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Tag: Diddy (1-10 of 16)

Puff Daddy returns with 'Big Homie': Hear it here!

Hot off the heels of re-christening himself Puff Daddy, the man born Sean Combs (also known as Diddy, P. Diddy, Puffy, Shiny Suit Man, One of Dave Chappelle’s Best Impressions, and that guy who is always on top of the Forbes Richest Musicians List despite not making very much music) has a new single called “Big Homie.” It was supposed to drop on Monday, but the streets couldn’t wait, as they say.

“Big Homie” features French Montana and Rick Ross, and the latter is clearly the biggest influence on Puff’s current sound: It’s big, it’s badass-sounding, and it leans into that signature monster plod. But while Ross’ penchant for rapping just behind the beat always sounds like a conscious decision (not even the power of rhythm can move the Bawse), Puff just sounds slightly inept (which is a pretty accurate description of his career-long rhyme style). Everybody is going hard, but by surrounding himself with high-impact blasters in Montana and Ross, Puff highlights the oomph his rapping has always lacked.

Still, “Big Homie” is a reasonable enough return to form for Puff Daddy that it should spark plenty of curiosity for his upcoming album MMM. And props to him for that line “The only one that’s topping Forbes/I’m getting lonely.” Listen to “Big Homie” below.

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P. Diddy is Puff Daddy again -- VIDEO

Just when we were finally getting used to calling Sean Combs “P. Diddy,” he goes and changes his name again. Typical.

Okay, so Combs has actually been known as P. Diddy, or occasionally just Diddy, since 2001, when he decided to shed Puff Daddy to make a statement about turning over a new leaf. (At the time, he was going through a weapons trial – a convenient opportunity to say “Ignore my past!”)

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On the Scene: Diddy's Revolt TV goes live at Hollywood studio

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The day after the Grammys is big for any music fan, so it makes perfect sense that Monday would be the first day for Sean “Diddy” Combs’ new digital cable music channel, Revolt TV, to go live with its first show, aptly titled Revolt Live.

From the channel’s new Hollywood studio, you can see the Hollywood sign perfectly framed in the background. And the setting is fitting – Revolt Live aims to be the music lover’s version of Sportscenter, giving fans the latest music news of the day as it happens; the show also features in-studio performances and interviews. For the first show, rappers Wiz Khalifa and Mack Wilds both made an appearance in the studio while Bastille, fresh off their SNL performance this past weekend, and Knicks player J.R. Smith were interviewed live from New York.
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CMA Awards: Best and Worst of the Broadcast

The real winners were announced Wednesday night at the 47th Annual Country Music Association Awards. But here are a few more honors from the telecast you should feel free to weigh in on:

Best “Suck it, haters” Taylor Swift moment ever: So not only did George Strait, Keith Urban, Tim McGraw, Faith Hill, Brad Paisley, and Rascal Flatts — all people for whom Swift opened at the start of her career — come out onstage to present the 23-year-old with the Pinnacle Award, there was also a video including kind messages from Mick Jagger, Justin Timberlake, Carly Simon, Julia Roberts, and Ethel Kennedy, among others. Watch it below. It’s might have been the best acceptance speech of Swift’s career, as she paid respect to each of the artists onstage with her.  READ FULL STORY

Maybach Music Group and the return of the compilation album

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It’s been a nondescript, if not painful (G-Unit still has me begging for mercy), decade for the hip-hop compilation album, but it looks like Rick Ross and his Maybach Music Group have brought an end to the drought. Self Made Vol. 2, MMG’s critically acclaimed sophomore work, hit stores earlier this week, and all signs point to another conquest for Ross in his ever-so-noble pursuit of eternal wealth.

If you ask Ross about the recent praise, he’ll tell you that the album’s — and by that same token, the group’s — success is rooted in MMG’s organic feel. Now this is no shot at The Boss, but a listening of Self Made 2‘s brighter moments inspires no such feelings of purity.

Take “Power Circle,” MMG’s nine-and-a-half-minute manifesto and one of the album’s best tracks. Ross kicks things off with a head-scratching toast to the King of Pop, offers up an interesting cocaine math lesson, wraps it up with his trademark grunt, and steps out of the spotlight at the one-minute mark. (Well, we do see him walking around shirtless, but that’s beside the point.)

The next eight minutes are devoted to MMG’s young guns taking turns punishing the microphone with verbal blows in a battle royale for center stage. There’s not a catchy hook nor a consistent theme to be found. Rather, the track is carried by the lyrical talents and individual qualities of the artists: Meek Mill’s aggressive Philly flow, Wale’s crazy good rhymes, even Ross’s absurd proclamations. READ FULL STORY

Diddy talks about Whitney Houston: 'She was full of life...full of joy' -- VIDEO

In the days since the passing of Whitney Houston, her friends and colleagues have opened up and shared about their time with the pop superstar.

During his visit to The Ellen DeGeneres Show, Diddy recalled his memories of Houston (who will be laid to rest on Saturday) and how he wound up as a guest at her 1992 wedding to Bobby Brown.

“When I was growing up in the music industry, before I had success, I somehow got on her wedding invitation,” Diddy told DeGeneres, “So I was at her wedding but I didn’t really know her — but it was one of the hottest things in town for the music industry.”
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Tupac shooter cops to an old crime, but what does it mean for Tupac and Biggie's murder cases?

Had he not been cut down in his prime by a (presumably) still-at-large assassin in 1996, rapper/actor/activist/poet/cultural lightning rod Tupac Shakur would have turned 40 years old today.

But on a day when we would normally be discussing his legacy—or what his creative place in today’s hip-hop world might have been had he lived—the attention has now turned instead to a man named Dexter Isaac, who gave an interview to AllHipHop wherein he admitted to being the man who shot Shakur in a famous unsolved incident outside a New York recording studio back in November of 1994.

Isaac claims he was paid $2,500 by James “Jimmy Henchman” Rosemond to take out Shakur. The New York Police Department is currently investigating the issue, and if they find the claims to be credible, they plan to speak with Isaac, who according to AllHipHop is currently serving a life sentence in prison. Will the information that Isaac has—or claims to have—have any bearing ultimately on the notoriously still-unsolved cases of both Tupac’s and Biggie’s murders? READ FULL STORY

Puff Daddy and his old family steal Diddy-Dirty Money's Coming Home New York City show

He may not be the best rapper in the game, but boy, Diddy can throw a party.

Last Friday (April 22) he and his Dirty Money crew‘s Coming Home Tour stopped at New York City’s Hammerstein Ballroom. It was literally a homecoming for Diddy, a Harlem native.

So instead of the refined and rehearsed offering several other cities likely received during the tour’s run, Diddy gave his hometown more, pulling several guests on stage and making it less of a Diddy-Dirty Money show and more of a nostalgic review of his Bad Boy Records heyday.

Diddy, along with DM singers Dawn Richard and Kalenna Harper, performed a few cuts from their Last Train to Paris early on. Diddy emerged dipped in white from head to toe and the trio performed “Ass on the Floor,” “Yeah, Yeah You Would,” “Yesterday,” and even an emotional medley of Sade’s classics, including “No Ordinary Love.”

Surprisingly, Diddy seemed a bit nervous up there at the start—as if uncertain of his Dirty Money material. To his credit, Train is an experimental hip-hop album we loved. Although as far as sales are concerned, it’s not a fan favorite (released last December, it hasn’t gone gold yet). And the audience’s halfhearted responses to their solid opening half hour proved as much.

But as he slid into the next portion of his set and the girls left, so did his nerves. After a roll call of the city’s boroughs, Diddy stopped to introduce Queens icon and A Tribe Called Quest rhymer Q-Tip, who brought the crowd to life with “Check the Rhime” and his solo banger “Vivrant Thing.”

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'American Idol': Diddy-Dirty Money and Skylar Grey perform 'Coming Home.' Your thoughts?

The American Idol results show performance machine has been relaunched for season 10: Diddy-Dirty Money and Skylar Grey kicked it off by singing their thoughtful, haunting hit “Coming Home” last night. I’m a huge fan of this song and thought it was a great way to get back into these results-show performances, which sometimes can be rather lackluster. Loved seeing Skylar at the piano. (Does anyone get Posh Spice vibes from her?) Loved the vintage photos behind Diddy on stage. Loved figuring out (finally!) who Dirty Money is.

Watch the clip after the jump and tell me: What’d you think?

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Skylar Grey talks penning 'I Need a Doctor,' her name change, and why her upcoming album may have a sound we've never heard before

Skylar-Grey_320.jpg Image Credit: Greg LaurenEven though we didn’t actually get a good look at Skylar Grey on the Grammys stage as she performed “I Need a Doctor” with Eminem and Dr. Dre, it was still a coming out party for the Wisconsin native who had 80 kids in her high school graduating class and turns 25 Wednesday.

Grey, who was also nominated for two Grammys for penning the Rihanna-sung chorus to Eminem’s “Love the Way You Lie,” tells EW her team has since been bombarded with emails from people wanting to work together, but she declines to name names, because you never know which collaborations will actually happen. (For her Twitter followers who know Nikki Sixx reached out via tweet about writing a song together, she says he has spoken to her manager but nothing has been set up yet.)

Keeping her in the shadows during the Grammys performance—something new fan Shirley Manson questioned—was intentional, Grey says. “My whole roll-out as Skylar Grey has been this mysterious being,” says the artist formerly known as Holly Brook. (She released the 2006 album Like Blood Like Honey and the 2010 EP O’Dark Thirty under that moniker, her first and middle names.) “If you’ve seen the website, even the pictures are very shadowed because we’re slowly easing me out. I’m not a big fan of trying to be a sex symbol or any of that stuff because I really like the music to speak for itself. And so I wanted to make that clear from the very beginning.”  READ FULL STORY

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