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Tag: An EW Exclusive! (11-20 of 608)

'Voice' star Tony Lucca debuts rollicking rock track, 'Delilah'

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Tony Lucca’s no stranger to TV: He started out on The Micky Mouse Club alongside Justin Timberlake and Christina Aguilera, placed third in The Voice, and had a guest role on NBC’s Parenthood. So it makes sense that his latest song would sound like the perfect soundtrack for a dramatic TV montage.

“Delilah” begins with simple, hypnotic finger-picking and builds throughout, morphing from understated blues to a rollicking, dark piece of Southern rock. “‘Delilah’ is definitely the most enchanted recording on the new album,” Lucca tells EW. “The song became this haunted house, where each track we laid was like another ghost crashing the party.” READ FULL STORY

Hear stylish genre-blurrers Emprss' brand-new single, 'Down'

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Ralph Allan, Leo Crossing, and Johnny Goddard have been making music together since they were teenagers in sleepy Farnham, England. Now in their mid-20s, they’ve fallen in with a wave of young British artists who are blurring the lines between pop, dance music, and R&B to the point where a listener can have a hard time telling where one influence ends and the next begins. In the year or so since they started working on Emprss in earnest, they’ve released a handful of singles and EPs that have inspired a cult following on SoundCloud, and quite a few people wagering they could become the next The xx. Their debut album comes out sometime in the coming months, but in the meantime to mark the start of their UK tour with Hundred Waters they’re releasing a sleek and stylish teaser single called “Down” that should help tip the aura of anticipation surrounding them from “substantial” to “fully ridiculous.”

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Dive into Busdriver's kaleidoscopic 'Motion Lines' video

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L.A. rapper Busdriver has spent the past decade-plus navigating the outer fringes of hip-hop, and his trailblazing efforts have helped to push rap music away from traditional structures and into its current phase of wild sonic experimentation. His latest album, Perfect Hair (out now on Big Dada) features guest appearances by Danny Brown, Aesop Rock, and Open Mike Eagle (as well as cover art by counterculture superhero and former Fishing With John host John Lurie).

But the real star is Busdriver’s inimitable elastic flow, which he twists and stretches to fit beats that refuse to conform to a steady boom-bap. The video for his latest single “Motion Lines” launches the rapper into a kaleidoscopic light show that compliments the song’s jazzily improvised vibe.

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Weaves have a hot new rock song with an NSFW title

Weaves has a slippery sonic identity that can change radically from song to song, turning on a dime from fuzzy electropop to a compellingly weird amalgamation of the B-52’s and UK postpunk to straightforward power pop. It might make for a confusing listen if the group didn’t have frontwoman Jasmyn Burke’s distinctive achey voice to pull it all together, as well as the chops to pull off seemingly whatever style they tackle.

On their latest single—whose title EW style prevents us from publishing in the headline, but which we can tell you here in the body of this post is actually “S–thole”—the Toronto four-piece sounds a little like The Pixies at their proto-grunge best covering a Burger Records stoner-pop song. The single comes out Oct. 20 through Buzz Records.

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Stream Harriet Brown's intensely funky 'New Era' EP

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The music Aaron Valenzuela makes under the name Harriet Brown is stylistically miles away from what the club-kid image he affects might suggest—it has syncopated rhythms and loosely organic instrumentation rather than the four-on-the-floor beats and quantized MIDI tracks. He’s earned every single comparison to Prince that he’s accumulated during his still-young career, and much of his New Era EP has the confidently unhinged quality that helped define the Purple One’s late-’80s material, but it’s far from an exact replica. Like fellow pop auteur Blood Orange, he makes music that’s laced with nostalgia but not reliant upon it, drifting in an ambiguous timeframe somewhere between the near future and the recent past. More importantly, it’s just seriously really funky stuff.

New Era is out tomorrow on the Feel So Real label, but EW has an early look here.

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Prince Rupert's Drops' 'Climbing Light' is mystical retro acid pop

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New York-based quintet Prince Rupert’s Drops is far from the only band right now emulating the sounds of psych rock’s first wave, but they’re one of the few who are trying to get deeper than its surface aesthetics, and striving to represent the psychedelic experience as something more than Sgt. Pepper’s and acid rock posters.

Their new album Climbing Light (out Nov. 11 on Beyond Beyond is Beyond Records) is more Alan Watts than “Mellow Yellow,” adding a slightly scary edge to the Summer of Love-era sounds they’re working with, as befits a journey beyond the veil of mana and into contact with a universe that no human mind can ever fully comprehend. It’s heady stuff, but in PRD’s hands it’s catchy, too—the album’s titular track sounds like The Zombies if they’d recorded a song based on The Tibetan Book of the Dead.

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Lia Mice searches for a lost pet and finds electro bliss in her 'Our Heavy Heart' vid

Lia Mice is an exceptionally peripatetic artist, both geographically and artistically. She started out her music career in punk and soul bands in Australia, relocated to Brooklyn’s noise scene, and finally settled in France, where she now makes music that combines adventurous electronic sounds with a distinctly Gallic brand of clever pop songwriting in the lineage of Serge Gainsbourg and the French yé-yé artists of yore. Her album I Love You comes out Nov. 4 on Old Flame Records, and it’s full of sing-alongable melodies and sonic textures that are easy to lose yourself in. Her latest single, “Our Heavy Heart,” steers the current dream pop revival toward the dance floor with help from a clanging, echo-laden cowbell that almost manages to steal the show from Mice’s shimmering vocals. Its video alternates between shots of her on the street searching for a lost snake and shots of her and the snake dancing together in presumably happier times

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Synths and psychedelia collide on Canopies' 'The Plunderers and the Pillagers'

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Milwaukee electro-psych-pop quintet Canopies have a lot of synthesizers and a lot of patience. Despite the buzzworthiness of their sound, which should resonate with fans of MGMT, the group eschewed the urge to rush into releasing its first album and instead went two solid years with a pile of vintage equipment patiently assembling their debut, Maximize Your Faith (out Dec. 9 on Forged Artifacts).

The payoff to their slow-moving approach is apparent on the intricately layered instrumentation on “The Plunderers and the Pillagers,” which you can spend multiple listens peeling apart to find the nifty little flourishes woven into the mix. Or you could just sit back and enjoy the song’s expansive hooks and crackling energy, which make it an excellent choice for starting off your weekend with a synth-heavy bang.

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Swedish electro-poppers Kate Boy drop 'Open Fire'

In 2011 Kate Akhurst moved from Australia to Stockholm, Sweden in search of musical collaborators with more in common with her aesthetic vision than she could find at home. Producers Hampus Nordgren and Markus Dextegen seem to have fit the bill, bringing a quintessentially Swedish flavor to the electronic arrangements they bring to their group Kate Boy. “Open Fire,” from their upcoming debut LP, has all the sonic ambition of The Knife mixed with pop hooks worthy of Max Martin.

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Brazilian psych-rockers Wannabe Jalva want to take you higher

Brazilian quartet Wannabe Jalva hail from southern Brazil, near the country’s borders with Argentina and Uruguay, and not coincidentally, their music largely forgoes the tropical flavor the country’s best known for in favor of a more sere sonic approach that seems to reflect their proximity to the Pampas. Their latest EP, Collecture (out Oct. 15), offers a compellingly austere take on psych rock that avoids the clichéd gaudiness that often afflicts the form, and brings to mind The Strokes as often as it does Os Mutantes or Pink Floyd. Run through with heavy, Jodorowsky-esque mysticism, the album’s a straight up trip.

“We’ve extracted moods and textures from ourselves and put them out there in an almost collective epiphany,” guitarist Tiago Abrahão emails from Brazil. “Nature comes from the fact that we realized that the right path (the essence) was to lock ourselves in there (in the basement) and just get out when we all felt fulfilled (and, at the same time, empty from those temporarily undefined urges).” Maybe a tough statement to wrap your head around, but once you put Collecture on, it makes more sense than you might expect.

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