have), and another wondering who Axl was going to vote for. (Sayeth Mr. Rose: “I don’t really vote,” so don’t expect him to show up on any Rock the Vote videos any time soon).

At the end, Rose treated two people in the audience to tickets to the Vegas show, and then invited everybody out for a burger from a truck he had brought with him. Watch the interview below: READ FULL STORY

On the scene: Rob Zombie and Marilyn Manson celebrate Halloween early in New York

About a quarter of the way through his set at New York’s Hammerstein Ballroom on Wednesday night, metal veteran and horror film director Rob Zombie paused to address the audience. “It’s a shame we couldn’t be here on Halloween,” he growled to the crowd. “But we figured it was close enough.”

Zombie could give that same speech every day of the year. Like Marilyn Manson—his co-headliner on what is being touted as the “Twins of Evil Tour”—he’s spent the better part of his life in costume, assuming the role of deranged barker at the center of a carnival obsessed with ancient monster movies, Z-list actresses’ breasts, and the whimsy of the devil himself.

Though the two scary men at the center of each hour-ish–long set may seem interchangeable, their performances were deeply distinct, both sonically and philosophically.  READ FULL STORY

Patti Smith live in L.A. -- still a musical shaman at 65

Back in the mid 1990s, as an 18-year-old college student living in New York City, I saw Patti Smith play her first show in 15 years at downtown punk palace CBGBs.

I was already obsessed with her music and writing — I covered songs from her rebellious, beautiful first album, 1975’s Horses, and had written a poem about her (yes, it was called Homage to Patti Smith). So I gripped a copy of the poem and a red rose to give her before the show, which I did, going back stage and handing them to her silently. She took them both, silently.

Later, pressed up against the stage with a friend, just below her microphone, I saw Smith launch into a three-hour show full of fury, power, sweat, and rock ‘n’ roll. On stage, singing with her arms raised, she tore the rose I gave her to shreds, stuffing half the petals in her pocket, and throwing the other half in the air, letting them shower down like bits of red rain.

To those who love Smith’s music — from the landmark Horses to this year’s Banga, filled with references to Russian literature, her old friend, late French actress Maria Schneider, Amy Winehouse, and 2011’s Japanese earthquake and tsunami — she’s more than a muse. She represents something else: the ability to be emotional, literary, musical, and free outside the confines of age, gender, time, and place;. She’s a constant reminder that soulful, smart music exists beyond the current scope of commercial pop for audiences who crave that kind of sustenance.

At Wednesday night’s intimate, private show at Apogee’s Berkeley Street Studio in Santa Monica for Los Angeles radio station KCRW (it will be broadcast Nov. 14 on the station’s Morning Becomes Eclectic), Smith proved her continued worth as a musician and performer. The crowd consisted of less than 200 people, including stars such as Tom Hanks, Rita Wilson, Tim Robbins, Ed Harris (wearing a fedora pulled over his face), and Ellen Page, who looked just as starry-eyed as everyone else in the packed space. READ FULL STORY

Jay-Z at Brooklyn's Barclays Center opening night: On the scene

If “Drink when you hear the word ‘Brooklyn'” were a game at the inauguration of the brand-new Barclays Center sports arena last night, it might easily have turned fatal by the 30-minute mark.

Thankfully (or not) the venue ran out of alcohol roughly two-thirds of the way through the evening, one of several small kinks in a generally on-point if occasionally underwhelming opening.

That Jay-Z is, to paraphrase his dearly departed friend, not only a Barclays client but the player president, is not news to New Yorkers. The rapper-turned-mogul has a minority ownership stake in the Center and its team, the Brooklyn Nets, and his Hova-ness is an integral part of both its DNA and its marketing plan.

The significance of that stake is clearly not lost on the man himself; multiple times, he stopped his set to acknowledge it in ways both playfully braggy (“This is the house that Hova built. Welcome to my house!”) and nakedly emotional (“Do you mind if I take my time? I’m feeling a little bit overwhelmed by the moment.”) At several points, he stopped to note that this performance meant more to him than any in a long, glittery line of career highlights: More than the Grammys, more than Glastonbury, more than Coachella. READ FULL STORY

Frank Ocean plays NYC synagogue, releases new song 'Blue Whale': Hear it here

R&B “It” boy Frank Ocean is not slowing down.

The man who dropped the summer’s must-album Channel Orange on our unsuspecting heads and lent both Saturday Night Live and John Mayer some cool points earlier this month is diving into the week head first. Following his I’ll Be Your Mirror appearance this weekend, Ocean played a mesmerizing set at New York’s Angel Orensanz Center, the antebellum synagogue where Fader and Vitamainwater held a joint event last night. Bon Iver was technically the headliner, but Ocean seemed to inspire the most excitement, prompting fans to crowd the Gothic Revival building’s delicate balconies for a better view of the night’s headbanded hero.

They were not disappointed. Backed by a Telecaster-wielding band, the singer obligingly launched into spacey Channel Orange favorites like “Crack Rock” and “Bad Religion” (interesting, given the setting) as well as earlier mixtape cuts, like the winding “American Wedding.” He ended his hourish-long run with the seedy Egyptology of “Pyramids,” and it all felt like the weirdly correct way to spend a night in a temple during the Jewish High Holidays.

One song Ocean didn’t play last night? “Blue Whale,” the brand new track he debuted this morning on his Tumblr. It’s a lo-fi number, characteristically mellow and introspective with lines like, “I wasn’t much into the type that my bros liked/So I never really had no wife/And that’s alright.”

Give “Blue Whale” and listen below:

READ FULL STORY

Best Coast performs on Conan - watch it here

LA garage-poppers Best Coast performed “Do You Love Me Like You Used To?” on Conan last night.  The song’s off their second record, The Only Place.

Watch it below and see if you love them like you used to, or for the first time: READ FULL STORY

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