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Tag: An EW Exclusive! (41-50 of 569)

Buffalo Clover unveils slow-burning ballad 'Hey Child'

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Buffalo Clover is a Southern six-piece that blends vintage rock and soul influences in a way that makes them sound sort of like the Band, if instead of breaking up after The Last Waltz the Band had just turned the whole guest-star-filled soiree into an ongoing supergroup. On August 12, the group is releasing two albums, a studio record called Test Your Love and a live album called Live at Five recorded at Nashville’s The Five Spot.

The former album will feature “Hey Child,” a smoldering soul ballad dedicated to a child that the group’s founders and primary songwriters, Margo Price and Jeremy Ivey, lost to a rare heart condition soon after he was born in 2010. READ FULL STORY

How did Samm Levine of 'Freaks and Geeks' end up in Ice Cube's 'Drop Girl' video?

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There’s a lot going on in the just-released music video for Ice Cube’s “Drop Girl,” the latest single from his forthcoming album Everythang’s Corrupt: The giant heads of Cube and his collaborators RedFoo and 2 Chainz, more than a few female derrieres, and… Wait, is that Neal from Freaks and Geeks?

That is in fact Samm Levine as the lead scientist handling research on ladies’ behinds. “The truth of the matter is that anyone who knows me in my personal life knows that finding the perfect booty is something I’m deeply concerned with and have been for years,” Levine tells EW. “I actually run a lab out of my basement. Everyone there is a volunteer, they come on their own volition. When they asked if they could shoot the music video there, I had no problem with it. It was really more of a documentary than anything else.” READ FULL STORY

Watch previously unreleased Woodstock footage of Crosby, Stills & Nash

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The Oscar-winning 1970 concert documentary Woodstock celebrated its 40th anniversary a few years ago, but Warner Bros. is already re-revisiting. The new three-disc Blu-ray set, fittingly titled Woodstock 40th Anniversary Limited Edition Revisited, features the film’s four-hour director’s cut, two discs of extras, and a souvenir pack filled with reproductions of articles on the concert from Life magazine and The New York Times, a pair of reproduction concert tickets, and an embroidered iron-on patch with the classic dove-and-guitar logo.

While 40 years seems like a long time for footage from the festival to remain unreleased–especially when you consider that nostalgia for Woodstock seems to have kicked in before everyone had even exited the grounds–the set features a clutch of previously un-issued performances from some of the lineup’s biggest names (as well as Sha Na Na). Here’s an exclusive look at one such clip, of Crosby, Stills & Nash singing their classic “Helplessly Hoping”: READ FULL STORY

Watch El May's NYC-centric video for 'I Played a Role'

For the first video from her forthcoming sophomore album, The Other Person Is You, singer-songwriter Lara Meyerratken, aka El May, took to the streets of New York City with director Yaara Sumeruk. The Australian musician brought along a pair of headphones and an iPhone loaded with her bouncy, dancehall-infused single “I Played a Role” and captured the reactions of people on the street hearing the track for the first time. Like Meyerratken, the song and the video’s conceit are fun and more than a little cutesy without crossing over into full-blown twee quirkiness.

“The train scene was our dream come true,” Meyerratken, who resides in L.A., writes in an email. “We had imagined a best-case scenario, where our journey around the city over the two days coincided with some amazing subway dancers. At the end of the day, headed to our final locations, exhausted on the J train, we heard the famous call: ‘SHOW TIME!’ So we approached them… it turned out to be a real highlight!”

The Other Person Is You, which features contributions from indie rock royalty like the Vaselines’ Eugene Kelly and Britta Phillips and Dean Wareham from Luna, is out Aug. 26.

Hear Yawn's psych-rocking new track 'Flytrap'

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Yawn is an electronics-heavy pop band who has spent the past five years building up a reputation in the Chicago DIY scene, and the band is starting to ease its way up aboveground. Last year, they played Lollapalooza, and this year they’re releasing their second album, Love Chills, with an immediately catchy lead single.

Like the rest of the LP, “Flytrap” was recorded in the band’s live-in studio, which was formerly occupied by the bro-metal band Disturbed (of “Down With the Sickness” fame), and its combination of swaggering fuzztone riffs and trippy electronic flourishes sound like something that will land them a nice spot on the festival circuit.

Love Chills is out September 9 on Old Flame.

Chippy Nonstop unveils her dirty-cute single 'Peeka'

Rapper and burgeoning pop star Chippy Nonstop resides in Los Angeles, but it might be more accurate to say she lives on the Internet, where she’s amassed an army of fans on Twitter and other social networking platforms through virally popular singles like “Money Dance” and “Kicked Out Da Club.” The latter single perfectly sums up both her sound (club rap with an emphasis on regional styles like Bay Area hyphy) and her philosophy (which is YOLO to the extreme).

Her latest single is called “Peeka,” which pairs a buzzy, bass-heavy beat with pitch-shifted vocals that use the name of the most popular Pokemon character as a euphemism for a very non-G-rated act. She says that it was recorded in just one day, and that, “I want my fans to have this song for the summer time to dance outside their homes in the sprinklers in.” As I write this, those fans are feverishly posting memes in anticipation of its release, so without further ado, here it is.

White Arrows get electro-psychedelic with 'We Can't Ever Die'

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Los Angeles quintet White Arrows are indie rockers with big pop ambitions and a whole bunch of synthesizers. This combination has earned them spots on tours with taste-making bands like Cults and White Denim and slots at big festivals like Coachella and Sasquatch. After several years of touring behind their debut album, Dry Land Is Not A Myth, they’ve finally followed it up with In Bardo, out Sept. 16 on Votiv. On the lead single, “We Can’t Ever Die,” funky, disco-inflected verses segue smoothly into arena-worthy hooks that sound like a modern, not-annoying reincarnation of U2, with the whole thing decorated with burbling 8-bit-style synths. They’re on tour with the Neighbourhood and Danny Brown through the end of the month.

Hear Claude VonStroke's acid-drenched banger 'CaliFuture'

Claude VonStroke has spent the decade pushing dance music’s boundaries while maintaining a strong link to the style’s roots, something a lot of bigger EDM acts just don’t have. On his latest, “CaliFuture,” he fuses the gnarly, squelching synths of vintage Chicago acid house with a funky vocal line that sounds like it could have been lifted right off some super-rare ’80s electro 12-inch.

“I moved to California over 17 years ago with big dreams just like everyone else,” VonStroke says of the song’s lyrical theme. “Originally I thought I would be a filmmaker but I was always better at music. I worked every job from fake perfume salesman to tour guide at Paramount. I got screamed at for many years by Ari Gold-type movie producers but always with a blind belief that someday something good would happen. That’s what this song is about: the underlying belief that no matter how bad it is, you can be plucked out of oblivion and make it big in California.”

“CaliFuture” is available now on Beatport.

READ FULL STORY

Salme Dahlstrom premieres 'Pop Ur Heart Out'

You may not recognize Salme Dahlstrom’s name, but it’s very likely that you’ve heard her song “C’mon Y’all” in a commercial (for everything from Special K to Subaru), a movie, a TV show, or a video game. Or you may have heard another song from her 2008 album The Acid Cowgirl Audio Trade somewhere, since she managed to license every single track on it, Moby-style.

The follow-up to Acid Cowgirl, titled Pop Propaganda Volume 2: Retro Funk Soul Junction, comes out September 16—and if the lead single, “Pop Ur Heart Out” is any indication, she won’t have problem selling these songs either. “Pop”—which Dahlstrom produced herself, like all her material—is relentlessly hooky and ridiculously accessible, with bits of hip-hop and dance music floating around in a matrix of straight sugar pop. Expect to see it in about a million more commercials.

READ FULL STORY

Hear Justin Townes Earle's contribution to an all-star Springsteen tribute

There is a certain kind of Springsteen fan who loves the songs on his 30-million-selling Born in the U.S.A. but can’t stand the album’s highly polished, synthesizer-heavy sheen. That type of fan should be thrilled about the upcoming tribute compilation Dead Man’s Town, out Sept. 16, where a cast of roots-rock luminaries, including North Mississippi Allstars, Low, Nicole Atkins, Blitzen Trapper, Joe Pug, and Trampled by Turtles, offer a stripped-down song-by-song reimagining of Born in the U.S.A. that aims to replicate some of the powerful intimacy of its predecessor, 1982’s Nebraska.

Outlaw country scion Justin Townes Earle is involved, which shouldn’t be too surprising to anyone familiar with his habit of covering Springsteen songs and also of appearing pretty much anywhere rootsy, acoustic-based rock music is being made. For Dead Man’s Town, he gives a bare-bones rendition of “Glory Days” that peels back the original’s feel-good bar-band sound to highlight the small-town pathos at its core. We have the first listen here.

READ FULL STORY

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