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Tag: In Memoriam (11-20 of 327)

Lord Infamous, rapper with Three 6 Mafia, has died

Groundbreaking rapper Ricky Dunigan, who rhymed under the name Lord Infamous, passed away on Friday night at his mother’s home in Memphis. He was 40 years old. The cause of death is currently unknown.

Dunigan helped form the Memphis-based rap collective Three 6 Mafia in 1991 alongside DJ Paul (Paul Beauregard) and Juicy J (Jordan Houston). Infamous drifted in and out of the group since its inception, and his most recent recording was a 2013 mixtape as a part of the group Da Mafia 6ix, which consisted of several members of Three 6 Mafia.

“R.I.P. lord infamous,” Juicy J wrote on Twitter on Saturday. Fellow Mafia member Gangsta Boo also tweeted out condolences. “Rest in Peace Lord Infamous please respect the family and dear friends during this tragedy. I will never forget the shows we rocked together . My heart is in pieces.”

Infamous had suffered a heart attack and a stroke in 2010, though a statement from Infamous’ publicist indicated that it was unclear whether or not his health issues played into his passing.

Da Mafia 6ix were scheduled to release their proper debut album in 2014.

Jazz guitarist Jim Hall dies at 83

Jim Hall, one of the leading jazz guitarists of the modern era, whose subtle technique, lyrical sound and introspective approach strongly influenced younger proteges such as Pat Metheny and Bill Frisell, died early Tuesday at age 83, his wife said.

Hall died in his sleep after a short illness at his Greenwich Village apartment in Manhattan, said Jane Hall, his wife of 48 years who described her husband as “truly beloved by everybody who ever met him.” READ FULL STORY

Watch R. Kelly perform his Nelson Mandela tribute song 'Soldier's Heart'

While primarily known as a the dude behind Trapped in the Closet, R. Kelly has also been active in celebrating and supporting the music and culture of Africa.

In fact, Kelly once wrote a song for the late Nelson Mandela called “Soldier’s Heart,” which he performed for Mandela in his home several years ago. Last night on The Arsenio Hall Show, Kelly stopped by to talk about meeting Mandela and performed “Soldier’s Heart” by himself at the piano. Check it out below.  READ FULL STORY

Reggae singer Junior Murvin dead at 67

Reggae singer Junior Murvin, best known for the hit song “Police and Thieves,” has died in Jamaica.

Son Keith Smith says the 67-year-old performer died at Port Antonio Hospital on Monday. He had been hospitalized recently for diabetes and high blood pressure but the cause of death will be determined at an inquest.

Born Murvin Smith, he began his career as a lounge singer in Portland parish, east of Kingston. He released “Police and Thieves” in 1976 after he was picked up by famed reggae producer Lee “Scratch” Perry.

“Police and Thieves” became a hit in Britain and is considered among the top reggae songs. The Clash recorded a well-known cover version.

Murvin never had another big international hit.

He is survived by five children and eight grandchildren.

Listen to “Police and Thieves” below:
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RZA releases Paul Walker tribute song 'Destiny Bends': Hear it here

Among those affected by Paul Walker’s death is Wu-Tang Clan leader RZA, who late last night released a tribute song to his friend and former coworker.

Titled “Destiny Bends,” the song was written shortly after word of Walker’s passing went public, RZA explains in the SoundCloud post.

“I met Paul on the set of the film Brick Mansion, where we talked, laughed, and exchanged ideas of life and fatherhood,” he wrote. “I only knew him personally for less than a year, but we knew each other through our work and art. We saw in each other a kindred spirit of men coming from unlikely circumstances, and rising to be the light and beacon of our family and loved ones.” 

RZA, who has been sidelining in films for a while now, said that he and Walker “had plans to continue working with each other in the future. … It seemed destined, but ‘destiny bends.'”

The track was composed by RZA and his two sons, with vocals by Will Wells. The post ended with the following note: “This song is not for criticism, it’s just a sketch demo. Please enjoy and reflect.”

Listen below:

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Yellow Dogs benefit concert to raise money for late musicians' families

Yellow-Dogs.jpg

A week after a murder-suicide took the lives of two members of the Iranian band Yellow Dogs, a benefit concert in Brooklyn will raise money for the families of the deceased.

Last Monday, Ali Akbar Mohammadi Raffi opened fire on Yellow Dogs members Soroush Farazmand and Arash Farazmand, along with friend Ali Eskandarian, killing all three before turning the gun on himself. According to Brooklyn Vegan, Monday’s benefit concert at the Brooklyn Bowl will include Nada Surf, Dirty Fences, TV on the Radio’s Kyp Malone, and more musicians. Tickets, on sale now, are $15 to $30, and 100 percent of the proceeds go to the families.

Check out the poster for the memorial show below:
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Laurie Anderson on Lou Reed's last hours: 'I have never seen an expression as full of wonder'

Laurie Anderson already wrote a very touching, sweet tribute to her late husband Lou Reed, who passed away last Sunday, October 27. But in the pages of the current issue of Rolling Stone, she expands upon both her personal and professional life with Reed.

In the piece, she recounts how she first met Reed in Munich in 1992. She was familiar with some of his work — but admits that she had always assumed the Velvet Underground were British and was confused that Reed didn’t have an accent. Once they connected, they rarely looked back.

“Lou and I played music together, became best friends and then soul mates, traveled, listened to and criticized each other’s work, studied things together (butterfly hunting, meditation, kayaking),” Anderson wrote. “We made up ridiculous jokes; stopped smoking 20 times; fought; learned to hold our breath underwater; went to Africa; sang opera in elevators; made friends with unlikely people; followed each other on tour when we could; got a sweet piano-playing dog; shared a house that was separate from our own places; protected and loved each other. We were always seeing a lot of art and music and plays and shows, and I watched as he loved and appreciated other artists and musicians. He was always so generous. He knew how hard it was to do. We loved our life in the West Village and our friends; and in all, we did the best we could do.” READ FULL STORY

Patti Smith remembers Lou Reed: 'He was our generation's New York poet'

The most remarkable aspect of the cavalcade of tributes that have been written in the wake of Lou Reed’s death last weekend is that just about everybody—including his collaborators and friends—has written about him with a genuine sense of awe. That’s how powerful and influential a personality Reed was, and that’s how deeply he touched those who were closest to him.

Such is the case with Patti Smith, Reed’s sometime friend and fellow downtown denizen. In a lovely, poetic tribute published by The New Yorker, Smith talks about hearing of Reed’s passing, reflecting on New York in the ’70s, and connecting him to a long cavalcade of poets. She talks with great passion about running across Reed while she was building the Patti Smith Group. “Within a few years, in that same room upstairs at Max’s, Lenny Kaye, Richard Sohl, and I presented our own land of a thousand dances,” she wrote. “Lou would often stop by to see what we were up to. A complicated man, he encouraged our efforts, then turned and provoked me like a Machiavellian schoolboy. I would try to steer clear of him, but, catlike, he would suddenly reappear, and disarm me with some Delmore Schwartz line about love or courage. I didn’t understand his erratic behavior or the intensity of his moods, which shifted, like his speech patterns, from speedy to laconic. But I understood his devotion to poetry and the transporting quality of his performances.”

Check out the entirety Smith’s remembrance at The New Yorker, and be sure to also read the tributes by Reed’s wife Laurie Anderson and friend and collaborator Lars Ulrich.

Laurie Anderson brings 'joy' to the sad passing of Lou Reed

Since Lou Reed’s death on Sunday, posts on blogs and social networks have been going up 24/7. Many, touching accounts of how the legend’s music changed their lives. (Guilty.) Others, tearful RIP sentiments embedding favorite songs and YouTube clips eulogizing the rock iconoclast. (Guilty again.) For the lucky few, memories of The One Time They Ran Into Lou Reed; sometimes he was a total crank, sometimes he was a prince. (Sadly, none to share.)

But the best (and most anticipated) post about Lou Reed came today, and evokes what has been sorely lacking in the personal remembrances: “incredible joy.”

Writing for the East Hampton Star, Reed’s widow Laurie Anderson reminds us that Lou Reed lived a beautiful life, had one last perfect day, and that because of it, and the memories and songs he’s left us, it is indeed a “beautiful fall!”

Read Laurie Anderson’s full obituary below. Try to fight back that smile—and tear. Or don’t, actually. Just feel, as Anderson intends, the “incredible joy.”
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Metallica's Lars Ulrich on Lou Reed: 'He's the most direct, pure person I've ever met'

After Lou Reed passed away last Sunday at the age of 71, we reached out to one of his friends and collaborators, Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich, who worked with him on his last major recording project, the 2011joint album LuluHe spoke to us about his first introduction to the Velvet Underground as a kid growing up in Denmark, their first meeting at an amusement park years later, and what working with Reed was like.

“My dad had a music room across from my room in the house I grew up in in Copenhagen, Denmark. There would be all kinds of crazy stuff coming out of there from the late ‘60s and early ‘70s: Hendrix, the Doors, Miles Davis, Janis Joplin, John Coltrane, all that kind of stuff. Among the things that came out of that room at that time was the Velvet Underground. I maybe wasn’t super aware of that when I was six years old, but a few years later we moved to America and [my Dad and I] started exchanging music that we were passionate about. I would sit there and play Iron Maiden or Motorhead, and he would play me some crazy stuff. And I remember we had some pretty next-level sessions with ‘Heroin’ and ‘Sweet Jane,’ and with Rock ‘n’ Roll Animal, some of that stuff. This was the first time I sat and got into it on a different level, probably around 1980 or 1981.

So obviously that type of stuff had a tremendous impact. I wasn’t quite in tune with the cultural impact of the New York scene and what it all meant, but as a musical relationship, it was very rich, and I loved what I was hearing and I connected with what I was hearing. Some people will talk about ‘the forefather of punk music’ and all that type of stuff. I wasn’t able to put it together in that type of context at that time because I was only 16, but those were the first couple of times I experienced Lou. READ FULL STORY

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