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Tag: An EW Exclusive! (41-50 of 642)

Hear the Afghan Whigs demo of 'Debonair,' an exclusive premiere from 'Gentlemen at 21'

The Afghan Whigs’ Gentlemen, originally released in 1993, not only represents the band’s major-label debut, but it’s also the platonic ideal of the group’s sound. Over the course of 11 tracks, the Whigs melded the sultry slink of R&B with the jagged crunch of indie rock, all fueled by frontman Greg Dulli’s sly, savage take on relationships.

On October 27, Rhino will release Gentlemen at 21, a deluxe reissue of the album celebrating the fact that it has finally reached drinking age. In addition to the original remastered album, there are 17 bonus tracks that include a bunch of b-sides, live performances, and the original Gentlemen demos.  READ FULL STORY

Genre-blending German pop duo Milky Chance shares a playlist

“I don’t think we did it consciously,” Milky Chance beat-maker Philip Dausch says of the mix of pop, folk, and house music that’s helped put their “Stolen Dance” on the pop charts in more than a dozen countries. “I think it’s something that we always do instinctually. We are not the persons to kind of have a favorite song or play only one certain genre.”

The German duo, made up of Dausch and songwriter/vocalist/instrumentalist Clemens Rehbein, are flexible musicians—they previously played together in a jazz group—and even more flexible listeners. “We have a good education in music,” says Dausch, “and we always love to play all tunes. We are always interested in a lot of exotic music. We like rap, we like classical, we like jazz, we like pop. We don’t have favorites. We like to put things together.”

Their adventurous listening habits are apparent on their genre-hopping debut LP Sadnecessary, which came out earlier this week. They also come through loud and clear on the exclusive playlist that they created for EW, which includes South African vocal group Ladysmith Black Mambazo, wiggy former Red Hot Chili Peppers guitarist John Frusciante, and shadowy post-dubstep singer-songwriter James Blake.

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Rap duo Moors go spacey and slow-motion with 'Smoke'

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At the moment, the rap duo Moors is best known for being the musical project of actor Keith Stanfield, who appeared in last year’s critically acclaimed Short Term 12 and will play a young Snoop Dogg in the upcoming N.W.A. biopic Straight Outta Compton. But the spaced-out, slow-motion hip-hop that he makes with producer HH, which finds a rich groove somewhere in between Tricky-style trip-hop and Common-style bohemian rap, is easily strong enough to stand on its own.

Moors drop their self-titled debut EP (which features remixes by Postal Service member Dntel and avant-hip-hop producer Daedelus) on Oct. 28 on the Haven Sounds label, and the pair will spend most of November on the road. For now, enjoy an early look at the single “Smoke.”

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Eaves's 'Timber' is sweet, slightly dark folk-pop

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Leeds, England-based singer-songwriter Eaves sounds remarkably mature for an artist who’s only in his early 20s. The three songs on his upcoming Old As the Grave EP forgo the ’90s-style fuzz and postmodern electronic sounds of most buzzy young acts, presenting his songs with bare-minimum arrangements that give his deft melodies and crystal-clear voice plenty of room to breathe. The songs recall low-key folkies from Nick Drake and Fairport Convention to Bon Iver, but Eaves’s emotive vocals and the hint of darkness that he adds to them—even on the lilting piano ballad “Timber”—make them feel bracingly original.

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'Voice' star Tony Lucca debuts rollicking rock track, 'Delilah'

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Tony Lucca’s no stranger to TV: He started out on The Micky Mouse Club alongside Justin Timberlake and Christina Aguilera, placed third in The Voice, and had a guest role on NBC’s Parenthood. So it makes sense that his latest song would sound like the perfect soundtrack for a dramatic TV montage.

“Delilah” begins with simple, hypnotic finger-picking and builds throughout, morphing from understated blues to a rollicking, dark piece of Southern rock. “‘Delilah’ is definitely the most enchanted recording on the new album,” Lucca tells EW. “The song became this haunted house, where each track we laid was like another ghost crashing the party.” READ FULL STORY

Hear stylish genre-blurrers Emprss' brand-new single, 'Down'

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Ralph Allan, Leo Crossing, and Johnny Goddard have been making music together since they were teenagers in sleepy Farnham, England. Now in their mid-20s, they’ve fallen in with a wave of young British artists who are blurring the lines between pop, dance music, and R&B to the point where a listener can have a hard time telling where one influence ends and the next begins. In the year or so since they started working on Emprss in earnest, they’ve released a handful of singles and EPs that have inspired a cult following on SoundCloud, and quite a few people wagering they could become the next The xx. Their debut album comes out sometime in the coming months, but in the meantime to mark the start of their UK tour with Hundred Waters they’re releasing a sleek and stylish teaser single called “Down” that should help tip the aura of anticipation surrounding them from “substantial” to “fully ridiculous.”

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Dive into Busdriver's kaleidoscopic 'Motion Lines' video

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L.A. rapper Busdriver has spent the past decade-plus navigating the outer fringes of hip-hop, and his trailblazing efforts have helped to push rap music away from traditional structures and into its current phase of wild sonic experimentation. His latest album, Perfect Hair (out now on Big Dada) features guest appearances by Danny Brown, Aesop Rock, and Open Mike Eagle (as well as cover art by counterculture superhero and former Fishing With John host John Lurie).

But the real star is Busdriver’s inimitable elastic flow, which he twists and stretches to fit beats that refuse to conform to a steady boom-bap. The video for his latest single “Motion Lines” launches the rapper into a kaleidoscopic light show that compliments the song’s jazzily improvised vibe.

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Weaves have a hot new rock song with an NSFW title

Weaves has a slippery sonic identity that can change radically from song to song, turning on a dime from fuzzy electropop to a compellingly weird amalgamation of the B-52′s and UK postpunk to straightforward power pop. It might make for a confusing listen if the group didn’t have frontwoman Jasmyn Burke’s distinctive achey voice to pull it all together, as well as the chops to pull off seemingly whatever style they tackle.

On their latest single—whose title EW style prevents us from publishing in the headline, but which we can tell you here in the body of this post is actually “S–thole”—the Toronto four-piece sounds a little like The Pixies at their proto-grunge best covering a Burger Records stoner-pop song. The single comes out Oct. 20 through Buzz Records.

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Stream Harriet Brown's intensely funky 'New Era' EP

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The music Aaron Valenzuela makes under the name Harriet Brown is stylistically miles away from what the club-kid image he affects might suggest—it has syncopated rhythms and loosely organic instrumentation rather than the four-on-the-floor beats and quantized MIDI tracks. He’s earned every single comparison to Prince that he’s accumulated during his still-young career, and much of his New Era EP has the confidently unhinged quality that helped define the Purple One’s late-’80s material, but it’s far from an exact replica. Like fellow pop auteur Blood Orange, he makes music that’s laced with nostalgia but not reliant upon it, drifting in an ambiguous timeframe somewhere between the near future and the recent past. More importantly, it’s just seriously really funky stuff.

New Era is out tomorrow on the Feel So Real label, but EW has an early look here.

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Prince Rupert's Drops' 'Climbing Light' is mystical retro acid pop

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New York-based quintet Prince Rupert’s Drops is far from the only band right now emulating the sounds of psych rock’s first wave, but they’re one of the few who are trying to get deeper than its surface aesthetics, and striving to represent the psychedelic experience as something more than Sgt. Pepper’s and acid rock posters.

Their new album Climbing Light (out Nov. 11 on Beyond Beyond is Beyond Records) is more Alan Watts than “Mellow Yellow,” adding a slightly scary edge to the Summer of Love-era sounds they’re working with, as befits a journey beyond the veil of mana and into contact with a universe that no human mind can ever fully comprehend. It’s heady stuff, but in PRD’s hands it’s catchy, too—the album’s titular track sounds like The Zombies if they’d recorded a song based on The Tibetan Book of the Dead.

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