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Tag: EW Playlists (11-20 of 48)

Big Data made us an eclectic electronic playlist

Big Data, a.k.a. Alan Wilkis, spends a lot of time thinking about heavy stuff, like the erosion of our privacy and how companies and the government exploit it. That admittedly paranoid worldview permeates pretty much everything he makes—including his song “Dangerous” and its hysterically gory video.

On the other hand, he’s also a pretty hardcore pop guy, and his sensibilities are accessible enough to land “Dangerous” at the top of the alternative rock charts. That side comes through loud and clear on the playlist that he put together for EW. Acts like Jungle and William Onyeabor that he chose aren’t exactly household names, but there’s an approachable, playful quality in pretty much all of his picks. The other major theme is that the tracks combine traditional instruments with electronics, a hybrid aesthetic that he himself works in. All in all it reflects his ability to challenge listeners in a way that they’ll actually enjoy.

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Hear 10 songs Joey Bada$$ is feeling right now

Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn’s Joey Bada$$ is only 19 years old, but he’s got a passion for old-school hip-hop—the kind you normally only find among fans who were buying rap tapes before he was even born.

Over the course of several increasingly popular mixtapes, he’s carved out a style rooted in what’s frequently referred to as the golden era of hip-hop, when a broad coalition of mostly East Coast acts like Gang Starr and A Tribe Called Quest were making seminal, boom-bap-heavy music that went a long way toward getting the genre taken seriously outside of the hip-hop community.

Right now, Joey’s prepping for the release of his debut solo album, B4.Da.$$. He took time out from his European tour to send EW a playlist of tracks that he has in heavy rotation right now. In true budding rap mogul style, about half the selections feature either him or a member of his Pro Era crew. That said, the left-field inclusion of Kiesza’s throwback club-pop burner “Hideaway”–and the hint that the two of them have a collaboration in the works–has us particularly excited.

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Mikky Ekko made EW a playlist for a weeknight pizza party

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Mikky Ekko, who you may know as Rihanna’s co-star in her mega-hit “Stay,” will release his debut album later this fall (side note/friendly PSA: it’s almost fall). The first single, “Smile” debuted earlier this month and bodes well for the upcoming collection: powerful vocals, delicate finishes, catchy, anthemic choruses.

The Louisiana native, who currently lives in Nashville, has been gaining major momentum, spending last summer touring with Jessie Ware, opening for Justin Timberlake in London in October and is currently working on highly-anticipated projects with artists like Zedd, Gwen Stefani, and Rihanna.

EW reached out to Ekko, asking him to put together a playlist for an occasion of his choosing. What did we get? “10 Tracks to Vibe Out Your Tuesday Night Pizza Party.” Fun, specific, and nuanced (in nature as well as naming), complete with commentary on each selection.

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Hear The Clash's virtual reunion with EW's homemade Clash 'Black Album'

In one of the best and most talked-about sequences in Richard Linklater’s instant classic film Boyhood, Ethan Hawke gives Ellar Coltrane a homemade compilation he calls The Black Album. It consists of solo tracks from each of the four Beatles, sequenced in a way that captures the magic the band were able to make when they were still a cohesive unit. “Basically, I’ve put the band back together for you,” Hawke wrote in the liner notes.

It’s such a good idea that EW decided to steal it. There are countless bands who have broken up and never circled back around to a cash-grab reunion, and we’ve begun with one of my absolute favorites: The Clash. The group didn’t officially stick a fork in it until 1986, but the bloom was well off the rose by the time drummer Topper Headon left the group just prior to the release of 1982’s Combat Rock. The relationship between co-leads Mick Jones and Joe Strummer were hopelessly strained by the end, and by the time the group released the disastrous Cut the Crap in 1985, Jones was already deep into his second life as the frontman for Big Audio Dynamite.

Like the Beatles before them, the members of the Clash did make up and collaborate on an individual basis after they broke up, but they never got the band back together (and once Strummer suddenly passed away in 2002, that door was officially closed for good). Still, here are 19 tracks (the same number that appeared on the watershed London Calling) from the post-Clash lives of the core four that re-capture the spirit of what made them sonically and philosophically revolutionary.  READ FULL STORY

Jangle-rockers Twin Peaks made us a playlist of 'catchy jams'

In a pop landscape that’s becoming increasingly dominated by synthesizers, Chicago has emerged as a bastion of good old-fashioned guitar rock. Underage quintet the Orwells are currently at the movement’s forefront, but right behind them are another young group from the Windy City: Twin Peaks. Earlier this year they toured with the Orwells, and recently they played the Pitchfork Music Festival.

The momentum Twin Peaks have been accumulating is about to get a big boost with the release of their second album, Wild Onion (out August 5 on Grand Jury), which is packed with sugary-sweet, jangly hooks and an endearing sort of reckless post-adolescent attitude. (Front man Cadien Lake James played Pitchfork in a wheelchair due to a shenanigans-related injury.)

EW reached out to the band members and asked them to put together a playlist, and bassist/singer Jack Dolan delivered one imaginatively titled “Jack’s Catchy Jams,” complete with commentary on each selection.

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The Black Keys' Essential Playlist

In honor of this week’s cover stars, we decided to compile an essential (but by no means comprehensive — they have eight studio albums alone) playlist for Akron’s prodigal blues-rock sons.

Stream it in full via Spotify below, and get our full Summer Music Preview, starring the Black Keys and their duct-tape-happy interrogator Danny McBride, on stands tomorrow:

 

Eat the Beat: The tastiest songs about food

With the release of her new album Food last week, singer and Le Cordon Bleu-certified chef Kelis has gone from “Milkshake” to full-on smorgasbord — tracks on the album include “Jerk Ribs,” “Cobbler” “Friday Fish Fry,” and “Biscuits n’ Gravy.”

But she’s hardly the first artist to find her muse on a menu. Place your order below—and stream our full food playlist (minus a few songs that weren’t available on Spotify; apologies to fans of both Pumpkins and egg-based condiments): READ FULL STORY

Spring playlist with Banks, Sam Smith, Lo-Fang and more: Listen now

Shake off a long, cold winter with these breezy new tracks from artists on the verge—slinky singers, bedroom R&B auteurs, and FoLs (Friends of Lorde).

Sam Smith, “Money on My Mind”
The Londoner’s swinging track—already a U.K. smash—pairs his aching voice with a groove fit for an energy-drink-stocked cocktail lounge. (It also helped nab him a slot on SNL.)

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Staff Picks: Stream our January playlist featuring Broken Bells, Angel Haze, Black Lips and more

Pop’s superstars may be busy picking out their Grammy outfits, but a relatively quiet post-holiday release time just means there’s more room for lesser-known names (and a few old-school alt icons) in our headphones.

Read on to stream some of our favorite songs from the likes of Stephen Malkmus, Mø, Dum Dum Girls, Sevyn Streeter, St. Vincent, Mogwai and more — all from just-released or upcoming albums.

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Remembering Nelson Mandela and the Songs of Freedom: A Playlist

At Nelson Mandela’s memorial in Johannesburg Tuesday, leaders from around the globe gathered to express their admiration for the beloved freedom fighter and former South African president. Viewers may have noticed that many mourners were singing. Music has always played a huge part in South African culture and Mandela’s own life. In this week’s issue of EW, editor Sean Smith takes a in-depth look at the pop world’s role in the anti-apartheid movement.

A wide range of artists, from westerners like Paul Simon to African musicians like Ladysmith Black Mambazo (pictured above) and Hugh Masekela, have found inspiration in Mandela’s cause and the sounds of his country. We’ve put together a Spotify playlist of some of our favorite tracks below.

Take a listen:

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