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Tag: Dance music (1-10 of 25)

The Ting Tings' 'Wrong Club' gets an ironically club-worthy remix by Boix

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For their upcoming third LP Super Critical, British dance-pop duo The Ting Tings kept up their tradition of recording each of their albums in a different country and decamped to the island of Ibiza, the world’s unofficial capital of raving. “We were quite fascinated with how DJ’s construct their songs,” jet-lagged front woman Katie White explains by phone from her hotel room in Tokyo. “It’s quite different from how you’d write a typical pop song.”

“So we set off to Ibiza thinking we’d probably gonna be inspired by DJ culture and EDM and all of that,” she explains, “and we actually ended up making an album that sounded nothing like Ibiza. We’d go to the clubs, and they were really good, but we’d walk away and go, ‘Oh, could you imagine what it would be like to be in New York at CBGB and Studio 54 in the ’70s?’ We’d fantasize about all of these clubs that don’t exist. So we started to really look into it, and at the music that was played at those clubs.”

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Hear Odesza's brand-new remix of Grammy nominee Sia's 'Big Girls Cry'

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Singer, songwriter, and (as of Friday morning) three-time Grammy nominee Sia has two primary musical modes she tends to stick to: cathartic dance pop like her breakout single “Chandelier” and brooding power ballads like “Pretty Hurts” (which she wrote with Beyoncé). The album version of “Big Girls Cry,” from her 1000 Forms of Fear, is firmly of the second sort, but for a new official remix the rising EDM production duo ODESZA strips away the song’s angst and replaces it with the low-key but rave-able energy that they’ve made their trademark.

EW has an exclusive first listen.

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Robin Schulz shares a playlist that's heavy on the Robin Schulz

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German producer Robin Schulz got a big boost recently when his bongo-driven remix of Mr. Probz’s slow jam “Waves” went massively viral, reaching as high as No. 22 on the Billboard Hot 100. But Schulz is about more than simply combining deep house and soul. To celebrate his latest success, a remix of French folk-pop duo Lily & the Prick’s “Prayer in C” (which is doing “Waves”-like numbers on YouTube and Spotify), Schulz gave EW a playlist that goes heavy on his own remixes but also includes some unexpected selections like Chet Faker and SOHN.

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Terrace premieres 'Cote d'Azur' video

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Vancouver trio Terrace grew up in the heyday of dance music and synth disco—an era they revisit in their dreamy, danceable sound while somehow retaining a quality of timelessness. Terrace’s brand-new video for their August single, the characteristically infectious “Côte D’Azur,” embodies the band’s je ne sais quoi: It’s a sun-washed vision of the French Riviera circa the ’80s.

“As a child of the 80s, ‘Côte D’Azur’ is a tale of summer love and longing for the ultimate fantasy of life in the French Riviera,” explains frontman Simon Lock. (Fun fact: his other job is as a commercial airline pilot.) “A time and place where the sounds of Chic, Roxy Music, and Giorgio Moroder provided the soundtrack of carefree decadence,” he adds.

Especially present is the influence of Italian producer Giorgio Moroder, an early pioneer of synth disco and EDM, and Nile Rodgers, who has produced albums for David Bowie, Madonna, and Duran Duran. The imagery in the video, directed by Barcelona-based Marc Alcover, is sublime; the footage of crashing waves complements the song’s hypnotic hook, while the handheld shots of the young woman the video follows enhance the allure.

Below, watch the exclusive premiere of the video—and delight in the fact that”Côte D’Azur” is only the first in a planned trilogy of music videos from Terrace’s sophomore album, We Fall Together, dropping early next year.

German house masters Booka Shade made us a playlist

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House music’s been having a bit of a moment lately, thanks in part to the success of revivalist acts like Disclosure. But Berlin duo Booka Shade has been making house since well before those guys first got their hands on a copy of “On and On.”

In anticipation of their upcoming single “Line of Fire,” one half of the group, Arno Kammermeier, made us a playlist with an unexpected amount of rock ‘n’ roll on it.

Booka Shade plays the Brooklyn Electronic Music Festival tonight.

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Ryan Hemsworth talks about his new direction on 'Alone for the First Time'

Ryan Hemsworth has spent the past several years doing exactly what a young producer working on the increasingly blurry border between dance music and hip-hop should do to advance his career: playing for an adoring underground fan base while also booking bigger and bigger EDM festivals and assembling a portfolio of high-profile remixes for clients like Cat Power and Frank Ocean.

According to the producer playbook, his next move should have been to cash in all the professional capital he’s accumulated to pack an album of expansive, dance-friendly pop and rap with enough guest stars to attract attention from mainstream listeners. Instead, next week he’ll release Alone for the First Time, a collection of subdued pop songs with a decidedly organic feel, created alongside cult artists like Dawn Golden and The GTW who many listeners have probably never heard of. It’s a decision he’s extremely happy with.

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Sara Jackson-Holman releases a spooky Natasha Kmeto remix of 'Haunt Me'

In its original form, which you can hear on her River Queen EP, Sara Jackson-Holman’s “Haunt Me” is an airy piano ballad that shows off her knack for catchy melodies and interesting, unfussy arrangements, and is considerably cheerier than its title suggests.

In the hands of fellow Portlander Natasha Kmeto, whose dark but danceable electronic compositions might seem a world away from Jackson-Holman (but are actually strangely complementary), it becomes something much more, well, haunting. It should come in handy when you make your playlist of songs to get spookily down to this weekend.

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Sex, paranoia, techno collide on Art Department and Seth Troxler's 'Cruel Intentions'

Detroit may be techno’s birthplace, but nearly from the start it’s also had a sphere of direct influence that extends far enough to encompass places like Toronto and Kalamazoo, Michigan. Those are the hometowns, respectively, of the group Art Department (comprised of producers Kenny Glasgow and Jonny White) and Seth Troxler, techno scene stalwarts who balance a deep respect for the genre’s conventions with a sonic daringness that keeps their work from falling into the trap of rote reproduction.

Recently all three teamed up for a track called “Cruel Intentions” that coats techno’s relentless minimalist thump in a thick layer of organic grime that evokes greasy, beat-up machinery and tops it with an intriguingly enervated-sounding vocal part that sounds like it could have been recorded from a death bed. The video (produced with a grant from the Canadian talent-promotion foundation MuchFACT) adds in a bit of creepy surveillance-state paranoia and abstract sexiness to the cocktail of intriguingly weird vibes.

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Stream Chance the Rapper tourmate Sweater Beats's fizzy 'Cloud City' EP

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In the two years since his single “MLLN DLLR” put him on the map Brooklyn beat maker Antonio Cuna, a.k.a. Sweater Beats, has accumulated an enviable list of co-signs from important figures in EDM and hip-hop, the two genres that he blends in his music to giddy, effervescent effect. He’s been big-upped by Diplo, performed for Boiler Room, and toured with Chet Faker, Flume, and Chicago star-in-the-making Chance the Rapper, who he’s on the road with right now.

Next Tuesday, Oct. 28, the Huh What & Where label will release a free-to-download EP entitled Cloud City that whips together club rap, trap music, a little electropop, and a touch of ambient atmosphere into four frothy tracks that bang hard but stay airy and light. Until then, you can stream it here.

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Museum of Love combines synthesizers, sculpture, and sadness on 'The Who's Who of Who Cares'

Like their DFA label mates, Museum of Love‘s Pat Mahoney and Dennis McNany make music that seems to come from an alternate universe where guitar-based rock ‘n’ roll died out in the late ’70s and was replaced by electronic musicians with analog gear and more delicately nuanced sensibilities who in the timeline we inhabit have been relegated to cult status. The first single from their brand new self-titled debut LP, the funky but vaguely bummed-out “The Who’s Who of Who Cares,” offers interlocking synthesizer patterns, an archly theatrical vocal melody, and plenty of horn and percussion embellishments.

Together, the combination sounds like a collaboration between Roxy Music, Arthur Russell, and the Salsoul Orchestra that was handed off to a Chicago house producer for remixing. For the video, Mahoney shows off the sculpting skills he developed in his pre-music career working for the toy industry to create a reproduction of McNany’s head which the then promptly destroys.

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