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Tag: In Memoriam (11-20 of 323)

RZA releases Paul Walker tribute song 'Destiny Bends': Hear it here

Among those affected by Paul Walker’s death is Wu-Tang Clan leader RZA, who late last night released a tribute song to his friend and former coworker.

Titled “Destiny Bends,” the song was written shortly after word of Walker’s passing went public, RZA explains in the SoundCloud post.

“I met Paul on the set of the film Brick Mansion, where we talked, laughed, and exchanged ideas of life and fatherhood,” he wrote. “I only knew him personally for less than a year, but we knew each other through our work and art. We saw in each other a kindred spirit of men coming from unlikely circumstances, and rising to be the light and beacon of our family and loved ones.” 

RZA, who has been sidelining in films for a while now, said that he and Walker “had plans to continue working with each other in the future. … It seemed destined, but ‘destiny bends.’”

The track was composed by RZA and his two sons, with vocals by Will Wells. The post ended with the following note: “This song is not for criticism, it’s just a sketch demo. Please enjoy and reflect.”

Listen below:

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Yellow Dogs benefit concert to raise money for late musicians' families

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A week after a murder-suicide took the lives of two members of the Iranian band Yellow Dogs, a benefit concert in Brooklyn will raise money for the families of the deceased.

Last Monday, Ali Akbar Mohammadi Raffi opened fire on Yellow Dogs members Soroush Farazmand and Arash Farazmand, along with friend Ali Eskandarian, killing all three before turning the gun on himself. According to Brooklyn Vegan, Monday’s benefit concert at the Brooklyn Bowl will include Nada Surf, Dirty Fences, TV on the Radio’s Kyp Malone, and more musicians. Tickets, on sale now, are $15 to $30, and 100 percent of the proceeds go to the families.

Check out the poster for the memorial show below:
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Laurie Anderson on Lou Reed's last hours: 'I have never seen an expression as full of wonder'

Laurie Anderson already wrote a very touching, sweet tribute to her late husband Lou Reed, who passed away last Sunday, October 27. But in the pages of the current issue of Rolling Stone, she expands upon both her personal and professional life with Reed.

In the piece, she recounts how she first met Reed in Munich in 1992. She was familiar with some of his work — but admits that she had always assumed the Velvet Underground were British and was confused that Reed didn’t have an accent. Once they connected, they rarely looked back.

“Lou and I played music together, became best friends and then soul mates, traveled, listened to and criticized each other’s work, studied things together (butterfly hunting, meditation, kayaking),” Anderson wrote. “We made up ridiculous jokes; stopped smoking 20 times; fought; learned to hold our breath underwater; went to Africa; sang opera in elevators; made friends with unlikely people; followed each other on tour when we could; got a sweet piano-playing dog; shared a house that was separate from our own places; protected and loved each other. We were always seeing a lot of art and music and plays and shows, and I watched as he loved and appreciated other artists and musicians. He was always so generous. He knew how hard it was to do. We loved our life in the West Village and our friends; and in all, we did the best we could do.” READ FULL STORY

Patti Smith remembers Lou Reed: 'He was our generation's New York poet'

The most remarkable aspect of the cavalcade of tributes that have been written in the wake of Lou Reed’s death last weekend is that just about everybody—including his collaborators and friends—has written about him with a genuine sense of awe. That’s how powerful and influential a personality Reed was, and that’s how deeply he touched those who were closest to him.

Such is the case with Patti Smith, Reed’s sometime friend and fellow downtown denizen. In a lovely, poetic tribute published by The New Yorker, Smith talks about hearing of Reed’s passing, reflecting on New York in the ’70s, and connecting him to a long cavalcade of poets. She talks with great passion about running across Reed while she was building the Patti Smith Group. “Within a few years, in that same room upstairs at Max’s, Lenny Kaye, Richard Sohl, and I presented our own land of a thousand dances,” she wrote. “Lou would often stop by to see what we were up to. A complicated man, he encouraged our efforts, then turned and provoked me like a Machiavellian schoolboy. I would try to steer clear of him, but, catlike, he would suddenly reappear, and disarm me with some Delmore Schwartz line about love or courage. I didn’t understand his erratic behavior or the intensity of his moods, which shifted, like his speech patterns, from speedy to laconic. But I understood his devotion to poetry and the transporting quality of his performances.”

Check out the entirety Smith’s remembrance at The New Yorker, and be sure to also read the tributes by Reed’s wife Laurie Anderson and friend and collaborator Lars Ulrich.

Laurie Anderson brings 'joy' to the sad passing of Lou Reed

Since Lou Reed’s death on Sunday, posts on blogs and social networks have been going up 24/7. Many, touching accounts of how the legend’s music changed their lives. (Guilty.) Others, tearful RIP sentiments embedding favorite songs and YouTube clips eulogizing the rock iconoclast. (Guilty again.) For the lucky few, memories of The One Time They Ran Into Lou Reed; sometimes he was a total crank, sometimes he was a prince. (Sadly, none to share.)

But the best (and most anticipated) post about Lou Reed came today, and evokes what has been sorely lacking in the personal remembrances: “incredible joy.”

Writing for the East Hampton Star, Reed’s widow Laurie Anderson reminds us that Lou Reed lived a beautiful life, had one last perfect day, and that because of it, and the memories and songs he’s left us, it is indeed a “beautiful fall!”

Read Laurie Anderson’s full obituary below. Try to fight back that smile—and tear. Or don’t, actually. Just feel, as Anderson intends, the “incredible joy.”
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Metallica's Lars Ulrich on Lou Reed: 'He's the most direct, pure person I've ever met'

After Lou Reed passed away last Sunday at the age of 71, we reached out to one of his friends and collaborators, Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich, who worked with him on his last major recording project, the 2011joint album LuluHe spoke to us about his first introduction to the Velvet Underground as a kid growing up in Denmark, their first meeting at an amusement park years later, and what working with Reed was like.

“My dad had a music room across from my room in the house I grew up in in Copenhagen, Denmark. There would be all kinds of crazy stuff coming out of there from the late ‘60s and early ‘70s: Hendrix, the Doors, Miles Davis, Janis Joplin, John Coltrane, all that kind of stuff. Among the things that came out of that room at that time was the Velvet Underground. I maybe wasn’t super aware of that when I was six years old, but a few years later we moved to America and [my Dad and I] started exchanging music that we were passionate about. I would sit there and play Iron Maiden or Motorhead, and he would play me some crazy stuff. And I remember we had some pretty next-level sessions with ‘Heroin’ and ‘Sweet Jane,’ and with Rock ‘n’ Roll Animal, some of that stuff. This was the first time I sat and got into it on a different level, probably around 1980 or 1981.

So obviously that type of stuff had a tremendous impact. I wasn’t quite in tune with the cultural impact of the New York scene and what it all meant, but as a musical relationship, it was very rich, and I loved what I was hearing and I connected with what I was hearing. Some people will talk about ‘the forefather of punk music’ and all that type of stuff. I wasn’t able to put it together in that type of context at that time because I was only 16, but those were the first couple of times I experienced Lou. READ FULL STORY

Remembering Lou Reed: Why he mattered to kids like me

If Lou Reed hadn’t been Lou Reed, I probably wouldn’t be here. I don’t mean I wouldn’t be alive (I don’t think I was conceived to his music, but I definitely don’t intend to ask). But I wouldn’t be here, at this desk, in this office, writing, at Entertainment Weekly. I probably wouldn’t even be in New York — I’d be somewhere in suburban Michigan working as an accountant, or worse.

I’m not alone in this sentiment. A whole lot of folks I know, and even more people I don’t know, walk around thinking — if not explicitly, then in the back of their heads — that they wouldn’t be who they are if Lou Reed had never existed.

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Lou Reed and John Cale's 'Songs For Drella': Art's beating heart

Rock history is littered with band leaders who made game-changing contributions within the context of their groups, but struggled to make an impact on their own. For all the mind-blowing tunes he dealt out with the Rolling Stones, Mick Jagger’s solo output is pretty embarrassing, and though some of his post-Talking Heads music has been legitimately wonderful, David Byrne has never been able to replicate the Heads’ collective magic.

Not Lou Reed. His work with the Velvet Underground is rightfully heralded as legendary, but his solo career was just as powerful and inspiring. Throughout his solo run, Reed felt free to explore all sides of his personality, from the theatrical glam of Transformer to the sweet subversive pop of Coney Island Baby to the brutal drone of Berlin. Not all of his dalliances were successful—not even contrarian hipsters cop to liking the notoriously unlistenable Metal Machine Music, and his Metallica tag-team Lulu is problematic at best—but he took bold chances and hit more than he missed. READ FULL STORY

Morrissey posts tribute to Lou Reed: 'He will always be pressed to my heart'

There are a lot of things Morrissey does not care for, but Lou Reed isn’t one of them. The Smiths frontman has expressed his reverence for Reed many times over the years, and yesterday he posted a short, moving tribute to his idol online.

Posted on True to You, a Moz fan site, the Pope of Mope wrote of the late Velvet Underground (and beyond) singer:

‘Oh Lou / why did you leave us this way?’

No words to express the sadness at the death of Lou Reed. He had been there all of my life. He will always be pressed to my heart. Thank God for those, like Lou, who move within their own laws, otherwise imagine how dull the world would be. I knew the Lou of recent years and he was always full of good heart. His music will outlive time itself.
 We are all timebound, but today, with the loss of liberating Lou, life is a pigsty.

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Velvet Underground's John Cale on Lou Reed: 'I've lost my school-yard buddy'

Though they founded the Velvet Underground together and collaborated on and off for nearly half a century, Lou Reed and John Cale had a relatively contentious relationship over the course of their intertwined careers. (As recently as earlier this year, Cale expressed consternation over Reed reviving their Andy Warhol tribute project Songs For Drella.)

But that was put aside following the news of Reed’s passing. Cale took to his Facebook page yesterday to express his thoughts on his former bandmate in the wake of his death. “The world has lost a fine songwriter and poet,” Cale wrote. “I’ve lost my ‘school-yard buddy.’”

Reed, Cale, Sterling Morrison and drummer Maureen Tucker launched the Velvet Underground in the mid 1960s and produced two albums together—1967′s The Velvet Underground and Nico and 1968′s White Light/White Heat—before Cale was replaced by Doug Yule for the band’s 1969 self-titled album. Cale and Reed clashed over control of the band and its direction, with Cale always trying to pull more and more into the droning sounds of tracks like “Venus In Furs.”

Since leaving the Velvet Underground, Cale had a moderately successful solo career (his signature album, 1973′s Paris 1919, is a classic of the genre) and has also done well as a producer, primarily for late former VU chanteuse Nico.

In 1989, Reed and Cale came together following the death of mutual friend and mentor Andy Warhol. The pair had not spoken to one another for years before Warhol’s memorial service in 1987, and they reunited in 1990 to write a song cycle about Warhol called Songs For Drella. Though they didn’t tour, they did make a concert film shot by ace cinematographer Ed Lachman, which is hard to find but well worth seeing. Cale and Reed last worked together on the Velvet Underground reunion tour in 1993.

Reed passed away yesterday, October 27. The cause of death has still yet to be announced, though he had recently undergone surgery for a liver transplant.

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