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Tag: Ice Cube (1-7 of 7)

How did 'Freaks and Geeks' star Samm Levine ended up in Ice Cube's new 'Drop Girl' video? The actor explains

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There’s a lot going on in the just-released music video for Ice Cube’s “Drop Girl,” the latest single from his forthcoming album Everythang’s Corrupt: The giant heads of Cube and his collaborators RedFoo and 2 Chainz, more than a few female derrieres, and… Wait, is that Neal from Freaks and Geeks?

That is in fact Samm Levine as the lead scientist handling research on ladies’ behinds. “The truth of the matter is that anyone who knows me in my personal life knows that finding the perfect booty is something I’m deeply concerned with and have been for years,” Levine tells EW. “I actually run a lab out of my basement. Everyone there is a volunteer, they come on their own volition. When they asked if they could shoot the music video there, I had no problem with it. It was really more of a documentary than anything else.” READ FULL STORY

Aretha Franklin, Ice Cube among BET honorees

Legendary singer Aretha Franklin and Motown founder Berry Gordy will be honored at the 2014 BET Honors.

The network announced Thursday that rapper-actor Ice Cube, American Express CEO Ken Chenault, and photographer and video artist Carrie Mae Weems will also receive tributes at the event. The show will take place at the Warner Theatre in Washington on Feb. 8.

The special will air Feb. 24.

BET Honors highlights African Americans performing at top levels in the areas of music, literature, entertainment, education and more.

Halle Berry and Chaka Khan were among the honorees at last year’s BET Honors.

Actor and comedian Wayne Brady will host the special. Performers will be announced at a later date.

Fast talking at the end of the world: 15 thoughts on hip-hop's 1998 middle age

Just last week, one of the topics on EW Radio was the number of genre-defining hip-hop albums hitting their twentieth anniversaries this year.

Snoop Doggy Dogg’s Doggystyle, Wu-Tang Clan’s Enter The Wu-Tang (36 Chambers), A Tribe Called Quest’s Midnight Marauders, and Salt-N-Pepa’s Very Necessary all just wrapped their second decade. Those all represent different corners of the rap universe, and they all point to a crucial moment when hip-hop became such an overwhelming presence that mainstream culture had no choice but to move in its direction, rather than the other way around. The success of Dr. Dre’s The Chronic, which dropped in late ’92, started the trend, and it reached its apotheosis with the one-two punch of Notorious B.I.G.’s 1994 debut Ready to Die and Tupac’s 1995 crossover smash Me Against the World.

Plenty of rap records had found their way to the upper echelon of the charts, though they were primarily pandering or novelty tracks (in ’92, both Kriss Kross’ “Jump” and Sir Mix-A-Lot’s “Baby Got Back” became Hot 100 chart toppers). The albums from ’93 were purer hip-hop, and they were crafted by fantastically charismatic characters who were singular in their delivery and presentation. The success of Doggystyle was particularly jaw-dropping—listening to that album 20 years on, it still packs an incredible impact both as a unique piece of pop music and as a remarkably dirty statement of purpose.

Those albums are unimpeachable classics, and by design there’s not a whole lot more to add to that conversation. So let’s fast-forward five years to the albums from late ’98 that are now turning 15 years old. They represent a strange middle age for hip-hop, as its dominance on the pop chart began to be taken for granted and just about everybody began to lose their way.

There are plenty of notable big-ticket rap records from 1998′s fourth quarter, and none of them are classics. It could even be argued that not a single one of them is any good. But they do represent a culture in transition, and it’s a fascinating look at where hip-hop was and how it managed to get to the place it is now. So on the 15th anniversary of Busta Rhymes’ E.L.E. (Extinction Level Event): The Final World Front, Method Man’s Tical 2000: Judgment Day, Mystikal’s Ghetto Fabulous, Ice Cube’s War & Peace Volume 1: The War Disc, RZA’s Bobby Digital In Stereo, DMX’s Flesh of My Flesh, Blood of My Blood, Juvenile’s 400 Degreez, and Redman’s Doc’s Da Name 2000, here are 15 thoughts on the 15th anniversary of a weird time for hip-hop.

1. Everybody totally thought Y2K was going to be a real thing
For anybody too young or too unborn to remember Y2K, it seems utterly ridiculous. READ FULL STORY

Nas' 'Life Is Good,' Ice Cube's 'Raw Footage,' and the burden of aging in hip-hop

When Nasir “Nas” Jones was 20 years old, he released his 1994 debut album Illmatic, rightfully considered one of the finest albums in the history of rap music.

A confluence of factors contributed to its legendary status, including the fact that it came at a time when hip-hop was blasting its way onto pop radio and that, following the huge success of Dr. Dre’s L.A.-centric The Chronic in 1992, there was a general hunger for an East Coast counterpart. (New York obliged with not only Illmatic, but also the Notorious B.I.G.’s Ready to Die, and Wu-Tang Clan’s Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers).)

But even without any sort of context, Nas’s contribution would still be an all-time great — an album of twisty, brooding narratives delivered with the wisdom of a man twice his age and the skill of a master lyrical craftsman. (It also doesn’t hurt that the production on Illmatic is a delightfully icy mix provided by a team of legends including DJ Premier, Pete Rock, and Large Professor.)

Though that album will always (and rightfully) hold its spot in rap history, Nas has spent the subsequent 18 years learning a hard lesson in art (and especially in pop music): Sometimes you have nowhere to go but down. READ FULL STORY

Ice Cube finally resolves 'It Was A Good Day' theories: 'It's a fictional song'

The Internet is almost always used as a tool for evil, allowing criminals to access our bank accounts, marketers to try to sell us genital enhancement, and Kirk Cameron to promote his weird little movie about a monument that makes him cry.

And that’s OK, because there are enough adorable photos of kittens and the entirety of the greatest season of the Real World/Road Rules Challenge to keep us from rising up and setting servers ablaze from coast to coast.

Every once in a while, though, there are moments of incredible, transcendent greatness. Over the past few weeks, fans of both hip-hop and CSI-style investigating were in the thrall of a blogger who deduced that he had determined the exact day around which Ice Cube’s legendary hit “It Was a Good Day” was based. Cube drops a handful of clues throughout the track, including the fact that the Lakers beat the SuperSonics, there was no smog, and beepers were in use.

Need a refresher course? Spin “It Was a Good Day” below. READ FULL STORY

'Yo! MTV Raps' returns -- what's your pick for the greatest hip-hop clip of all time?

If there’s one thing that the recently-released oral history I Want My MTV got across, it’s the newsflash that the network no longer really cares about music (or at least not the way it did in the 1980s). Their forward-thinking philosophy has theoretically given them shark-like memories, though there are occasional bits of nostalgia that manage to sneak in between airings of Teen Mom and whatever Chelsea Settles is.

They’ve already moved 120 Minutes from a monthly show to a weekly one (albeit in a singularly painful timeslot, Friday mornings between 6 and 8 a.m.), and they just announced that they’re going to bring back Yo! MTV Raps for one night only on December 4.

The original show was a watershed moment in TV history, and undeniably helped move hip-hop into the mainstream — Though apparently, the audience was already fiending for it; that same oral history notes that the first episode of Yo! MTV Raps in 1988 instantly became the most-watched show in the network’s history.

The special Yo! MTV Raps Classic Cuts will take a look back at the show’s origins (a number of different people have taken credit for it’s creation, though most agree it wouldn’t have existed without late film director Ted Demme, who was then a PA at the network), its hosts (Dr. Dre, Ed Lover, and Fab 5 Freddy), and its cultural reach (namely making cultishly-adored rappers like Rakim into household names).

The show also promises to deep dive into three legendary clips that ran in heavy rotation during the show’s golden era: A Tribe Called Quest’s “Scenario” (featuring the debut of a crazy young MC from New York named Busta Rhymes), Geto Boys’ “My Mind’s Playing Tricks on Me,” and Ice Cube’s “It Was a Good Day.” While all of those are indeed classics in their own way, what other hip-hop videos from the show’s original run (1988-1995) qualify as the greatest? READ FULL STORY

Ice Cube on VH1's 'Behind the Music': Watch the preview -- EXCLUSIVE VIDEO

Rapper Missy Elliott launched the latest round of VH1′s Behind the Music episodes last week, and the next musician to get similar treatment is another rapper: Ice Cube. The episode — which premieres tomorrow, July 6 at 10 p.m. on VH1 — follows the three-decade-long career of Cube, tracing his way from his upbringing in South Central Los Angeles to being a founding member of NWA to eventually becoming an actor in movies like Friday and Are We There Yet?

Cube talks at length about his family and kids (two of which hope to follow in his footsteps!), and friends like Snoop Dogg, DJ Yella, and Nia Long talk about the rapper. EW has the exclusive first look at the episode. Watch the full, exclusive preview video here:

READ FULL STORY

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