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Tag: Greg Dulli (1-7 of 7)

Afghan Whigs' Greg Dulli on reuniting the band, getting outplayed by Bob Odenkirk, and more

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When cultishly adored indie heroes Afghan Whigs first got back together in 2012, it was only going to be for a handful of shows. But then a few shows turned into a few more, and then more legs of an international tour.

Now Afghan Whigs are simply a band again — and they’re celebrating it with a new album, Do To The Beast, out April 15. This morning, they unveiled the album’s first single, “Algiers,” and premiered the video (both are below).

Frontman Greg Dulli spoke exclusively to EW about how Usher inspired the album, the inspiration for their new video, and how Breaking Bad‘s Bob Odenkirk scooped everybody on the album’s existence.

EW: So when did the idea of doing a record set in?
Greg Dulli: It was after we played the gig with Usher at South by Southwest in March. [Bassist] John [Curley] and I had dinner and talked about making a record. We decided that we should. We started in May, and I finished it on December 30, and there you have it.

Was there anything different about being in the studio this time, compared to the last time you guys recorded together?
I don’t think anything has changed for me studio-wise since I was a teenager. You go in with an idea, and you work it out until it becomes something you enjoy. Recording has always been very simple and therapeutic for me. No matter when and how I’ve done it, it’s always a very consistent experience. Sometimes it doesn’t go the way you want to, and there’s certainly successes and failures in anything, but I have a very zen approach to recording, honestly. It serves me well. READ FULL STORY

John Cale celebrates the music of Nico with Kim Gordon, Greg Dulli, Yeasayer, and more

Christa Päffgen was better known to the world as Nico, the German-born art-rock chanteuse who lent her haunting vocals to the Velvet Underground’s most seminal work and carved out a deeply influential solo career. Though she passed away nearly 25 years ago, her work (especially The Velvet Underground & Nico and her 1967 solo debut Chelsea Girl) still echoes with incredible resonance. Her style inspired multiple generations of Goth acts, quirky-voiced art belters like Bjork, and filmmakers like Wes Anderson (who used two Chelsea Girl recordings during key moments in The Royal Tennenbaums; it could be argued that Gwyneth Paltrow’s character in that movie was at least partially inspired by Nico herself). 

Friend and frequent collaborator John Cale, a founding member of the Velvet Underground and producer of several Nico solo albums, recognizes her impact better than anybody. That is why Cale produced last night’s show Life Along the Borderline: A Tribute to Nico at the Brooklyn Academy of Music as part of their Next Wave Festival. For a sense of how deeply Nico’s songs have been felt, one need only look at the lineup of guests and collaborators who filled BAM’s Gilman Opera House: Sonic Youth founder Kim Gordon, Sharon Van Etten, Afghan Whigs frontman Greg Dulli, the Kills singer Alison Mosshart, Joan as Police Woman, Peaches, and Brooklyn indie groovers Yeasayer.

Nico’s songs offer a lot of unique opportunities: Most of them are made up of very few elements, which allowed many of last night’s interpreters to deconstruct those elements and glue them back together at strange angles. READ FULL STORY

Indie rock supergroup Divine Fits cover Frank Ocean -- Watch it here

Image Credit: Pamela Littky

Divine Fits made the indie blogosphere very happy when they announced their formation earlier this year.

Comprised of Spoon’s Britt Daniel, Wolf Parade/Handome Furs’ Dan Boeckner, and New Bomb Turks’ Sam Brown, the Fits were destined to make waves among jangly garage aficionados.

But they’ve got their own love for major-label R&B: Check out a fan video of their performance of Frank Ocean’s “Lost,” taken from their performance at the Met in Pawtucket, RI, after the jump. READ FULL STORY

On the scene at New York's 'I'll Be Your Mirror' Festival Day 1: Frank Ocean, Philip Glass, and more

Image Credit: Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images

My editor warned me that All Tomorrow’s Parties – I’ll Be Your Mirror, the revered itinerant indie festival taking place in New York this weekend, would be a little unusual.

“There will be some women there,” she said, “but not many.”

And glancing over the lineup, she had a point. Curated in this edition by Greg Dulli of ’90s garage-rock heroes the Afghan Whigs — past curators include Neutral Milk Hotel’s Jeff Mangum, My Bloody Valentine, Modest Mouse, and even Simpsons creator Matt Groening —  the festival looked heavy on, well, obscure mid-‘90s garage rock.

Scrawl, Lightning Bolt, Godspeed You! Black Emperor – not surprisingly, I expected an audience of bearded men drinking microbrews. I was not disappointed.

It had the makings of a memorable (or insufferable) weekend: a young, eager music writer (I’m 23) watching many bands he’d never heard of, surrounded by old dudes who knew way, way more than me.

Held at Pier 36, a new entertainment complex on the Lower East Side right on the East River, the setup featured two stages: one inside the mammoth, carpeted auditorium, and the other in the parking lot, directly beneath the FDR highway. Friday’s comedians were quick to take note of the location. READ FULL STORY

Lollapalooza: Afghan Whigs' Greg Dulli has one festival goal: See Frank Ocean

The recently reconstituted Afghan Whigs have always known their way around a cover, and their most recent one might be their most winning yet.

The band has been playing Frank Ocean’s “Love Crimes,” a signature track from his critically-acclaimed 2011 mixtape nostalgiaULTRA, as part of their set since getting back together earlier this year. The band just recorded the track and gave it away on their website.

Frontman Greg Dulli’s appreciation for the alt R&B star runs deep: “I really want to see Frank Ocean Saturday night,” Dulli told EW in the Afghan Whigs’ dressing room just a few minutes before taking the stage for his own show. “He has such great words. He’s a great songwriter, and his words are really deep. The opening lines of the song, ‘Talk to me without hearing, touching me without feeling,’ I thought that was really intensely beautiful. He really has something. I saw him play in L.A. a couple of weeks ago, and it was a really phenomenal show.”

The Afghan Whigs had a pretty exceptional set themselves, making even their darkest tunes (especially the raucous “What Jail Is Like”) fly over the crowd in Chicago’s Grant Park –like the flock of geese who seemed particularly enthralled by Dulli’s vocalizations.

Oddly, the song that got the biggest reaction from the crowd was the group’s cover of Marie Queenie Lyons’ soul classic “See and Don’t See,” a quiet little burner that captured the attention of even the most shirtless-bro members of the masses.

Read More on EW.com:
Complete Music Festival Coverage at EW.com
Lollapalooza playlist: From Passion Pit to The Shins and more — LISTEN
Lollapalooza 2012: Five questions going into the weekend

Afghan Whigs live in New York City -- still dark and dangerous at their first show in 13 years

When I first joined Entertainment Weekly a little over a year ago, the deputy managing editor asked me who my favorite songwriter was. I answered unequivocally: Greg Dulli, the seedy mastermind behind great 21st-century soul-scuzz combos Twilight Singers and the Gutter Twins. While Dulli has rarely put out anything I didn’t like, my adoration for him begins with the Afghan Whigs, the Cincinnati-bred combo who released a half dozen albums’ worth of cocksure R&B for the alt-rock era.

The band parted ways in 1999, but last night at New York’s Bowery Ballroom, they returned. (The Whigs were supposed to make their grand reunion at the Dulli-curated All Tomorrow’s Parties festival in New Jersey this September, but considering the band’s last show was at the now-defunct New York club Hush, Dulli wanted to start the band right where they left off over a decade ago.) READ FULL STORY

Greg Dulli on curating All Tomorrow's Parties, getting the Afghan Whigs back together, and why Louis C.K. is like a pretty girl

Greg Dulli has spent the first decade and a half of the 21st century as the mastermind behind the Twilight Singers and the Gutter Twins, dressing up after-hours reveries in blues riffage, goth leanings, and tales of love gone awry. But that footprint began back in the ’90s with the Afghan Whigs, his cultishly-adored group of funk-loving, soul-stealing rockers from Cincinnati.

That band called it quits nearly 15 years ago, and now Dulli has reconstituted the group, which will make its grand return at this year’s All Tomorrow’s Parties festival in Asbury Park, New Jersey—an event that Dulli also happens to be curating.

In addition to the Whigs, his eclectic lineup includes the Roots, stand-up comic Louis C.K., Sharon Van Etten, Godspeed You! Black Emperor, and frequent collaborator Mark Lanegan. We spoke with Dulli about the reunion, the festival, and the haze of the ’90s.

EW: Which came first: The reunion or the call to curate All Tomorrow’s Parties?
Dulli: The best way I can describe it is that it was sort of a perfect storm of events. I did an acoustic tour a year and a half ago and John Curley, my dear friend and bass player in the Whigs, joined me for the show in Cincinnati, which we’ve done before when I pass through there. But then, I asked him, “Do you want to come up to Chicago and play?” He came up to Chicago and people freaked out. I finished up that tour on the west coast and I called him and I was like, “Hey man, do you want to do the west coast with me?” And he said yes. That was a great time. At that point, we began to play a few more Whigs songs in the show and I really enjoyed it. I rediscovered some songs that I had forgotten about and how much I enjoyed playing them. Then, when the Twilights tour last spring, we played Minneapolis where [Afghan Whigs guitarist] Rick [McCollum] lives. I had lunch with Rick. I hadn’t seen Rick in three or four years. We didn’t even talk about playing together but we had a really nice time at lunch. Then, he came to the gig and hung out. We were never at odds anyway so we didn’t have to get over any animosity. There were no hatchets to be buried. So when [All Tomorrow's Parties founder] Barry Hogan came around this last time was like, “Hey, do you want to?” I’m like, “Maybe.” My stance had just softened on the hardline and it seemed like if we were ever going to do it, this seemed like the right time to do it.

This can’t be the first time somebody has floated that idea. READ FULL STORY

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