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Tag: Attack of the '90s (31-40 of 90)

What is the most '90s movie soundtrack of all time?

Last weekend, I stumbled across my new favorite blog on the Internet.

It’s written by a dude named Chris who is on an ongoing quest to decide which film released between 1990 and 1999 is the most ’90s movie of all time. He uses a handful of rotating criteria, like whether or not the plot of the film could be executed using today’s technology and social customs, the extreme ’90s-ness of the fashion, the use of outdated technology (like pagers and gigantic laptops), and whether the stars of the film are inextricably linked to the decade.

“The Quest” has been going on for a year, but I was so enamored of the idea that I ran through dozens of posts in a single afternoon, internally debating the merits of the scoring system and trying to decide whether or not Angelina Jolie is tethered to any particular era (and even if she isn’t, Hackers is still a paragon of ’90s-ness).

Top scoring entries so far include Don’t Tell Mom the Babysitter’s Dead (major points based on the impossibility of the plot in today’s technological landscape), Clueless (obvious nods to several different levels of fashion as well as the Mighty Mighty Bosstones), and Encino Man (a winner just based on the presence of Pauly Shore, perhaps the most ’90s a person has ever been).

That walk down memory lane appealed to me not only because I have so many personal memories tied up in movies like Happy Gilmore, Mallrats, and I Know What You Did Last Summer, but also because ’90s film soundtracks are about the only compact discs I still buy.

Whenever I’m in a used record store (especially in a city I’ve never visited), my first stop is always the soundtracks, where incredible relics like Twister and Batman Forever live in permanently unloved rotation. I’ve amassed a pretty thorough collection that acts as a remarkable summation of the times — especially the ones that were clearly curated to appeal to fans of the associated movies (and the ones that weren’t are even more mind-blowing).

So naturally, I started thinking: What ’90s movie soundtrack is the most ’90s? READ FULL STORY

Greg Dulli on curating All Tomorrow's Parties, getting the Afghan Whigs back together, and why Louis C.K. is like a pretty girl

Greg Dulli has spent the first decade and a half of the 21st century as the mastermind behind the Twilight Singers and the Gutter Twins, dressing up after-hours reveries in blues riffage, goth leanings, and tales of love gone awry. But that footprint began back in the ’90s with the Afghan Whigs, his cultishly-adored group of funk-loving, soul-stealing rockers from Cincinnati.

That band called it quits nearly 15 years ago, and now Dulli has reconstituted the group, which will make its grand return at this year’s All Tomorrow’s Parties festival in Asbury Park, New Jersey—an event that Dulli also happens to be curating.

In addition to the Whigs, his eclectic lineup includes the Roots, stand-up comic Louis C.K., Sharon Van Etten, Godspeed You! Black Emperor, and frequent collaborator Mark Lanegan. We spoke with Dulli about the reunion, the festival, and the haze of the ’90s.

EW: Which came first: The reunion or the call to curate All Tomorrow’s Parties?
Dulli: The best way I can describe it is that it was sort of a perfect storm of events. I did an acoustic tour a year and a half ago and John Curley, my dear friend and bass player in the Whigs, joined me for the show in Cincinnati, which we’ve done before when I pass through there. But then, I asked him, “Do you want to come up to Chicago and play?” He came up to Chicago and people freaked out. I finished up that tour on the west coast and I called him and I was like, “Hey man, do you want to do the west coast with me?” And he said yes. That was a great time. At that point, we began to play a few more Whigs songs in the show and I really enjoyed it. I rediscovered some songs that I had forgotten about and how much I enjoyed playing them. Then, when the Twilights tour last spring, we played Minneapolis where [Afghan Whigs guitarist] Rick [McCollum] lives. I had lunch with Rick. I hadn’t seen Rick in three or four years. We didn’t even talk about playing together but we had a really nice time at lunch. Then, he came to the gig and hung out. We were never at odds anyway so we didn’t have to get over any animosity. There were no hatchets to be buried. So when [All Tomorrow's Parties founder] Barry Hogan came around this last time was like, “Hey, do you want to?” I’m like, “Maybe.” My stance had just softened on the hardline and it seemed like if we were ever going to do it, this seemed like the right time to do it.

This can’t be the first time somebody has floated that idea. READ FULL STORY

Fiona Apple returns to the stage with new songs at SXSW

It’s been over 15 years since the lovely angst of Fiona Apple’s debut album Tidal swept through the pop world and made her both an instant sensation and a lightning rod (see: this video) for controversy.

Since then the singer has moved in — and more often, out — of the public sphere, weathering both personal heartbreak and professional woe while wending her way to another album with a really long title, due this spring.

Apple has hardly been onstage since she toured for Extraordinary Machine in 2007, making her set at Stubb’s BBQ in Austin, as part of South by Southwest, a pretty high-stakes coming-out party. And accordingly, her early-evening set attracted a massive throng of curious onlookers, most of whom seemed to have a tremendous amount of emotional baggage tied up in Apple’s early work.

So is the old Fiona back for good? READ FULL STORY

Marilyn Manson returns with new single 'No Reflection': Is he still scary?

Marilyn Manson is back with a new album called Born Villain, and the first single “No Reflection” just dug itself out of a shallow grave to walk the Earth.

Manson hasn’t been gone for very long (the band’s last album, The High End of Low, came out in 2009), but it has been a while since he has been a significant part of the pop culture conversation. The last time the group’s titular singer made a big impact was with 2003′s The Golden Age of Grotesque, and even then it seemed like the seams were showing and the decline was inevitable (though it should be noted that The Golden Age of Grotesque is wildly underrated, with a number of never-were anthems like “Ka-Boom Ka-Boom”).

There was also a moment when the video for “Heart-Shaped Glasses” looked like the return of scandalous Manson, but it was processed by the online news machine in a day and pretty much never heard from again. Considering the relatively small venues booked on Marilyn Manson’s upcoming tour, they seem closer to becoming the door-to-door fear factory once lampooned in The Onion.

But is “No Reflection” the way back for Manson, both the band and the man? The guitars are still loud, the beat still propulsive, and the chorus pretty melodic. Give it a listen below. READ FULL STORY

Fred Durst did it all for the karaoke: Watch him perform his own song 'Nookie' at a bar

Did you know that Limp Bizkit put out their big comeback album in 2011? It’s true! It was called Gold Cobra and had a single called “Shotgun” that EW wasn’t particularly fond of.

The band hadn’t released an album in six years, and it was supposed to be the triumphant return for a group who, for better or for worse, set the tone for mainstream rock at the turn of the century.

Gold Cobra didn’t return Limp Bizkit to the days of red hats and arson, and if you need an apt metaphor for its failure, you need look no further than frontman Fred Durst’s visit to Rock & Reilly’s in Los Angeles on Monday night, where he got on the microphone and did a beatbox-assisted karaoke version of “Nookie,” his band’s signature hit from 1999′s Significant Other. Take a look below. READ FULL STORY

One Direction and Big Time Rush set to tour the US; Are boy bands officially back? -- EXCLUSIVE PHOTO

One-Direction-and-Big-Time-Rush

Two weeks from today, Nickelodeon boy band Big Time Rush will launch its Better With U tour in Las Vegas, and starting one week after that (in Chicago on February 24), they will be joined by some very special guests: One Direction.

EW has obtained an exclusive photo of the two bands together and ready to tour the country. (Wishing all nine gents could be on your desktop? Click HERE for a full-size image.)

Are you by chance unfamiliar with One Direction? That’s likely to change. The British fivesome, constructed by Simon Cowell during The X-Factor UK‘s 2010 season, has already taken the motherland by storm — their first single “What Makes You Beautiful” became the most pre-ordered single in Sony Music’s history — but now they’re teaming up with Big Time Rush to launch a Stateside career. READ FULL STORY

RuPaul: The Soundtrack of My Life

The First Lady of “ladies” and fierce hostess of the breakout reality hit RuPaul’s Drag Race — whose fourth season premieres Monday, Jan. 30, at 9 p.m. on Logo — shares the songs that shaped him, from Donna Summer’s “MacArthur Park” to Bruce Springsteen’s “Dancing in the Dark.”

Song I first dragged to: Donna Summer, “MacArthur Park”
“I was lead singer of a band and lip-syncing to a song was not something that I did, I just wasn’t into it. But I went to this house party in Merrick, New York, and these rich kids asked if I would lip sync a song, so I did it. It was hilarious and it was a smash hit, and I actually used it as part of my repertoire when I did start lip-syncing in the late ’80s in New York.”

Song I’ll never drag to again: Starpoint, “Object of My Desire”
“It’s a great drag song, but its just that there are so many lyrics to it and so many ad libs that she does, it’s almost impossible to get them all and that’s a big consideration with lip-syncing a song. You want to hit every beat, every ad lib, every riff. I tried doing that song once, and I just couldn’t do it.”

Song that reminds me of my first romance: Bell & James, “Livin’ It Up (Friday Night)”
“It was the song that was always on the radio in the disco era, when I was going to this all-ages disco in San Diego. It reminds me of that time and this first real kiss that I had with this man who was much older than me. Actually, when he kissed me, my knees literally buckled. They buckled because I was swept away. Yeah, it was true: He swept me off my feet. When I hear that song today, I immediately think of that kiss.”

READ FULL STORY

Pulp announces more U.S. dates on first Stateside tour in 14 years

The announcement of the full Coachella lineup a few weeks ago was a double-edged sword for fans of Pulp, the iconic Brit-pop band who fashion-rock tunes about rave drugs, the British class system, and Gen X ennui barred them from any substaintial Stateside success but still made them cult heroes here.

On the one hand, it was exciting to know that after reforming last year, they would finally be making their way to the U.S. On the other hand, was it going to take a trip to the desert to sing along with frontman Jarvis Cocker on the chorus of “Disco 2000″?

Luckily, the band heard the cries from people in two other cities, and this morning they announced that they’ll be playing an additional pair of shows in the U.S., which makes four sets total if you count the two weekends at Coachella.

The new dates will take them to New York City’s Radio City Music Hall on April 11 and to San Francisco’s Warfield on April 17. The New York show will be the band’s first sojourn to the United States since 1998, when they went on a brief tour in support of their 1998 album This Is Hardcore.

While they never scored any charting hits in the U.S., Pulp’s influence runs deep. READ FULL STORY

Watch vintage footage of teenage Kanye rapping -- VIDEO

Teen Kanye RapsHe wasn’t born on the throne.

But according to a newly unearthed video of a 19-year-old Kanye West performing in his native Chicago, he was already on his way in 1996.

“I never been tookin’ out / I got emcees lookin’ out,” raps the nascent Louis Vuitton Don, sporting the kind of tucked-in polo ensemble that became the sartorial signature of his earlier days.

The NYC-flavored jam definitely fits the era, and West had seemingly yet to nail down a musical identity. Yet, as we recently learned in another vintage video, it would be eight years (if not sooner) before ‘Ye started infusing into his verses the Chicago-style consciousness that colored his 2004 debut The College Dropout.

But enough with the talking — watch the video for yourself below, and let us know what you think of Junior Yeezy:

READ FULL STORY

December's 'VH1 Divas' adds Chaka, Eryka, Estelle, and -- yes -- some boys

Divas, make way! VH1 has added a bevy of other ladies — and, yes, some dudes, too — to the line-up for its annual special VH1 Divas, including Chaka Kahn (pictured here), Erykah Badu, Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, Estelle, Marsha Ambrosius. The non-diva entities –i.e. those who have a Y chromosome — added include Boyz II Men and Travie McCoy.

The seven new acts join the previously announced divas, which include Kelly Clarkson, Mary J. Blige, Florence Welch, Jennifer Hudson, Jessie J, and Jill Scott. The Roots will serve as the house band for the engagement.

VH1 Divas will celebrate soul this year, honoring so-called “soulful cities” — Chicago, Detroit, London, Memphis, and Philadelphia — that inspired the participating divas and their art. The special airs Monday, Dec. 19, at 9 p.m. on VH1.

Tanner on Twitter: @EWTanStransky

The Music Mix on Twitter: @EWMusicMix

Read more:
‘VH1 Divas’: See Kelly Clarkson’s promotional poster — EXCLUSIVE
Kelly Clarkson, Mary J. Blige, Florence Welch, and Jennifer Hudson to headline this year’s ‘VH1 Divas’

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