The Music Mix Music news, reviews, albums, concerts, and downloads

Tag: Anniversaries (1-6 of 6)

AC/DC: Band says ailing guitarist Malcolm Young is 'taking a break'

In response to a week-long swirl of retirement rumors and speculation on the health of its members, AC/DC has made an official statement:

After forty years of life dedicated to AC/DC, guitarist and founding member Malcolm Young is taking a break from the band due to ill health. Malcolm would like to thank the group’s diehard legions of fans worldwide for their never-ending love and support. In light of this news, AC/DC asks that Malcolm and his family’s privacy be respected during this time. The band will continue to make music.  READ FULL STORY

Nine Inch Nails' 'The Downward Spiral': 20 years of filth and fury

Though I had dipped in and out of MTV throughout the late ’80s and early ’90s, tuning in for the manic kitsch of Remote Controlthe clever smarm of The Half-Hour Comedy Hour, and the occasional Skid Row video, I didn’t really go all in on the network—and thus music videos—until 1994. I had become deeply invested in the narrative running through the third season of The Real World, which was the great San Francisco-based slobberknocker between Pedro and Puck. That show became the only thing people talked about during middle school study halls, so I immersed myself in one of the earliest revolutionary reality shows, and often stuck around for the videos.

I have vivid memories of sitting in the dark in my living room after my parents had gone to bed, watching clip after clip on the network (this was still the era when a Saturday night meant several consecutive hours of music videos shown under various umbrellas). A handful of those videos from that year stuck with me, simply because they were in such heavy rotation: Nirvana’s Unplugged performance of “All Apologies,” Smashing Pumpkins’ sci-fi clip for “Rocket,”  Soudgarden’s terrifying “Black Hole Sun,” and the Beastie Boys’ kinetic ’70s cop show homage “Sabotage.” (There was also the always-playing clip for Janet Jackson’s “Any Time, Any Place,” which I found boring at the time but now I find cripplingly sexy.)

But only one video really mattered to me, and that was Nine Inch Nails’ “Closer.” READ FULL STORY

On the 30th anniversary of the release of 'Scarface,' hear Giorgio Moroder's new remix of 'Tony's Theme' - EXCLUSIVE

scarface-single.jpg

Dance music legend Giorgio Moroder has spent the better part of 2013 looking back. He explored his own biography with the help of some French robots on Daft Punk’s “Giorgio By Moroder,” from the Grammy-nominated Random Access Memories, and remixed Donna Summer’s “Love To Love You Baby” (a song he initially built in 1975) for an album commemorating the late disco diva.

Now he’s remixed himself once again, this time taking the digital scalpel to “Tony’s Theme,” from one of Moroder’s finest film scores: Scarface, which hit theaters exactly 30 years ago today.

In a conversation today with EW, Moroder remembere getting the call from director Brian De Palma about the project and creating the now-legendary score for Al Pacino’s Tony Montana, one of cinema’s most iconic gangsters. “I wanted something a little bit mysterious, because this character is very complex and kind of mysterious coming from Cuba,” Moroder recalls.

“I wanted it to have a little bit of a classical feel in the sequence of the chords. The idea came from a German half-classical singer called Klaus Nomi. He had one song where he did a very high voice, a staccato, a little bit like Laurie Anderson on ‘O Superman.’ Those two songs kind of inspired me, so I came up with the chords and then brought in the big choir and strings and all the rest.”

The new remix of “Tony’s Theme” is more of a complete reinvention — Moroder did not use any of the original tracks to construct the new song. That points to the tune’s versatility. “It works quite well with a big orchestra, and it works quite well with just a piano,” he said. “There’s one section [in the movie] when Tony kills someone, and there I played kind of soft; I think it’s just a bass line. So it works well both big and small.”

Check out the exclusive premiere of Moroder’s new remix of “Tony’s Theme” below.  READ FULL STORY

Fast talking at the end of the world: 15 thoughts on hip-hop's 1998 middle age

Just last week, one of the topics on EW Radio was the number of genre-defining hip-hop albums hitting their twentieth anniversaries this year.

Snoop Doggy Dogg’s Doggystyle, Wu-Tang Clan’s Enter The Wu-Tang (36 Chambers), A Tribe Called Quest’s Midnight Marauders, and Salt-N-Pepa’s Very Necessary all just wrapped their second decade. Those all represent different corners of the rap universe, and they all point to a crucial moment when hip-hop became such an overwhelming presence that mainstream culture had no choice but to move in its direction, rather than the other way around. The success of Dr. Dre’s The Chronic, which dropped in late ’92, started the trend, and it reached its apotheosis with the one-two punch of Notorious B.I.G.’s 1994 debut Ready to Die and Tupac’s 1995 crossover smash Me Against the World.

Plenty of rap records had found their way to the upper echelon of the charts, though they were primarily pandering or novelty tracks (in ’92, both Kriss Kross’ “Jump” and Sir Mix-A-Lot’s “Baby Got Back” became Hot 100 chart toppers). The albums from ’93 were purer hip-hop, and they were crafted by fantastically charismatic characters who were singular in their delivery and presentation. The success of Doggystyle was particularly jaw-dropping—listening to that album 20 years on, it still packs an incredible impact both as a unique piece of pop music and as a remarkably dirty statement of purpose.

Those albums are unimpeachable classics, and by design there’s not a whole lot more to add to that conversation. So let’s fast-forward five years to the albums from late ’98 that are now turning 15 years old. They represent a strange middle age for hip-hop, as its dominance on the pop chart began to be taken for granted and just about everybody began to lose their way.

There are plenty of notable big-ticket rap records from 1998’s fourth quarter, and none of them are classics. It could even be argued that not a single one of them is any good. But they do represent a culture in transition, and it’s a fascinating look at where hip-hop was and how it managed to get to the place it is now. So on the 15th anniversary of Busta Rhymes’ E.L.E. (Extinction Level Event): The Final World Front, Method Man’s Tical 2000: Judgment Day, Mystikal’s Ghetto Fabulous, Ice Cube’s War & Peace Volume 1: The War Disc, RZA’s Bobby Digital In Stereo, DMX’s Flesh of My Flesh, Blood of My Blood, Juvenile’s 400 Degreez, and Redman’s Doc’s Da Name 2000, here are 15 thoughts on the 15th anniversary of a weird time for hip-hop.

1. Everybody totally thought Y2K was going to be a real thing
For anybody too young or too unborn to remember Y2K, it seems utterly ridiculous. READ FULL STORY

Death Cab For Cutie's 'Transatlanticism' turns 10 -- looking back at a classic indie-rock album

DEATH-CAB-TRANSATLANTICISM.jpg

Earlier this year, the Postal Service celebrated the 10-year anniversary of its landmark one-off album Give Up

That album still holds up remarkably well, but it’s unfair to talk about Give Up without discussing frontman Ben Gibbard’s other landmark accomplishment from 2003: Death Cab For Cutie’s Transatlanticism, which came out a decade ago today.

The creation of Transatlanticism is not as romantic as the long-distance construction of the Postal Service’s Give Up, but Gibbard was working on both albums simultaneously, and it’s fair to think of the two as bookends; though there are thematic and tonal crossovers, they come from two very different places.

“Strangely, I don’t think the two records have much to do with each other as far as the emotional tone,” Gibbard told EW earlier this year. “I felt like I could shift pretty seamlessly between working on Postal Service and then turning around and writing a Death Cab song.” Gibbard allowed the tracks that Postal Service collaborator Jimmy Tamborello was sending him to dictate the emotional tone of the songs themselves, while Transatlanticism is the product of Death Cab’s collective hive mind.

READ FULL STORY

Whitney Houston would have been 50 years old today

It’s been nearly a year and a half since pop music lost one of the biggest, purest voices it ever had.

There’s not much that hasn’t been said about Whitney Houston’s life and legacy since she died suddenly (though maybe not entirely unexpectedly) on Feb. 11, 2012. But it’s always worth revisiting her music — you can find EW’s essential Whitney playlist here, as well as a video collection and career-spanning photo gallery, or just dig into the countless tributes online.

To honor this day specifically, there’s a new Whitney-centric comic book — kind of odd, but well intentioned — and Sirius XM is hosting day-long special on their Heart & Soul channel, featuring some two decades of her music, plus remembrances from friends and family (including Cissy Houston, Pat Houston, Dionne Warwick, Clive Davis, Chaka Khan, and R. Kelly).

Readers, will you be remembering Whitney in your own way today? Let us know in the comments.

Latest Videos in Music

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP