The Music Mix Music news, reviews, albums, concerts, and downloads

Tag: Drake (31-40 of 116)

Lil Wayne's 'I Am Not a Human II' tracklist revealed: Drake, Nicki Minaj, 2 Chainz to guest

lil-wayne

Now that we’ve seen the DONDA-designed album art for Lil Wayne’s upcoming I Am Not a Human II, it’s time to check out the tracklist.

The official Young Money site has posted the album’s 15-song list, and, unsurprisingly, there are lots of guests on the record (due out March 26).

Among the non-Weezy names are old pals like Drake, Nicki Minaj, 2 Chainz, and, of course, Big Sean on “My Homies Still.” But there are also some lesser-known up-and-comers, including YMCMB’s Gudda Gudda, Detail, and Boo (formerly of the rap duo Boo & Gotti).

And those aren’t the only guests, either. Check out the full I Am Not a Human II tracklist below:

READ FULL STORY

Kendrick Lamar drops Drake-featuring 'Poetic Justice' video: Watch it here

Kendrick-Lamar_510x317.jpg

A few weeks ago, Kendrick Lamar wowed SNL audiences with his run through “Poetic Justice,” one of the standout tracks from his fantastic good kid, m.A.A.d. city. The song samples Janet Jackson’s “Any Time, Any Place” and also features a guest spot from Drake. Trifecta!

Earlier today, Lamar debuted the video for “Poetic Justice,” which is by far his most ambitious video both narratively and visually. Kendrick predictably macks on a lady until tragedy strikes; in the meantime, Drake raps into a cordless phone in a hotel room while a woman lies unconscious next to him.

Watch it below:

READ FULL STORY

'Harlem Shake' hits number one, ushers in new world of YouTube-fueled charts

After a five-week run with the number one song in the country, Macklemore & Ryan Lewis’ “Thrift Shop” has finally abdicated its throne — thanks partly to a whole new chart formula.

As of this week, Billboard‘s Hot 100 now includes YouTube streams in its chart calculations, which means the king of the hill this week is Baauer’s nonstop meme instigator “Harlem Shake.”

Previously, the Hot 100 had used radio airplay, sales, and various forms of streaming through services like Spotify and Rhapsody to tabulate what the biggest song in the country was. Including YouTube numbers makes perfect sense, since in a way the online video service is the biggest streaming service available.

The extra numbers will undoubtedly mean a big boost for songs that do well with sales and streaming but can’t quite break into radio. “Harlem Shake,” for example, did an impressive 262,000 downloads last week, but is barely on satellite or terrestrial radio. It only scored a handful of impressions on radio, but its 103 million spins on YouTube easily confirm the track’s ubiquity.

The new tabulations have reconfigured the chart success of other songs that have been bigger than their old chart positions would have suggested. READ FULL STORY

Drake drops new single 'Started From the Bottom': Hear it here

Drake was supposed to debut his new single next weekend in the wake of the Grammys, but apparently Super Bowl fever overcame him and he just couldn’t wait.

Over the weekend, Drake unveiled “Started From the Bottom,” the first single from his still-untitled follow-up to his smash sophomore release Take Care. It deviates a bit from the norm for Drake, delving more into the hallucinogenic energy of Kendrick Lamar or A$AP Rocky.

Drake sets aside his warm croon for something a little harder and more confrontational, and there doesn’t seem like much crossover potential as a single, but the heads will certainly be happy. Give it a spin below: READ FULL STORY

Best and Worst 2012: Carly Rae Jepsen, Taylor Swift, and the other best singles of the year

Carly-Rae-Jepsen

One encouraging trend that ran throughout 2012 was the egalitarian nature of hit singles. Whether you were a Joni Mitchell-loving Canadian Idol survivor, an Australian with a bruised ego, or a bunch of Florida emo survivors high on Queen, the music world fully embraced you as long as your inescapable earworms continuously delivered thrilling results.

Check out EW’s list of the 20 greatest singles of the year below (as they appear in the current issue of EW, which is on newsstands now), and be sure to check out this specially-curated VEVO playlist that takes you through the year that was one glorious pop hook at a time.

BEST

1. Carly Rae Jepsen, ”Call Me Maybe”
Before the countless YouTube lip dubs, the nine weeks at No. 1, and the 1,000th time you heard it at a BBQ, there was just a song: a purple-ink love letter with a tiny voice whispering about wishing wells and ripped jeans like it was a secret she wanted you to keep forever. It might have been the soundtrack of your summer, or you might’ve rolled your eyes at parties but then secretly put it on your workout mix. But every time it played, life sounded just a tiny bit different. Better maybe. Adam Markovitz READ FULL STORY

Grammy Nominations 2013: Your water cooler cheat sheet!

The Grammy nominations are in — and by now, we hope you’ve had time to do the following: Read the full list of major nominees, peruse Kyle Anderson’s take on the biggest snubs and surprises, and enjoy Scooter Braun’s Twitter tantrum.

But if all that’s not enough for you, we’ve cobbled together some interesting trends about this year’s crop of Grammy nominees — so even if you’re not a Grammys aficionado, you can pretend to be one around the office.

* The Best Album category this year is oddly rock-heavy With the notable exception of Frank Ocean’s Channel Orange, the Best Album category is dominated by rock acts. But whereas the category (until very recently) used to feature the likes of Bruce Springsteen, Paul McCartney, and Robert Plant and Allison Krauss, it’s now honoring a newer crop of rockers.

Or, as one of my co-workers put it, “It’s like the Grammy voters have replaced their old fogies with young fogies.” The inclusion of The Black Keys’ El Camino and Jack White’s Blunderbuss feels especially odd, since both of those acts’ previous albums were substantially better than those efforts. (Though the White Stripes’ excellent 2004 release Elephant did get a nod that year.) Add in Mumford & Sons’s Babel and fun.’s Some Nights, and you’ve got a very dude-ish, very guitar-heavy category. READ FULL STORY

The 2012 MTV VMAs: Seven questions going into the show

About 20 years ago, everybody made the same joke: “How can MTV have a Video Music Awards when they don’t air videos anymore?” (And in our comments section, people still make that same joke every year.)

But think about it, has the show ever been about the actual Moonmen as much as it is about the zeitgeisty memes, outsized personalities, and general pageantry of the broadcast?

Think about last year’s show: While everybody remembers the Beyoncé baby-bump reveal, Lady Gaga’s drag show, and Adele’s tear-jerking triumph, does anybody recall what clip won Video of the Year? (It was Katy Perry’s “Firework.”) This year’s show, which beams live from Los Angeles’ massive Staples Center Thursday night at 8 PM Eastern, prides itself on first-run moments, including new tracks from Green Day and Alicia Keys and the first live performances of new singles by Taylor Swift and Pink.

But since there’s not a whole lot of investment in the winner of Best Male Video (unless you literally have invested something with your local bookie), here are the seven questions you should keep on your mind if you tune in. (And even if you don’t, you’re still invited to hang out with the Music Mix tomorrow evening, as we’ll have a live blog, photo galleries, and a full breakdown of the show’s best performances and biggest moments.)

How will host Kevin Hart do?
The VMAs have had some pretty big names host the show before, though there have really only been a handful of memorable ones (see: Eddie Murphy, Chris Rock, and pre-Fox News Dennis Miller). In the last few years, the role of host has been either ignored completely (neither the 2011 or 2007 shows had hosts) or given to people ill-suited for the job (Russell Brand, Chelsea Handler, and Jack Black all sort of punted it). READ FULL STORY

Drake, Chris Brown sued again over NYC club brawl

A model who was injured during a bottle-throwing nightclub brawl between Chris Brown and Drake sued both singers and the owners of the New York City nightclub on Monday.

Romain Julien, who was sitting at a nearby table during the brawl, suffered a severed tendon in his right hand during the June 14 melee, according to a lawsuit filed in New York Supreme Court. Julien also alleged that he endured lacerations from broken glass, cosmetic deformity and mental distress as a result of the fight.

The complaint accused Brown of having a “hot temper” and inciting the altercation with Drake.

The operators of the club Greenhouse and its basement lounge, W.i.P., are also named in the suit. Julien claimed the operators created a public nuisance by failing to provide adequate security in the club and serving liquor to intoxicated patrons.

Julien, a model with Re:Quest Model Management, is seeking actual and punitive damages. Representatives for Brown and Drake had no immediate comment. READ FULL STORY

Drake and Chris Brown sued for club brawl

Chris Brown and Drake were sued Wednesday over a bottle-throwing nightclub brawl involving their entourages, as a company with ties to the club sought to hold the music stars responsible for the melee.

Brown’s representatives had no immediate comment about the $16 million lawsuit, and Drake’s representatives didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. The suit faulted the artists for — at a minimum — doing nothing to stop the June 14 melee and said it sullied the chic Manhattan nightspot’s name.

Brown and Drake should bear blame for a glass-flinging, broken-bottle-swinging free-for-all in a crowded club “in circumvention of the venue’s extensive security measures,” says the lawsuit, filed by Entertainment Enterprises Ltd. The company owns the trademark for Greenhouse; the owners of the club itself aren’t involved in the lawsuit and declined to comment. READ FULL STORY

Drake releases his Aaliyah collaboration 'Enough Said': Hear it here

Drake’s been promising it for some time now, and yesterday, he finally delivered: his collaboration with the late R&B great Aaliyah.

The low-key track, titled “Enough Said” and produced by Drizzy pal Noah “40″ Shebib, features never-before-heard vocals from Aaliyah, 11 years after her death. Take a listen below:

READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Music

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP