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Tag: Comedy (1-10 of 10)

Real Estate bring out Nick Kroll, Andy Daly, skateboarding vampires for 'Crime' video: Watch it here

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If you’re a fan of Real Estate’s new album Atlas, extreme sports-loving vampires, old people, Thai restaurants, and/or mildly erotic ceramics, then the music video below is your Citizen Kane.

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'This Is A Trent Reznor Song' now has a Nine Inch Nails-biting video

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A few weeks ago, a dude named Frederick Scott tickled Nine Inch Nails fans with “This Is A Trent Reznor Song,” a loving tribute to the NIN frontman’s songwriting and performance tics. It was awesome, and one of the better musical parodies on the entirety of the Internet.

Now comes the next stage: Scott’s video for “This Is A Trent Reznor Song,” which borrows elements from the clips for Nine Inch Nails’ “Closer” and “The Hand That Feeds.” Once again Scott nails it, with the same kind of video effects from “The Hand That Feeds” and the commitment to spooky photography and weird lighting from the classic “Closer.”

It’s a little more outwardly funny than the song itself—the reaction shot Scott gives to the bottle of milk is particularly fantastic—but it still retains the same kind of reverence for Reznor’s work as the track.

Check out the video below. And while you’re at it, check out some of the clips from Nine Inch Nails’ Tension tour, one of the better live music experiences from last year.

 

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Bask in the brilliance of the Nine Inch Nails parody 'This Is A Trent Reznor Song'

If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, then Frederick Scott just paid Nine Inch Nails mastermind Trent Reznor the ultimate compliment.

Scott’s “This Is a Trent Reznor Song” is a spot-on homage to Reznor, who Scott described on Twitter as “one of my musical heroes.” In a track that ends up sounding an awful lot like Reznor’s Hesitation Marks single “Came Back Haunted,” Scott narrates the construction of a typical NIN tune, pointing out the esoteric percussion, weird noises, and the escalating nature of Reznor’s voice.

Anybody who has spent quality time with The Downward Spiral or The Fragile will understand. Listen below: READ FULL STORY

Best and Worst 2013: The 5 best stand-up albums of the year

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Stand-up albums should be a dead concept in 2013. With all the free comedy available via podcasts, the explosion of late night talk shows, and the ever-expanding embrace of singular voices on cable (most notably on Comedy Central and IFC), it seems like there would be way too much material out there for anybody to care about the execution of a well-made album.

Yet plenty of comedians put together records this year, and many of them were excellent. Louis C.K. has a lot to do with this—though he puts more emphasis on video than audio for his specials, he has made the idea of putting together a really killer hour cool again, and lots of comics followed suit.

The albums that make up the list below are all excellent, and they all deliver on presenting each comic’s worldview using wildly different approaches to the work. All but one have podcasts and all are TV regulars, but these albums represent their most surgically sharp work and honed jokes. They’re all worth checking out (as are albums by Moshe Kasher, Mike Lawrence, and Bill Cosby, all of whom just missed the cut), no matter what style of comedy you’re most into.

1. Kumail Nanjiani, Beta Male
Nanjiani is a fantastic regular on Portlandia and co-hosts a video game-based podcast called The Indoor Kids that kills. Both of those outlets have hinted at what Nanjiani was capable of, but Beta Male is his career peak so far. A transcendent raconteur, Nanjiani manages to spin strange, surreal tales from his childhood in Pakistan into charged blasts of whimsy (the long tale about a terrifying birthday party is excellent, and his deep dive into a harrowing experience with a VCR is even better). There’s also stuff that hits closer to home, like a segment centered around Call of Duty and a priceless bit about a cat who tries to deliver him pizza. Nanjiani signed a Comedy Central deal for a show that will debut next year, and if Beta Male is any indication, he’s the network’s next big thing.

2. Jimmy Pardo, Sprezzatura
Pardo is the uncrowned King of Podcasting. READ FULL STORY

Mumford & Sons get Jason Sudeikis, Jason Bateman and more to spoof them in 'Hopeless Wanderer' video -- WATCH

Mumford & Sons have got a sense of humor after all … is what you’re supposed to think after watching the video for “Hopeless Wanderer.”

The professional white funnymen Jason Sudeikis, Jason Bateman, Ed Helms and Wil Forte stand in for the band, wearing suspenders and fake beards, hauling their instruments down a dusty lane, playing in a row boat, crying, tasting each other’s tears, and eventually smashing their instruments and at least one of the filament bulbs lighting the barn they’re in.

Because you can’t make a parody these days without taking it over the top, Sudeikis and Forte also share an open-mouthed kiss.

I was more tickled by the smoke coming off Bateman’s hands during his banjo solo. Although the kiss seems less rote when you think of it as underlining the song’s vague references to a young man’s romantic confusion (key line: “I wrestled long with my youth,” snicker).

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Inaugural BottleRock brings Black Keys, Kings of Leon, and Anthony Jeselnik to Napa Valley

Music festivals continue to grow, and between now and the end of the summer, there is essentially a major one every single weekend. The expanded menu requires a lot more diversity, both in the types of acts booked on the main stages and the other attractions offered on the grounds. Gone are the days when you could just set up a PA and invite some dudes with guitars—now there have to be multiple hooks to convince people to make the journey to your field.

Enter BottleRock Napa Valley, a new festival that launches its inaugural entry this Wednesday, May 8, and runs through Sunday May 12. The music lineup is impressive, and will include sets from the Black Keys, Zac Brown Band, Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, Kings of Leon, Flaming Lips, Jane’s Addiction, Train, the Shins, Alamabama Shakes, and dozens more.

Perhaps BottleRock’s biggest secret weapon, though, is its comedy lineup: READ FULL STORY

Fall Out Boy pay tribute to Spinal Tap on 'Conan': Watch here!

Fall Out Boy just dropped their latest (and actually very good) album Save Rock and Roll, and though their song titles are not as pun-tacular as they used to be, the band clearly hasn’t lost its sense of humor.

On last night’s episode of Conan, the band busted out Save Rock and Roll‘s first single “My Songs Know What You Did In the Dark” with a little help from the famous “Rock and Roll Creation” pods from This Is Spinal Tap.

When one of the pods failed to open (as they are wont to do) and imprisoned bassist Pete Wentz, Tap’s own bassist Derek Smalls (a.k.a. actor and writer Harry Shearer) filled in on the low end.

He brought along some pals, too. Check out the entirety of Fall Out Boy’s performance on last night’s episode of Conan below: READ FULL STORY

Odd Future's 'Loiter Squad' returns to Adult Swim: Watch an EXCLUSIVE clip!

A few weeks ago, Odd Future centerpiece Tyler the Creator announced the release date of his new album Wolf and dropped the first single and video in “Domo 23.”

That clip looked a whole lot like a sequence from the collective’s manic sketch comedy project Loiter Squad, which also happens to be returning this Sunday, March 10, at Midnight on Adult Swim. Last season sat somewhere between The Kids in the Hall and Jackass, and based on the exclusive clip below, the second go-round will be a ratcheted-up version of the same.

Check out the soon-to-be-beloved new character “Catchphrase Jones” below.

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Best and Worst 2012: The five best stand-up albums of the year

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In the past, a stand-up comic basically had one career path: Build up some solid minutes on the club circuit, get yourself on late night TV, and hope that somebody with a check book comes calling with a sitcom deal or an HBO special. But while technology seems to be crushing a lot of other entertainment universes, it’s allowing more and more comedians to thrive thanks to podcasting, self-released albums, crowdsourced tours, easily-produced web series, and more opportunities for singular voices on risk-taking cable networks.

No matter where you like to get your yuks, it was a great year for comedy—and for pushing the envelope of what stand-up comedy could be. The albums below represent a small cross-section of the greatness that flowed from the minds of some of the most brilliant creators in entertainment today, and each one takes a wholly unique approach to the craft.

1) Tig Notaro, Live
Notaro’s Job-like narrative has been well documented, but Live (as in “Live Forever,” not Live At Red Rocks) works just as well even if you’re not intimately aware of Notaro’s health struggles. That’s how powerful and honest it is: Over the course of a half hour, she lays out her story with equal parts clinical pragmatism (her genuine insistence that the audience take probiotics whenever they are put on antibiotics) and “Can you believe this?” wonder. Notaro’s dry, deadpan style makes for quite a tightrope walk, as it’s always hard to tell whether or not she’s going to laugh or cry. The audience doesn’t know either, and that what makes Live a brilliant, thrilling listening experience. And despite all the doom and gloom, it’s also fantastically funny, like when a technician asks her what her secret to being skinny is, and she gives the gallows reply, “Oh, I’m dying.” It’s a testament to both the style and the substance of one of the best performances by anyone in any venue in 2012.  READ FULL STORY

Jimmy Fallon's 'Blow Your Pants Off': He tells EW about the stories -- and the stars -- behind the songs

Jimmy Fallon’s new album Blow Your Pants Off — a collection of weirdo experiments and famous-people duets from Fallon’s late-night talk show — drops today, and all the big hits are there, including “A History of Rap,” “Slow Jam the News,” and “Friday feat. Stephen Colbert.” (Sadly, his cover of Carly Rae Jepsen’s “Call Me Maybe” came too late to land on this album — thanks for filling in the blanks, Internet!)

EW got Fallon on the phone to talk about conjuring Tebowie, the debt he owes to Dr. Demento, and what it took to convince a Beatle to sing “Scrambled Eggs.”

Entertainment Weekly: First thing’s first: At what point did you realize you had a pretty good Neil Young impression?
Jimmy Fallon: I think I’ve done Neil Young since high school. My parents were into Neil Young, and I’d imitate him because he had such a distinct voice. But I never thought I could do anything funny with it. That’s where the writers come in. A writer said, “I know you do Neil Young, so what if you did Neil Young singing Fresh Prince of Bel-Air?” And I was like, “I don’t know.” So we just started goofing around with a guitar, and it just makes every song sound so beautiful. It’s kind of sad but poignant, and also kind of rock and roll at the same time. We did it to Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, we did it to Willow Smith’s “Whip My Hair.” We even made “Pants on the Ground” sound like a beautiful dirge — a mournful ballad. READ FULL STORY

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