The Music Mix Music news, reviews, albums, concerts, and downloads

Tag: Dance music (1-10 of 19)

Sara Jackson-Holman releases a spooky Natasha Kmeto remix of 'Haunt Me'

In its original form, which you can hear on her River Queen EP, Sara Jackson-Holman’s “Haunt Me” is an airy piano ballad that shows off her knack for catchy melodies and interesting, unfussy arrangements, and is considerably cheerier than its title suggests.

In the hands of fellow Portlander Natasha Kmeto, whose dark but danceable electronic compositions might seem a world away from Jackson-Holman (but are actually strangely complementary), it becomes something much more, well, haunting. It should come in handy when you make your playlist of songs to get spookily down to this weekend.

READ FULL STORY

Sex, paranoia, techno collide on Art Department and Seth Troxler's 'Cruel Intentions'

Detroit may be techno’s birthplace, but nearly from the start it’s also had a sphere of direct influence that extends far enough to encompass places like Toronto and Kalamazoo, Michigan. Those are the hometowns, respectively, of the group Art Department (comprised of producers Kenny Glasgow and Jonny White) and Seth Troxler, techno scene stalwarts who balance a deep respect for the genre’s conventions with a sonic daringness that keeps their work from falling into the trap of rote reproduction.

Recently all three teamed up for a track called “Cruel Intentions” that coats techno’s relentless minimalist thump in a thick layer of organic grime that evokes greasy, beat-up machinery and tops it with an intriguingly enervated-sounding vocal part that sounds like it could have been recorded from a death bed. The video (produced with a grant from the Canadian talent-promotion foundation MuchFACT) adds in a bit of creepy surveillance-state paranoia and abstract sexiness to the cocktail of intriguingly weird vibes.

READ FULL STORY

Stream Chance the Rapper tourmate Sweater Beats's fizzy 'Cloud City' EP

Sweater-Beats

In the two years since his single “MLLN DLLR” put him on the map Brooklyn beat maker Antonio Cuna, a.k.a. Sweater Beats, has accumulated an enviable list of co-signs from important figures in EDM and hip-hop, the two genres that he blends in his music to giddy, effervescent effect. He’s been big-upped by Diplo, performed for Boiler Room, and toured with Chet Faker, Flume, and Chicago star-in-the-making Chance the Rapper, who he’s on the road with right now.

Next Tuesday, Oct. 28, the Huh What & Where label will release a free-to-download EP entitled Cloud City that whips together club rap, trap music, a little electropop, and a touch of ambient atmosphere into four frothy tracks that bang hard but stay airy and light. Until then, you can stream it here.

READ FULL STORY

Museum of Love combines synthesizers, sculpture, and sadness on 'The Who's Who of Who Cares'

Like their DFA label mates, Museum of Love‘s Pat Mahoney and Dennis McNany make music that seems to come from an alternate universe where guitar-based rock ‘n’ roll died out in the late ’70s and was replaced by electronic musicians with analog gear and more delicately nuanced sensibilities who in the timeline we inhabit have been relegated to cult status. The first single from their brand new self-titled debut LP, the funky but vaguely bummed-out “The Who’s Who of Who Cares,” offers interlocking synthesizer patterns, an archly theatrical vocal melody, and plenty of horn and percussion embellishments.

Together, the combination sounds like a collaboration between Roxy Music, Arthur Russell, and the Salsoul Orchestra that was handed off to a Chicago house producer for remixing. For the video, Mahoney shows off the sculpting skills he developed in his pre-music career working for the toy industry to create a reproduction of McNany’s head which the then promptly destroys.

READ FULL STORY

Grab a free download of Boundary's chilled-out, bass-happy 'Rosemont'

When Ghislain Poirier first appeared on the dance music scene a few years ago, he made a splash with gleefully noisy, jarringly frenetic tracks built out of wailing synthesizers and choppy beats. His songs offered the best parts of dancehall, techno, club rap, and pretty much everything else that’s made to get people acting rowdy on a dance floor. At the time, this sort of genre agnosticism hadn’t yet become as firmly entrenched in dance music as it is now—which meant that fans scrambled to figure out what to even call Poirier’s music. New Yorker pop critic Sasha Frere-Jones came closest to nailing the music’s highly focused vibrancy when he coined the term “lazer bass.”

When he’s not lighting dance floors on fire, Poirier records stuff under the name Boundary that does pretty much the exact opposite. His new album Still Life is richly textured chill-out music that’s calming and conducive to meditative states—but still delivers enough bass to keep beat junkies happy. Each track is a skillfully uncluttered arrangement of meticulously well-designed tones, and each spin is like entering a perfectly manicured Zen garden of sound. For a sample of its habit-forming vibes, try this free download of Still Life‘s standout track “Rosemont.”

READ FULL STORY

Bjork marks collaborator Mark Bell's death by posting his 'Possibly Maybe' remix

On Monday, EW reported that British electronic musician Mark Bell, a former member of the acclaimed British dance-music duo LFO and producer of seven Björk albums, died last week of complications from surgery. Bell wasn’t widely known outside dance music aficionados, but his work has echoed through pop music since he started working with Björk, beginning with her 1997 LP Homogenic, which borrowed ideas from drum ‘n’ bass, trip-hop, house, IDM, and other cutting-edge electronic styles of the time and wove them into an entirely new sound unto itself, a vigorous mutant hybrid that was both thoroughly pop-friendly and unabashedly avant-garde.

The influence of his work has only grown over the years, and has become especially noticeable in recent recordings by FKA TwigsBanks, and a legion of young artists looking to replicate Bell and Björk’s peculiar sonic alchemy.

In an apparent tribute to Bell, Björk’s posted to her SoundCloud his “Lucy remix” of “Possibly Maybe” from her album Post. Originally released in 1996 as one of several B-side remixes of the single, its boasts a syrupy beat, pitch-warped vocals, and a coating of amelodic tones that, nearly 20 years later, still sound ahead of their time.

READ FULL STORY

IHEARTCOMIX announce new singles label and all-star tour

chela

LA-based collective IHEARTCOMIX dabble in a little bit of everything youth culture-related, but they’re best known for putting out records and throwing parties. Their label, previously home to dance-party-friendly acts like Matt & Kim and Juiceboxxx, has been defunct since 2009, but they’re getting back to it with a new singles-focused label called IHC 1NFINITY. They’re describing it as “IHC’s attempt to create their own Marvel Cinematic Universe”founder Franki Chan remains a devoted comics geekand on top of sharing the clubby countercultural vibe that defines IHC’s identity, the releases will be loosely tied together through visual elements like cover art and videos.

IHC 1NFINITY will kick off with a promising trio of artists. They’ll start by making a new track called “Handful of Gold” by rising Australian-born alt-pop singer Chela, available for streaming on Oct. 21 and for purchase on Nov. 11. It’ll be followed by new releases from rapper Antwon–whose affinity for smashing together surreal imagery and emotional realness has made him the object of cultish adoration–in November and DIY dance music hero Pictureplane in January. All releases will also have remix packages available.

READ FULL STORY

Listen to Leo Justi's menacing new dance track, 'Devils Horns'

Leo-Justi

Rio-based electronic producer Leo Justi is far from a household name, but his star is most assuredly on the rise. He’s a leading figure in a Rio-based style called “heavy baile” that builds off the foundation of Brazilian baile funk–aka funk carioca, aka favela funk, aka the stuff M.I.A. emulated on “Bucky Done Gun”–but manages to incorporate everything from drum ‘n’ bass to heavy metal. It could be the next regional style to blow up on the global EDM scene, with A-Trak a fan and M.I.A. flying Justi out to India to record.

The title of Justi’s latest track, “Devils Horns,” from his HVY BL NSS PRR EP for the Waxploitation label, may be a nod to heavy baile’s heavier influences, or it could refer to the menacing brass stabs scattered throughout the track, or maybe both. Either way, the song’s got intensity to spare–it sounds like just the type of thing to turn a dance party into a full-blown riot.

READ FULL STORY

Watch The Juan Maclean's paint-streaked video for 'A Simple Design'

John Maclean got his start playing with the legendary (for the chaos they caused as much as the music they made) electropunk band Six Finger Satellite, but since the early aughts he’s been producing synth music under the name The Juan Maclean that incorporates abstract modern composition techniques alongside the heavy influence of early house and techno, resulting in recordings that are as good for producing a meditative mood as they are for dancing along to. Along the way he found a highly complementary partner in LCD Soundsytem vocalist Nancy Whang, who adds a human element to Maclean’s electronic compositions.

The pair just released In a Dream, their third LP together, on DFA Records that boasts a lead single, “A Simple Design,” that could be the catchiest thing they’ve ever made. The accompanying clip, directed by the Wilderness collective, gives the song an organic abstract paint job that’s as lush and satisfying as the song itself.

READ FULL STORY

Kid Sister is back with a new sound, a new philosophy, and a new alter ego

Kid-Sister.jpg

When Melisa Young, aka Kid Sister, released her breakthrough single “Pro Nails” back in 2007, hip-hop, pop, and dance music all still existed pretty much in their own lanes, and blending them together the way she did was still a largely unexplored idea. The song obviously didn’t take itself too seriously— it’s about getting your nails did, obviously — but it was revolutionary in its own low-key way, and after Kanye jumped on a remix, it became a smash hit in the club scene where a new generation of rappers and dance DJs were just starting to mingle.

“Pro Nails” led to Young being signed to Downtown Records, but despite the backing of a big label, production work by future EDM superstars like A-Trak, Rusko, Steve Angello, and Sebastian Ingrosso, and a plethora of hooks, her 2009 debut album Ultraviolet failed to live up to its high expectations. As the hybrid style she’d developed spread from the underground to the Hot 100, Young herself faded from the public eye.

At the end of August, nearly five years after Ultraviolet dropped, Young released  DUSK2DAWN- The Diary of Jane Jupiter, a mixtape that finds her going harder than she’s ever gone before, with a new sound with a noisier edge and a newfound interest in writing on topics far deeper than manicures. EW got her on the phone to talk about the transition.

READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Music

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP