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Tag: Buzzworthy (21-30 of 616)

DMA's give the Britpop revival a boost with 'Laced'

DMAS

It’s been 19 years since Oasis released (What’s the Story) Morning Glory?, so it’s about time for Britpop to have another day in the sun.

There’s already been a marked increase recently in bands sonically referencing Britain’s crunchy but unabashedly poppy response to the relatively dour American alt-rock movement, and a few, like Newtown, Australia’s DMA’s, who seem to consider it a primary musical touchstone. The handful of home-recorded songs they’ve released so far have not just the slurry, ragged lead vocals of classic Oasis, but that band’s buoyant sense of melody as well.

Their latest, “Laced,” combines that with some of The Verve’s stoned ambience and Britpop godfathers XTC’s fizzy bubblegum edge. “Laced” and “So We Know” be released as a single in November, available digitally via Mermaid Avenue in the U.S.

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Ta-ku puts a dreamy spin on Young & Sick's 'Heartache Fetish'

YOUNG-AND-SICK

Young & Sick is the brainchild of Dutch artist Nick Van Hofwegen, a multimedia project that encompasses not only his visual art (which has graced the covers of records by Maroon 5, Robin Thicke, and Foster the People, among others) but also the music he produces under the same alias.

Back in the spring, he released a track called “Heartache Fetish” that doses ’90s bump-and-grind R&B with the same heady surrealism that infuses his artwork and has become one of his most popular songs.

Now he’s recruited Australian electronic artist Ta-ku, who previously turned Chet Faker’s “Talk Is Cheap” into a syrupy sonic puddle, for a remix that injects the song with bits of cloud rap and two-step and transforms it into a mellower but substantially stranger listening experience.

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Grab a free download of Boundary's chilled-out, bass-happy 'Rosemont'

When Ghislain Poirier first appeared on the dance music scene a few years ago, he made a splash with gleefully noisy, jarringly frenetic tracks built out of wailing synthesizers and choppy beats. His songs offered the best parts of dancehall, techno, club rap, and pretty much everything else that’s made to get people acting rowdy on a dance floor. At the time, this sort of genre agnosticism hadn’t yet become as firmly entrenched in dance music as it is now—which meant that fans scrambled to figure out what to even call Poirier’s music. New Yorker pop critic Sasha Frere-Jones came closest to nailing the music’s highly focused vibrancy when he coined the term “lazer bass.”

When he’s not lighting dance floors on fire, Poirier records stuff under the name Boundary that does pretty much the exact opposite. His new album Still Life is richly textured chill-out music that’s calming and conducive to meditative states—but still delivers enough bass to keep beat junkies happy. Each track is a skillfully uncluttered arrangement of meticulously well-designed tones, and each spin is like entering a perfectly manicured Zen garden of sound. For a sample of its habit-forming vibes, try this free download of Still Life‘s standout track “Rosemont.”

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Rap duo Moors go spacey and slow-motion with 'Smoke'

Moors

At the moment, the rap duo Moors is best known for being the musical project of actor Keith Stanfield, who appeared in last year’s critically acclaimed Short Term 12 and will play a young Snoop Dogg in the upcoming N.W.A. biopic Straight Outta Compton. But the spaced-out, slow-motion hip-hop that he makes with producer HH, which finds a rich groove somewhere in between Tricky-style trip-hop and Common-style bohemian rap, is easily strong enough to stand on its own.

Moors drop their self-titled debut EP (which features remixes by Postal Service member Dntel and avant-hip-hop producer Daedelus) on Oct. 28 on the Haven Sounds label, and the pair will spend most of November on the road. For now, enjoy an early look at the single “Smoke.”

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Hear stylish genre-blurrers Emprss' brand-new single, 'Down'

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Ralph Allan, Leo Crossing, and Johnny Goddard have been making music together since they were teenagers in sleepy Farnham, England. Now in their mid-20s, they’ve fallen in with a wave of young British artists who are blurring the lines between pop, dance music, and R&B to the point where a listener can have a hard time telling where one influence ends and the next begins. In the year or so since they started working on Emprss in earnest, they’ve released a handful of singles and EPs that have inspired a cult following on SoundCloud, and quite a few people wagering they could become the next The xx. Their debut album comes out sometime in the coming months, but in the meantime to mark the start of their UK tour with Hundred Waters they’re releasing a sleek and stylish teaser single called “Down” that should help tip the aura of anticipation surrounding them from “substantial” to “fully ridiculous.”

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Weaves have a hot new rock song with an NSFW title

Weaves has a slippery sonic identity that can change radically from song to song, turning on a dime from fuzzy electropop to a compellingly weird amalgamation of the B-52′s and UK postpunk to straightforward power pop. It might make for a confusing listen if the group didn’t have frontwoman Jasmyn Burke’s distinctive achey voice to pull it all together, as well as the chops to pull off seemingly whatever style they tackle.

On their latest single—whose title EW style prevents us from publishing in the headline, but which we can tell you here in the body of this post is actually “S–thole”—the Toronto four-piece sounds a little like The Pixies at their proto-grunge best covering a Burger Records stoner-pop song. The single comes out Oct. 20 through Buzz Records.

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Teen-pop veteran Tinashe grows up and out on 'Aquarius'

Tinashe

Aquarius, released this week, may be Tinashe’s first proper album, but she’s far from a rookie in the entertainment game. The 21-year-old singer got her start early as an actor, appearing in Robert Zemeckis’s CGI Christmas flick The Polar Express and the Bob Dylan-starring surrealist sci-fi project Masked and Anonymous before being recruited at age 14 to join a manufactured teen-pop group. That may not sound like a very auspicious start for a serious music career, but she says it was valuable nonetheless. “I think I learned a lot being in a situation where I wasn’t necessarily able to create music that was totally true to who I was or to present the person who I was,” she says over the phone from her home in Los Angeles.

If anything, her time in The Stunners helped give Tinashe a good idea of what she didn’t want to do when she struck out on her own. After the group split up in 2011 she started working on solo material in her home studio, sans record contract. “When you’re part a group,” she says, “it’s definitely a group effort, creatively. When I wasn’t signed to a record label I was free to make my own decisions. I definitely felt the need to create stuff on my own and just do things and make my own decisions and just put things out there. It was a really important step for me because it really opened the door so that now I have so much creative control in my art.”

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Synths and psychedelia collide on Canopies' 'The Plunderers and the Pillagers'

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Milwaukee electro-psych-pop quintet Canopies have a lot of synthesizers and a lot of patience. Despite the buzzworthiness of their sound, which should resonate with fans of MGMT, the group eschewed the urge to rush into releasing its first album and instead went two solid years with a pile of vintage equipment patiently assembling their debut, Maximize Your Faith (out Dec. 9 on Forged Artifacts).

The payoff to their slow-moving approach is apparent on the intricately layered instrumentation on “The Plunderers and the Pillagers,” which you can spend multiple listens peeling apart to find the nifty little flourishes woven into the mix. Or you could just sit back and enjoy the song’s expansive hooks and crackling energy, which make it an excellent choice for starting off your weekend with a synth-heavy bang.

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Brazilian psych-rockers Wannabe Jalva want to take you higher

Brazilian quartet Wannabe Jalva hail from southern Brazil, near the country’s borders with Argentina and Uruguay, and not coincidentally, their music largely forgoes the tropical flavor the country’s best known for in favor of a more sere sonic approach that seems to reflect their proximity to the Pampas. Their latest EP, Collecture (out Oct. 15), offers a compellingly austere take on psych rock that avoids the clichéd gaudiness that often afflicts the form, and brings to mind The Strokes as often as it does Os Mutantes or Pink Floyd. Run through with heavy, Jodorowsky-esque mysticism, the album’s a straight up trip.

“We’ve extracted moods and textures from ourselves and put them out there in an almost collective epiphany,” guitarist Tiago Abrahão emails from Brazil. “Nature comes from the fact that we realized that the right path (the essence) was to lock ourselves in there (in the basement) and just get out when we all felt fulfilled (and, at the same time, empty from those temporarily undefined urges).” Maybe a tough statement to wrap your head around, but once you put Collecture on, it makes more sense than you might expect.

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A$AP Rocky returns with 'Multiply'

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Pop in your grills and give a pitch-dropped “unh,” because A$AP Rocky’s back.

Thursday at midnight, the Harlem rapper released “Multiply,” his first new recording in the nearly two years since his debut album LONG.LIVE.A$AP. Although Juicy J gets a feature credit, the former Three 6 Mafia member’s role is limited to a spoken-word intro and outro, and providing the inspiration for a brief reference to “Stay Fly.” Flacko spends the rest of the track big-upping Houston rap legend Pimp C, sh– talking over trendy streetwear labels, and revealing his interest in going all New Jack City by making Jeeps a thing again—all over a beat by emerging producer Curtis Heron, which takes Rocky’s signature icy, slow motion psychedelia to trippy new levels. READ FULL STORY

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