The Music Mix Music news, reviews, albums, concerts, and downloads

Tag: Drake (61-70 of 121)

Album Sales: Michael Buble tops the chart (again), and Adele logs her best sales week yet

Michael-Buble

Michael Bublé’s Christmas has only been in stores for nine weeks, but it’s had no trouble becoming the 2nd highest-selling album of 2011, behind Adele’s 21.

This week, Bublé topped the Billboard 200 for a fifth straight week, selling 467,000 copies and lifting his holiday collection’s total to a very merry 2.43 million (all five of Michael Bublé’s albums have topped the 2 million mark). Expect a hefty drop next week, though, now that Christmas Day has passed.

In second place, Adele’s 21 notched its best-ever sales week (in its 45th week of release!), moving 399,000 units. The album’s previous best week came with its debut in February, when 21 sold 352,000. This year, 21 has sold an astonishing 5.68 million Stateside, and on top of reclaiming the No. 1 spot next week, the album should pass the 6 million mark early in the new year. READ FULL STORY

iTunes: Adele tops 2011's best-selling song and album charts

Did we need further evidence that this has been Adele’s year sales-wise? Probably not. But for the benefit of anyone still debating the matter, iTunes has just announced that the British singer’s track “Rolling in the Deep” was the year’s top downloaded song while its parent album, 21, was 2011’s most popular collection. iTunes also named Adele its Artist of the Year.

21 was followed on the album list by Mumford & Sons’ Sigh No More and Lil Wayne’s Tha Carter IV. LMFAO claimed second place on the singles list with “Party Rock Anthem” while Katy Perry’s “Firework” was third.

Find iTunes’ top ten best-selling songs and albums of 2011 below: READ FULL STORY

Michael Buble just barely beats Nickelback on the Billboard 200; Rihanna debuts at No. 3

Michael-Buble

In its fifth week on the chart, Michael Bublé’s Christmas climbed into the top spot on the Billboard 200, shifting just over 227,000 copies.

Thanks to a Black Friday sales boost, the album increased 37 percent from last week, thereby giving Bublé the best sales week of his career and lifting total sales to 745,000. It should pass 1 million by year’s end. READ FULL STORY

Drake's 'Take Care' leads Billboard album sales this week; Michael Buble and Adele follow

drake

This week’s Billboard chart reads like a U.N. summit — but sorry, America, you’re not really invited, unless you bring a whole lot of friends (and possibly a sad vampire or a glee club).

Toronto-born Drake’s Take Care drops in at no. 1 with sales of 631,000, making it the third-best-selling debut of the year behind Lady Gaga’s Born This Way (1.1 million) and Lil Wayne’s Tha Carter IV (964,000).

Drake’s fellow maple-leafer Michael Bublé follows in second place with 165,000 units of his Christmas sold, and Brit Adele holds strong at no. 3 with 113,000, continuing her insane run — now 39 straight weeks — in the top 5.

Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli sits at no. 4 with Concerto: One Night in Central Park (hey, at least he made it in New York — U.S.A! U.S.A.!) and yet another Canadian, Justin Bieber, grabs no. 5 with his own holiday outing, Under the Mistletoe.

England rides again at nos. 9 (Coldplay) and 10 (Susan Boyle), though there are in fact some local citizens on the list — it just turns out it takes a village, or more specifically a compilation, to get them there: Glee: The Music: The Christmas Album, Volume 2 sits at no. 6, Now 40 at no. 7, and Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, Part 1 at no. 8.

And a special mention goes to Childish Gambino, a.k.a. Community star Donald Glover (read EW’s recent feature on him here) whose hip-hop debut, Camp, slips in just outside of the top 10 at no. 11.

More on EW.com:
Adele, Maroon 5, and (yes) Miley Cyrus pay tribute to Bob Dylan on new album
Justin Bieber talks to David Letterman about baby scandal, weasels — watch the video here
Who is the greatest guitarist of all time? Prepare to be unsurprised!

American Music Awards 2011: Come for the performances by Maroon 5, Drake, Kelly Clarkson and others, stay for the sales bump

This Sunday, the 39th annual American Music Awards will be beamed into your living room live from the Nokia Theater in Los Angeles. The fact that they even hand out those strange props from 2001: A Space Odyssey as prizes is barely the point; did you actually remember that Justin Bieber walked away with four awards in 2010?

Even the show itself seems to know the actual statuettes are sort of arbitrary; they will be doled out according to fan voting, which means that the artists with the most mobilized internet presences will be walking away with new mantlepieces.

But the American Music Awards do prove useful for the music business — they provide a big, spangly event that showcases (most of) pop’s major artists right around the time that people are thinking of making their holiday music purchases.

Like many other businesses that rely on retail sales, the music industry always gets a huge boost during the holidays as people rush to fill stockings with new releases, holiday albums, iTunes gift cards, and luxury items like box sets and vinyl. Conveniently, the AMAs give artists with product to move a stage on which to make their pitches to a national television audience, provided that people actually tune in ( this Sunday night’s NFL game between the New York Giants and the Philadelphia Eagles promises to cut into the numbers some). READ FULL STORY

Drake's 'Take Care': Read the EW review

drake

One of the most hotly-anticipated albums of the fall hits store shelves both real and virtual today. Drake’s Take Care is already the top-selling album on iTunes and promises to find its way to the head of the Billboard chart despite its high-profile leak last week.

The walk-up to Take Care has been a little unusual, as a handful of the tracks from the album have been unleashed for free online in the months prior to its release (though a handful of those tracks didn’t end up on the final version of the album). It primed listeners for what was to come, though the results were even more dramatic than even first expected.

Check out the EW review of Take Care, a version of which will be appearing in the issue of the magazine hitting newsstands this Friday.

Drake
Take Care
(Young Money/Cash Money/Universal Republic)

On his platinum-selling 2010 debut, Thank Me Later, Drake managed to blend his special brand of understated Canadian ­swagger with surprisingly vulnerable ­reflections on the opposite sex. It didn’t reinvent the wheels of steel, but it acted as both a statement of his vast potential and a titillating wake-up call for hip-hop.

Unfortunately, his second album, Take Care—the bulk of which made its way online over the past several months via individual leaks by Drake himself—spends most of its 17 tracks hitting the snooze button. READ FULL STORY

Drake's new album 'Take Care' leaks; is it a bigger story now when albums don't?

Some time between Saturday night and Sunday morning, the entirety of Drake’s Take Care, the followup to his breakout 2010 debut Thank Me Later, found its way onto the Internet.

As news of the leak spread, Twitter exploded with chatter about it, and while any artists get extremely rankled when their music gets out prior to the release date (and, of course, for free), Drake himself was pretty casual about it. “Listen, enjoy it, buy it if you like it…and take care until next time,” he tweeted late last night.

The idea of an album leaking isn’t really a story. After all, pretty much everything leaks, and the timeline for Take Care is about right (the release date is next Tuesday, November 15, which means the finished album probably got lifted somewhere along the lines of production).

Drake’s casual reaction is the right one. After all, if people hadn’t gone out of their way to leak his album, that probably means people weren’t interested in the first place. An album leak is something of a validation, and though it may also feel like a backhanded (and bad for business) compliment, it still tells the artist, “You are big enough to steal from.”

It will probably cost Drake a little bit in album sales, but research shows that for a guy in Drake’s position, leaks don’t have as negative an impact as you might think — the logic being that people who will download the leak were unlikely to purchase the album in the first place. Plus, considering Drake himself had unleashed no fewer than six of the tracks from Take Care himself (including “Crew Love,” which showed up on Saturday on a radio station in Toronto), there was already plenty of Drake music out there for people to take.

In reality, it’s a bigger story when albums don’t leak. READ FULL STORY

Did Chris Brown knock Drake out in a fight over Rihanna? His rep says the story is 'completely fabricated'

Verbal battles are nothing new in hip-hop and R&B — but this one may have gotten physical.

During an interview with British radio host Tim Westwood, Artist and on-air personality DJ Whoo Kid mentioned offhand that he had witnessed an altercation between Drake and Chris Brown over the former’s relationship with Rihanna.

“Thank God there’s Drake right now,” Whoo Kid said. “He has at least eight records on the radio that’s killing it. Him and Rihanna supposedly fooled around. I think he got elbowed by Chris Brown, too, but that never came out.”

Whoo Kid didn’t mention a time or a place when this incident happened, but when asked for more details, he says he knows exactly where the blow was delivered.

“In the chin, like in the corner. Left part,” he explained to Westwood, who then asked what happened after that. “Man down. Simple as that.”

UPDATE: DJ Whoo Kid tweeted that he and Westwood were joking on the radio, and that “Chris Brown did not knock out Drake!” Brown’s publicist responded to the statement, noting “the Whoo Kid story is completely fabricated and not true.”

You can listen to the audio of the interview below. READ FULL STORY

Drake releases more free music for fans: Do you think dropping these gems for nothing's a good strategy?

Usually when artists kick their whole “I do it for the art, my fans and not the money or my label ” spiel, my impulse is to respond with, “Yeah, right.”

But Drake’s track record this summer more than backs up what he said to us a few weeks back about not caring about the restrictions his label place on him in regards to releasing freebies, as he did recently.

This past Saturday he dropped two songs, “Free Spirit” and “Club Paradise,” on his website. Both are cuts from recording sessions for his upcoming Take Care album.

Of course a record label or any sound-minded business would side against releasing their products for free. But Drake, who made his name off of releasing free mixtapes, believes otherwise.

So far he’s released Saturday’s offerings, “Dreams Money Can Buy,” and official album cuts “Marvin’s Room” and “Headlines,” without charge. The last two are now available for purchase on iTunes. Still, the fact that true fans could scoop them right from the man himself for nothing initially says plenty.

Moreover, they’re all quality works. “Free Spirit” is a treacherous, slow winding song on which he and Rick Ross urge women to tattoo their names on their bodies so that they’re always near, even when gone.

The piano-led “Club Paradise,” which Drake released for “our boy Avery…this was his favorite s— during the recording process,” finds Drake in a more pensive place—thinking about how wild it is that he’s gone from an unknown artist to being a spectator at high-end fashion shows.

“No wonder why I feel awkward at this Fashion Week s—/ No wonder why I keep f—in’ up the double cheek kiss,” he raps.

READ FULL STORY

Drake talks about making his upcoming album, growing as a rapper, and finding a mentor in Stevie Wonder: An EW Q&A

The summer’s nearly over. But rap wiz Drake is feeling the heat. The deadline to submit the final version of his sophomore album, Take Care, is one month out. To say the least, it’s crunch time. Though, it seems he’s comfy in the clutch.

While holed up in his “quaint” Toronto studio recently, Drake checked in with EW to give us a progress report on the album, due on his birthday, October 24. Creatively, he says he’s “at a great place” and has a tons a recorded material to select from.

In the EW story on stands now, he gave us five recording rules to live by. Here, though, we get into the rest of the conversation—one that includes, among other things, how Jay-Z and Kanye West’s Watch the Throne album impacted his project, how his song with Stevie Wonder might make you shed a tear, and why you won’t hear him crying about his riches this go around.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: In what ways are you challenging yourself this album?
DRAKE: I push myself in a lot of aspects when I write a song. I write a piece and where most people would stop and say “Oh, that’s the hook right there,” I’ll move that to the first four bars of the verse and do a new hook. That makes the song easy to learn and catchy. That’s how I like to challenge myself. I’ll write something and everyone that’s around might be like “Oh that’s that hook right there.” And then I’ll write something better than that.

How many tracks are you shooting for here?
Obviously, I can only fit so many songs on a CD. So what I’m doing is there will be a Take Care physical edition in stores that’ll hopefully have 15 to 17 songs on it. Then I know a lot of people do deluxe editions. But since October 24 is a special day for me, I got, like, a Take Care birthday edition that I’m going to put on iTunes that will have extra songs. I really want to encourage people to be excited about the album releasing. I remember how excited a lot of artists used to make me. I used to want to buy the physical copy to see the artwork. And if there were any bonus tracks, I’d go find them. I’m definitely trying to cause some of that excitement. I hope people go get the songs off the birthday edition. It’s going to be great, man. I’ve got a wide array of music this time. I’m very excited.

Talk to me about your team. Who are the people who are helping guide you through the album?
There are about three or four major opinions that I respect. Obviously, the main one would be [engineer and producer] 40 (Noah Shebib). He’s worked with me every single night I’ve set foot in the studio since Comeback Season. He knows what I’m capable of and he’s not afraid to say “You can do that better” or “That’s it” or “I know you can write a better verse than that.” And Oliver El-Khatib, who has progressed from my friend who just used to advise me on how to dress to a guy who came up with the artwork for So Far Gone to, since he’s such a creative brain, that he’s become one of my managers. Then my DJ Future the Prince has a great ear for music. And probably the most important person in the equation is Hush, who is a friend of mine who grew up rapping in Toronto and he’s present every night. If anyone knows what I’m capable of, it’s Hush. We love rap the same way and we have the same exact ear. So I know he’s hearing what I’m hearing. I never take criticism personally from anyone. I love feedback, but especially when it comes to Hush. He understands rap probably better than anyone else I mentioned. And he’s a close friend of mine.

Rap has become like fast food. Fans want it quickly and a lot of it. It’s only been a year since Thank Me Later and your fans seem to be starving for Take Care. Do you think they’ve forgotten that artists need life experiences to craft their art? READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Music

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP