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Tag: Covers (31-40 of 150)

TV Jukebox: 'Mad Men,' 'Supernatural,' 'Missing,' and more music-on-TV moments

Old-school tracks were the name of the game more often than not these past few weeks. Whether your definition of “old-school” translates to proper Mad Men-era tunes heard on the AMC hit, Scandal, and Supernatural, or ’80s classics as seen on Happy Endings and One Tree Hill, this week’s Jukebox offers up a retro rave fit for anybody. Of course there were plenty of contemporary jams, too: MCs from London and the Bronx on Breakout KingsCSI: NY, and 90210, TV darlings Sleigh Bells on The Vampire Diaries, and Portland indie rockers Novosti on Missing, plus “show tunes” from GCB and Gossip Girl. Check out our picks below. (Warning for those still catching up on DVR: SPOILERS ahead!)

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Simone Felice: The ex-Felice Brothers member on his new album, near-death experience, and Courtney Love

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In May of 2010, singer-songwriter Simon Felice should have been feeling on top of the world. His band The Duke & the King was preparing to release their second album Long Live the Duke & the King, the follow-up to 2009’s critically admired Nothing Gold Can Stay, And Felice’s wife was heavily pregnant with their first child, a double blessing given the couple had previously suffered a late-term miscarriage the previous year.

But Felice, who first gained a following playing alongside his siblings in folk-rock act The Felice Brothers, was not feeling on top of the world in the early summer of 2010. In fact, he was feeling like hell warmed over. “If you look at pictures of me, I was just pale and grey,” says the singer, 35, over the phone from his home “on a cliff” in upstate New York’s Catskill Mountains. “I didn’t have insurance, I never went to the doctor. I didn’t know it, but I was slowly dying.”

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What is the most '90s movie soundtrack of all time?

Last weekend, I stumbled across my new favorite blog on the Internet.

It’s written by a dude named Chris who is on an ongoing quest to decide which film released between 1990 and 1999 is the most ’90s movie of all time. He uses a handful of rotating criteria, like whether or not the plot of the film could be executed using today’s technology and social customs, the extreme ’90s-ness of the fashion, the use of outdated technology (like pagers and gigantic laptops), and whether the stars of the film are inextricably linked to the decade.

“The Quest” has been going on for a year, but I was so enamored of the idea that I ran through dozens of posts in a single afternoon, internally debating the merits of the scoring system and trying to decide whether or not Angelina Jolie is tethered to any particular era (and even if she isn’t, Hackers is still a paragon of ’90s-ness).

Top scoring entries so far include Don’t Tell Mom the Babysitter’s Dead (major points based on the impossibility of the plot in today’s technological landscape), Clueless (obvious nods to several different levels of fashion as well as the Mighty Mighty Bosstones), and Encino Man (a winner just based on the presence of Pauly Shore, perhaps the most ’90s a person has ever been).

That walk down memory lane appealed to me not only because I have so many personal memories tied up in movies like Happy Gilmore, Mallrats, and I Know What You Did Last Summer, but also because ’90s film soundtracks are about the only compact discs I still buy.

Whenever I’m in a used record store (especially in a city I’ve never visited), my first stop is always the soundtracks, where incredible relics like Twister and Batman Forever live in permanently unloved rotation. I’ve amassed a pretty thorough collection that acts as a remarkable summation of the times — especially the ones that were clearly curated to appeal to fans of the associated movies (and the ones that weren’t are even more mind-blowing).

So naturally, I started thinking: What ’90s movie soundtrack is the most ’90s? READ FULL STORY

Bruce Springsteen concert review: Dedicates 'American Skin' to Trayvon Martin, collapses into triumph

Bruce Springsteen played the first of two nights in Philadelphia on Wednesday. If the news headline is that he pointedly directed his audience to hear his 2000 song “American Skin (41 Bullets)” now as a parable for the fate of Trayvon Martin, the music story of this show is that Springsteen has broken through to a new level of interest in beats, rhythms, and ways to keep his old music fresh, for himself and for his fans. READ FULL STORY

Did Katy Perry just take a dig at Beyonce? You be the judge

Don’t expect Katy Perry to pay tribute to Beyonce anytime soon. Though the singer just performed a cover of Kanye and Jay Z’s “N—s in Paris,” when it comes to Jay’s better half, she’s apparently got some reservations.

The same day Perry performed her rendition of the track during a visit to BBC Radio 1, she purportedly made a dig at Beyonce and Shakira’s 2007 hit “Beautiful Liar.” Perry let her feelings about the song slip while discussing a possible collaboration with Rihanna. READ FULL STORY

Marilyn Manson and Johnny Depp finally release song together — and it's a Carly Simon cover

When Marilyn Manson recently released his new single “No Reflection,” we wondered whether he was still scary — or even relevant.

Likewise, one could ask a similar question about Johnny Depp: Is he still cool?

We’re not sure, but we do know that Captain Jack is teaming up with the “Beautiful People” singer to release a duet cover of Carly Simon’s “You’re So Vain,” which fans(?) will be able to hear on Manson’s upcoming album Born Villain.

If the project sounds like some oddball, Jack White-meets-ICP-style pairing, think again — Depp and Manson are actually real-life buddies who attend movie premieres together and stuff.

They’ve even been known to go to each other’s houses to compare their funky hat collections. OK, fine, we can’t say for sure that that’s actually true… but we also can’t say for sure that it’s not true.

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Katy Perry covers 'N---s In Paris': Watch it here!

Katy Perry’s collaborations with rappers so far have been pretty fruitful — the Snoop Dogg-assisted “California Gurls” and the Kanye West-abled “E.T.” both ended up in the top position on the Billboard Hot 100. Earlier today, she proved that she might have learned a thing or two from her collaborators.

While visiting BBC Radio 1, Perry put a New York Yankees hat on top of her electric-blue hair and ripped into a cover of “N—-s in Paris,” from West and Jay-Z’s Watch the Throne. It was slowed down slightly and re-arranged so that it could be played by her band, and nixed most of the bad words.

The energy level is way lower than the original, though Perry seemed really focused on getting all the lyrics out (and it’s a lot of lyrics).”This is about to get embarrassing,” she said before ripping into the first verse. You can be the judge of that below. READ FULL STORY

Sleigh Bells does Beyonce's 'Irreplaceable' justice: Hear it here

Hey, remember that time we were all wondering what it would sound like if R&B diva Beyoncé collaborated with indie-thrash duo Sleigh Bells?

Sadly, we never found out, but the next best thing has turned up. Sleigh Bells — who’ve recently released their heavy new record Reign of Terror and performed on Saturday Night Live — visited BBC Radio 1’s Zane Lowe to play a couple of songs, including a cover of Beyoncé’s to-the-left classic “Irreplaceable.” And it’s really good!

Typically, the band’s singer and headbanger-in-chief Alexis Krauss uses her enchanting pipes to yell demonic phrases like “burn the orphanage” and “when the birds start bleeding.” But Krauss also has a teen-pop background thanks to her Rubyblue days, so it’s actually not that surprising that she can find her away around a Top 40 single so well.

Check out the track below and let us know if you agree:

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Whitney Houston covered by Chris Cornell, Robin Thicke, Aretha Franklin, and more: Watch the videos here

Over the weekend, Whitney Houston was laid to rest in a ceremony that featured testimonials from friends and family as well as performances from Alicia Keys, R. Kelly, Stevie Wonder, and a host of other stars who either worked with Houston or were deeply influenced by her work.

The tributes didn’t end there, as a number of artists continued to tip their hats to Houston in concert and elsewhere. Shortly after his arrest in New York City for possession of marijuana, Robin Thicke dropped his cover of Houston’s 1995 hit “Exhale (Shoop Shoop).” As recorded by Houston, the track was a fully realized Babyface production, but Thicke breaks it down to little more than a piano lilt, a bit of an organ hum, and his breathy coo. It’s a lovely rendition of one of the best slow-rolling R&B jams of the ’90s.

On the surface, it would seem that Thicke’s tribute to Houston would make much more sense than Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell’s, but consider the grunge icon’s pedigree: Not only does he own a gigantic set of pipes himself, but he also cut an R&B album (granted, one that everybody seems to forget about).

During a fund-raiser for Barack Obama on Friday night, Cornell spun out an acoustic rendition of Houston’s signature hit “I Will Always Love You.” It wasn’t quite as moving as Jennifer Hudson’s take on the song at the Grammys, but it was still well-executed. Watch it below. READ FULL STORY

Fred Durst did it all for the karaoke: Watch him perform his own song 'Nookie' at a bar

Did you know that Limp Bizkit put out their big comeback album in 2011? It’s true! It was called Gold Cobra and had a single called “Shotgun” that EW wasn’t particularly fond of.

The band hadn’t released an album in six years, and it was supposed to be the triumphant return for a group who, for better or for worse, set the tone for mainstream rock at the turn of the century.

Gold Cobra didn’t return Limp Bizkit to the days of red hats and arson, and if you need an apt metaphor for its failure, you need look no further than frontman Fred Durst’s visit to Rock & Reilly’s in Los Angeles on Monday night, where he got on the microphone and did a beatbox-assisted karaoke version of “Nookie,” his band’s signature hit from 1999’s Significant Other. Take a look below. READ FULL STORY

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