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Tag: In Memoriam (31-40 of 327)

Clarence Burke Jr, lead singer of the Five Stairsteps, dies

Clarence Burke Jr., lead singer of the group the Five Stairsteps that sang the 1970 hit “O-o-h Child,” has died. He was 64.

Burke died on Sunday — a day after his birthday — in Marietta, Ga., where he lived, said Joe Marno, his friend and manager.

The cause of his death was not disclosed.

Formed in Chicago in 1965, the Five Stairsteps included Burke, three of his brothers and a sister. They owed their name to their mother, who said that they looked like stairsteps when they stood beside each other in order of age, the Los Angeles Times reported.

Burke, the eldest brother, was the group’s producer and choreographer, played guitar and wrote many of the songs. He wrote the group’s first single, “You Waited Too Long.” He was not yet 17 when it rose to No. 6 on Billboard’s R&B charts in 1966.

Other hits included “World of Fantasy,” “Don’t Change Your Love,” and “From Us to You.”

However, the group’s biggest hit was 1970’s “O-o-h Child,” written by Stan Vincent. Its signature refrain croons “o-o-h child” and promises that “things are gonna get easier.”

The song has been covered many times and has repeatedly been used in movies and TV shows.

Rolling Stone magazine ranked it No. 402 on its list of the 500 greatest songs of all time.

The group disbanded in the late 1970s but the brothers briefly reformed as the Invisible Man’s Band and had a 1980 success with the dance single “All Night Thing.”

In recent years, Burke performed solo concerts and continued to record with family and friends, according to a family memorial.

Singer and producer Romanthony, best known for Daft Punk's 'One More Time,' has died

romanthony.jpg

Singer, DJ, and house music producer Anthony Moore, who went by the stage name Romanthony, passed away last week at his home in Austin at the age of 46. His family confirmed his passing today, and said the cause was kidney disease.

Though he released four albums of his own, Romanthony is best known as the voice behind Daft Punk’s “One More Time.” Though it was completed in 1998, the track wasn’t released as a single until 2000, and later appeared on Daft Punk’s 2001 album Discovery. (Moore also provided vocals for the album’s closing track, “Too Long.”)

Moore also operated his own label, Black Male Records, through which he released his albums and singles. His music was nominally all filed under the “house” genre, but it was hardly confined to it, also reaching into techno, funk, hip-hop, and beyond.

Listen to “One More Time” and Romanthony’s solo release “Make This Love Right (Tronic Dub)” below:

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Funeral for Kris Kross rapper scheduled for Atlanta

Mourners are set to gather for the funeral of former Kris Kross rapper Chris Kelly in Atlanta.

Kelly’s funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at Jackson Memorial Baptist Church. The 34-year-old was found dead May 1 of a suspected drug overdose.

Kriss Kross was introduced to the music world in 1992 by music producer-rapper Jermaine Dupri after he discovered the pair at a mall in southwest Atlanta. Kelly, who was known as “Mac Daddy,” performed alongside Chris Smith, who was known as “Daddy Mac.” The duo wore their clothes backward as a gimmick, but they won over fans with their raps.

Their first, and by far most successful song, was the 1992 hit “Jump,” which became a No. 1 smash in the United States and globally.

Read more:
Rapper Chris Kelly dead at 34
Kris Kross to reunite for one magical night

Jeff Hanneman is gone, but Slayer is forever

When I was 10 years old, Slayer scared the hell out of me. It wasn’t the punishing music or the satanic themes. I worshipped at the altar of Metallica, Megadeth, Exodus, Celtic Frost, Mercyful Fate and their like in the mid-1980s. Speed, Satan, violence, aggression — that’s what kept me going during my “awkward years.” Yet I was intimidated by Slayer.

It was because of the fans. READ FULL STORY

Slayer guitarist Jeff Hanneman dies

Jeff Hanneman, guitarist for legendary thrash metal band Slayer, has died of liver failure. He was 49. The band posted the news on their website and Facebook page Thursday. Hanneman founded the band with fellow guitarist Kerry King in 1981 and created a sound influenced by heavy metal and punk, writing Slayer classics like “Raining Blood” and “Angel of Death.”

The full statement on Slayer’s website reads:

Slayer is devastated to inform that their bandmate and brother, Jeff Hanneman, passed away at about 11AM this morning near his Southern California home. Hanneman was in an area hospital when he suffered liver failure. He is survived by his wife Kathy, his sister Kathy and his brothers Michael and Larry, and will be sorely missed.

In 2011, Hanneman suffered a spider bite and contracted a flesh-eating disease, taking time off from the band to recuperate, but it is unclear if this contributed to his death.
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Chris Kelly of Kris Kross dead at 34

Rapper Chris Kelly, best known as one half of the rap duo Kris Kross, has died, the Fulton County Medical Examiner’s Office confirms to EW. He was 34.

Kelly (pictured, right) was reportedly found unresponsive at his Atlanta home Wednesday afternoon. No further details are currently available.

In the 1990s, Kris Kross — which comprised of Kelly and Chris Smith — was best known for their hit song “Jump” and wearing their clothes backward. In 1992, when both singers were just 13 years old, their debut album, Totally Krossed Out, was released and went on to sell four million copies in the U.S.

Performers and speakers announced for George Jones' funeral, plus how to watch it

Plans have been announced for George Jones’ public funeral, taking place Thursday at The Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville. The service will include music from Brad Paisley, Alan Jackson, Randy Travis, Vince Gill and Patty Loveless, Charlie Daniels, The Oak Ridge Boys, Kid Rock, Ronnie Milsap, Travis Tritt, Tanya Tucker, and Wynonna. Kenny Chesney will speak, as will Former First Lady Laura Bush, Grand Ole Opry VP&GM Pete Fisher, Governor Bill Haslam, former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee, Barbara Mandrell, and CBS News’ Chief Washington Correspondent Bob Schieffer.

The service, which will begin at 11 a.m. ET, will be broadcast live on CMT, GAC, RFD, and FamilyNet, as well as local Nashville stations. Those not near a TV can watch online at opry.com., or listen in at wsmonline.com or by tuning their radio dials to WSM 650AM and SiriusXM Willie’s Roadhouse (Ch. 56).

Read more:
George Jones tributes: Brad Paisley, Jimmy Buffett, Alan Jackson, and more play covers — VIDEO
George Jones: The Essential Playlist — LISTEN
Goodbye, Possum: The Oak Ridge Boys’ Joe Bonsall remembers George Jones
Legendary country star George Jones is dead at 81

George Jones tributes: Brad Paisley, Jimmy Buffett, Alan Jackson, and more play covers -- VIDEO

Since the April 26 passing of George Jones, country music artists and fans have been in mourning. But as we all know, music heals, which is why set-lists included tributes to the Possum over the weekend. Here are some that have made their way to YouTube. Jones’ funeral will take place May 2, at The Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville, and be open to the public.

Brad Paisley, “Bartender’s Blues,” “The Race Is On,” “She Thinks I Still Care,” “This is Country Music” (his song, with new Jones-centric lyrics)

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Goodbye, Possum: The Oak Ridge Boys' Joe Bonsall remembers George Jones

To honor George Jones, EW asked the Oak Ridge Boys’ Joe Bonsall to recall his fondest memories of the country legend, who died today at the age of 81. They include the time Jones told Bonsall he should’ve just kicked his ass — and hearing “He Stopped Loving Her Today” before its release.

By: Joe Bonsall

As fate might have it, last night at a show in Missouri someone yelled from the audience, “How is George Jones doing?”

Well, we had no answer. We were well aware that George was in the hospital again and had been there since the middle of the month, but for some reason we thought he was doing all right but we did not know for sure. We all looked at each other on stage after the question in wonder… Each man’s face registered concern at NOT knowing the answer.

Then we arrived home this morning and heard the sad news that the Possum has gone home. How very sad. What an incredible and devastating loss for all who knew him, respected him, admired him, and loved him.

So many memories come to mind. A young Joey Bonsall once driving from Philadelphia to Youngstown, Ohio in a ’59 Ford all alone… to see George Jones and Tammy Wynette. He was a bit on the edge that night (being kind), and I remember being mad at him. As a young man who was in total love with Tammy, I perceived him to be a bit disrespectful of her onstage and I considered waiting for him at the stage door to tell him so… but I just drove all night back home.

I told him that story years later, and he told me I should have just kicked his ass and we both laughed.  READ FULL STORY

Missing George Jones -- and other late icons we never got to see live

The word “legend” gets thrown around a lot in music, but when you’re talking country great George Jones, it fits.

Jones, who died this morning at age 81 after being hospitalized April 18, was in the midst of his goodbye tour, and I was supposed to see him in June for the first time — a concert that had been postponed from last summer, when he canceled shows for health reasons.

Never having seen him live will remain one of my biggest regrets. While I console myself with some YouTube videos below, tell me who you wish you’d been able to see in concert before the opportunity was lost. READ FULL STORY

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