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Tag: Buzzworthy (11-20 of 626)

Category-defying electronic producer David Heartbreak made us a bananas playlist

David Heartbreak is something of a DJ’s DJ, and he counts among his biggest fans dance music luminaries like Diplo, Brodinski, and Skrillex, who went so far as to sign him to his own OWSLA label and release his new LP Rose Colored Bass. But as electronic music continues to dismantle the distinctions between genres his blend of EDM, hip-hop, reggae, and whatever else catches his ear seems more and more likely to put him on a level with his better-known supporters.

Recently he took a break from wowing the world’s biggest DJ’s to put together an EW playlist that shows off the breadth of his listening habits, covering everything from deconstructed hip-hop to classic rock. Like Rose Colored Bass it just begs to be put on repeat.

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Stream an EP of cathartic synthpop by L.A. duo Radar Cult

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These days you can barely swing a MIDI controller without hitting a synthpop band, but LA duo Radar Cult sets itself apart from an increasingly crowded field not only by tapping into the slightly menacing analog tones of vintage John Carpenter scores, but by infusing their music with real emotion.

The pair have their debut LP scheduled for release next year on the Plug Research label. In the meantime, they’re putting out a five-song EP called Splitting that sounds like Erasure writing notes to an unrequited love on an overcast day. It’s due out Nov. 25, and EW has an exclusive first listen below.

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Venus and the Moon channel songs from celestial bodies

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Los Angeles has been reconnecting with its hippie past a lot in recent months with the revival of a mystically tinged folk sound that’s as much a part of the city’s sonic identity as glam metal and g-funk. Frally Hynes and Rain Phoenix (who is, yes, Joaquin’s sister) have added their voices to the movement with their new project Venus and the Moon, playing something they call “galactic country” that blends delicate Laurel Canyon melodies and gentle psychedelia infused with crystalline cosmic energy.

Before setting out on a string of European dates with Cat Power, the pair gave EW some insight into what they’re about (and a playlist too).

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Pusha T drops Kanye West-produced 'Lunch Money'

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It’s a testament to Pusha T’s magnetism that he can rap about exactly one topic and still get people going crazy every time he drops a track. He just unveiled his latest, the Kanye West-produced “Lunch Money,” and like every single other King Push song ever, it’s about the craziness of being a former cocaine dealer turned international rap superstar, and like an almost unbelievably large percentage of them, it’s completely bananas and worth rewinding at least two or three times on the first spin.

West’s beat hints at where he’s headed post-Yeezus, trading in the impenetrably dark industrial minimalism he’s been on for burbling prog rock synthesizers and funky stomping drums. The track hit the Internets without any explanation about whether or not it’s part of a new release, but if Pusha’s got a sequel to My Name Is My Name up his sleeve, fans of clanging beats and a seemingly limitless series of cocaine metaphors could have reason to celebrate.

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A runaway bride stars in buzzy electro duo Phantoms' 'Broken Halo' video

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Vinnie and Kyle, the two members of LA electronic group Phantoms (who both go by their first names alone), have funky, synth-heavy music in their blood. Vinnie’s dad was a rhythm guitarist who played in funk bands back in the ’60s, and Kyle’s uncle played keys for Michael Jackson.

The pair were formerly actors, “doing TV movie work and stuff like that,” Kyle says. “As a side project, we always wanted to make music together.”

“Originally we wanted to make this funk rock group,” Vinnie adds, “and eventually it formed into this electronic project because we fell in love with the genre.” READ FULL STORY

Up-and-coming rapper Pell explains where he's going and what he's listening to

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The rapper Pell hails from New Orleans, but his style has little in common with the syrup-swilling sound that most rap fans associate with the city. His new album Floating While Dreaming mixes the ongoing cloud rap trend with a heavy shot of organic Native Tongues vibes and more than a few hints at the young MC’s affection for indie rock, including a single that features indie crooner Dent May on the hook.

“The style is just 100 percent me,” he tells EW. “I like to think in some capacities I’m ahead of the curve. I can make something classic and timeless but still catch the ears of the youth and the people who are looking for a hit single. Something that’s relatable right now. A lot of people out right now are trying to talk about something different from what they’re doing, and it’s easily transparent to the listeners. Nine times out of 10, the ones that are respected for these braggadocious lyrics are talking about lives that aren’t even theirs.”

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Hear Tom Brosseau's elegantly folky 'Roll Along With Me'

Tom Brosseau calls the song “Roll Along With Me” the standout representative track of his new LP Perfect Abandon. Recorded with one microphone on “a vacant theater stage in Bristol, UK” with PJ Harvey collaborator John Parish, its stripped-down arrangements and expertly unpolished production give plenty of room for Brosseau’s featherlight folky melodies and intimately narrative lyrics.

“A simple riff that came about while watching a baseball documentary,” he says of the song. “Old habit, really. Practicing acoustic guitar in front of the television set. I like to visit San Diego. My good friend Gregory Page lives there, and when I do go for a visit I take the train, which parallels the Pacific Ocean. Speed, bodies in the sun, bodies in the moonlight, California towns along the way, beach, the vast sea. Not all the time but some this is how I escape from the world and when I escape that’s when things happen. Many things in life can be solved. It all starts with observing.”

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It's not too late to fall in love with Sharaya J's Missy Elliott-directed 'Takin' It No More'/'Shut It Down' video

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Missy Elliott hasn’t released an album in nearly a decade. As a fan, that can be hard to deal with, especially as other rap and R&B stars of the early ’00s have mounted comebacks over the past few years. But as frustrating as the lack of a new Elliott LP has been, it’s hard to argue with the admittedly well-deserved semi-retirement she’s been enjoying, casually jumping on tracks for old friends, releasing the occasional hot new thing whenever the mood strikes her, and not really sweating career stuff.

Recently she’s taken on Jersey artist Sharaya J as a protege, performing with her at the afterparty for an Alexander Wang runway show and even making a video for her. Back at the end of September, Sharaya J released a diptych video for her songs “Takin’ It No More” and “Shut It Down,” which Elliott co-directed and executive produced. It’s Elliott’s first time directing, as she admitted last night on Twitter, but she’s obviously learned a lot from starring in videos, and the results of her debut effort are way more impressive than the average novice. It helps that Sharaya J is a superstar just waiting to happen, with intense vocal and dance skills matched by a charisma that blasts out of the screen with an almost palpable force.

She also seems to have inherited Elliott’s frenetically experimental streak—there aren’t many artists out there who have the skills or even the inclination to pull off choreography that incorporates real-time sign language translations into their dance moves.

The “Takin’ It No More”/”Shut It Down” video has been out for over a month now, and so far it’s only racked up a little over 100 thousand views, which is only a tiny fraction of what it deserves. A month may seem like a million years in today’s hyperkinetic pop landscape, but that doesn’t mean it’s too late to fall in love with it.

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The Paperhead shares what they've been listening to in the van

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The Paperhead is frequently grouped in with Nashville’s vigorous garage rock scene, but the band actually draws less from The Stones and The Seeds than it does from a period of the late ’60s and early ’70s where whimsical psychedelia and pastoral folk met up with rock’s push toward more sophisticated songwriting.

Their new Africa Avenue LP (out now on the buzzy Chicago label Trouble in Mind) is full of giddily tripped-out pop hooks and unexpected sharp turns that have made them one of the most talked-about rock bands of the moment. They just wrapped up their latest tour, and they’ve shared with EW a playlist of what they’ve been listening to in the van.

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Stream singer-songwriter Pisces' luminous new LP

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On much of her self-titled debut LP, singer-songwriter Sarah Negahdari–the front person for the band Happy Hollows who also records under the name Pisces–sounds something like an L.A.-ified reincarnation of Nick Drake, with the same delicate, dreamy take on folk music but sunny Laurel Canyon vibes taking the place of Drake’s very British gloom. The Pisces LP, featuring the hard-to-shake single “Being With You,” came out last week. You can stream it here or buy it on Bandcamp.

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