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Tag: In Memoriam (21-30 of 323)

The essential Lou Reed and Velvet Underground: Stream our Spotify playlist here

Lou Reed made music from the early 1960s right up until his death this weekend at age 71, so it’s hard to do his career justice in a single playlist. But the EW staff has compiled a list of 28 tracks from VU and his solo career that at least gives a snapshot of his musical legacy.

Check out our (nonlinear) list below, and share some of your own favorite tracks in the comments.
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Pogues guitarist Phil Chevron dies

Phil Chevron, guitarist of the Pogues, died in Dublin today at the age of 56, the AP reports. According to his manager, Chevron was being treated for head and neck cancer.

The Irish-born Chevron — born Philip Ryan — had been a member of the Celtic folk-punk band since the ’80s; his credits include the popular fan favorites “Thousands Are Sailing” and “Lorelei,” among others. Before joining the Pogues, he was already an important figure in the Irish punk scene thanks to the Radiators in Space, the band he started in 1976.

On the website pogues.com, the band released the following short statement: “After a long illness Philip passed away peacefully this morning. We all send our sincere condolences to his family.”

Kris Kross singer died of drug overdose, says medical examiner

Chris Kelly of the ’90s rap duo Kris Kross died of a drug overdose, a medical office investigator said Monday.

A toxicology screening revealed that Kelly, 34, had a mixture of drugs in his system when he was pronounced dead on May 1, said Betty Honey of the Fulton County Medical Examiner’s office in Atlanta.

Paramedics found Kelly unresponsive on a living room couch at his Atlanta home and tried to resuscitate him. Kelly, known as “Mac Daddy,” was later pronounced dead at a local hospital.

Honey said she did not know which specific drugs Kelly had used before his death. However, a police report from the night of Kelly’s death said his mother told investigators her son used cocaine and heroin the night before he died and had a history of drug abuse. READ FULL STORY

Devo drummer Alan Myers dies of brain cancer

Alan Myers, the former longtime drummer for the band Devo, best known for “Whip It,” has died after a battle with brain cancer. He was 58.

Myers died Monday in Los Angeles, where he lived, Devo spokesman Michael Pilmer said Wednesday.

Myers was the band’s drummer from 1976 to 1985 during Devo’s heyday. The group was formed in Akron, Ohio, in the early 70s by Mark Mothersbaugh and Gerald Casale, and introduced themselves to the world in 1977 by making a spastic version of the Rolling Stones’ “Satisfaction.”

Casale told The Associated Press on Wednesday that without Myers, Devo never would have reached the heights it did, calling him the best drummer he has ever played with.
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Blues singer Bobby 'Blue' Bland dies at 83

Bobby “Blue” Bland, a distinguished singer who blended Southern blues and soul in songs such as “Turn on Your Love Light” and “Further On Up the Road,” died Sunday. He was 83.

Rodd Bland said his father died due to complications from an ongoing illness at his Memphis, Tenn., home. He was surrounded by relatives.

Bland was known as the “the Sinatra of the blues” and was heavily influenced by Nat King Cole, often recording with lavish arrangements to accompany his smooth vocals. He even openly imitated Frank Sinatra on the Two Steps From the Blues album cover, standing in front of a building with a coat thrown over his shoulder. READ FULL STORY

Country singer Slim Whitman dies at age 90

Country singer Slim Whitman, the high-pitched yodeler who sold millions of records through ever-present TV ads in the 1980s and 1990s and whose song saved the world in the film comedy Mars Attacks!, died Wednesday at a Florida hospital. He was 90.

Whitman died of heart failure at Orange Park Medical Center, his son-in-law Roy Beagle said.

Whitman’s tenor falsetto and ebony mustache and sideburns became global trademarks — and an inspiration for countless jokes — thanks to the TV commercials that pitched his records.

But he was a serious musical influence on early rock, and in the British Isles, he was known as a pioneer of country music for popularizing the style there. Whitman also encouraged a teen Elvis Presley when he was the headliner on the bill and the young singer was making his professional debut.
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Clarence Burke Jr, lead singer of the Five Stairsteps, dies

Clarence Burke Jr., lead singer of the group the Five Stairsteps that sang the 1970 hit “O-o-h Child,” has died. He was 64.

Burke died on Sunday — a day after his birthday — in Marietta, Ga., where he lived, said Joe Marno, his friend and manager.

The cause of his death was not disclosed.

Formed in Chicago in 1965, the Five Stairsteps included Burke, three of his brothers and a sister. They owed their name to their mother, who said that they looked like stairsteps when they stood beside each other in order of age, the Los Angeles Times reported.

Burke, the eldest brother, was the group’s producer and choreographer, played guitar and wrote many of the songs. He wrote the group’s first single, “You Waited Too Long.” He was not yet 17 when it rose to No. 6 on Billboard’s R&B charts in 1966.

Other hits included “World of Fantasy,” “Don’t Change Your Love,” and “From Us to You.”

However, the group’s biggest hit was 1970′s “O-o-h Child,” written by Stan Vincent. Its signature refrain croons “o-o-h child” and promises that “things are gonna get easier.”

The song has been covered many times and has repeatedly been used in movies and TV shows.

Rolling Stone magazine ranked it No. 402 on its list of the 500 greatest songs of all time.

The group disbanded in the late 1970s but the brothers briefly reformed as the Invisible Man’s Band and had a 1980 success with the dance single “All Night Thing.”

In recent years, Burke performed solo concerts and continued to record with family and friends, according to a family memorial.

Singer and producer Romanthony, best known for Daft Punk's 'One More Time,' has died

romanthony.jpg

Singer, DJ, and house music producer Anthony Moore, who went by the stage name Romanthony, passed away last week at his home in Austin at the age of 46. His family confirmed his passing today, and said the cause was kidney disease.

Though he released four albums of his own, Romanthony is best known as the voice behind Daft Punk’s “One More Time.” Though it was completed in 1998, the track wasn’t released as a single until 2000, and later appeared on Daft Punk’s 2001 album Discovery. (Moore also provided vocals for the album’s closing track, “Too Long.”)

Moore also operated his own label, Black Male Records, through which he released his albums and singles. His music was nominally all filed under the “house” genre, but it was hardly confined to it, also reaching into techno, funk, hip-hop, and beyond.

Listen to “One More Time” and Romanthony’s solo release “Make This Love Right (Tronic Dub)” below:

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Funeral for Kris Kross rapper scheduled for Atlanta

Mourners are set to gather for the funeral of former Kris Kross rapper Chris Kelly in Atlanta.

Kelly’s funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at Jackson Memorial Baptist Church. The 34-year-old was found dead May 1 of a suspected drug overdose.

Kriss Kross was introduced to the music world in 1992 by music producer-rapper Jermaine Dupri after he discovered the pair at a mall in southwest Atlanta. Kelly, who was known as “Mac Daddy,” performed alongside Chris Smith, who was known as “Daddy Mac.” The duo wore their clothes backward as a gimmick, but they won over fans with their raps.

Their first, and by far most successful song, was the 1992 hit “Jump,” which became a No. 1 smash in the United States and globally.

Read more:
Rapper Chris Kelly dead at 34
Kris Kross to reunite for one magical night

Jeff Hanneman is gone, but Slayer is forever

When I was 10 years old, Slayer scared the hell out of me. It wasn’t the punishing music or the satanic themes. I worshipped at the altar of Metallica, Megadeth, Exodus, Celtic Frost, Mercyful Fate and their like in the mid-1980s. Speed, Satan, violence, aggression — that’s what kept me going during my “awkward years.” Yet I was intimidated by Slayer.

It was because of the fans. READ FULL STORY

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