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Tag: Indie Rock (1-10 of 676)

DMA's give the Britpop revival a boost with 'Laced'

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It’s been 19 years since Oasis released (What’s the Story) Morning Glory?, so it’s about time for Britpop to have another day in the sun.

There’s already been a marked increase recently in bands sonically referencing Britain’s crunchy but unabashedly poppy response to the relatively dour American alt-rock movement, and a few, like Newtown, Australia’s DMA’s, who seem to consider it a primary musical touchstone. The handful of home-recorded songs they’ve released so far have not just the slurry, ragged lead vocals of classic Oasis, but that band’s buoyant sense of melody as well.

Their latest, “Laced,” combines that with some of The Verve’s stoned ambience and Britpop godfathers XTC’s fizzy bubblegum edge. “Laced” and “So We Know” be released as a single in November, available digitally via Mermaid Avenue in the U.S.

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Wild Cub blend heartachy hooks and hypnotic visuals in a new version of 'Colour'

Back in the spring, Nashville indie rockers Wild Cub released a video for their song “Colour” from last year’s Youth LP, a swoony ballad possessed of a nervy postpunk energy and a visual (created by Drew Bourdet and Dustin Lane) with pretty young people doing the low-key profound things that young people do, like drive around in cars and make out with each other. The band’s latest release is a “Colour” single, which includes not only the radio edit of the song but a radically different version recorded with Spoon drummer/producer Jim Eno and featuring singer-songwriter Jessie Baylin that slows things down, smooths them out, and lets it all breathe in a way that shows an entirely different side to the composition that’s softer and even a little heartbreaky. Similarly, the accompanying video presents the original material in a different way, editing outtakes from the first “Colour” visual into a dreamy, hypnotic collage.

The “Colour” single, which also includes a remix of the Youth song “Thunder Clatter” by Jensen Sportag, is out digitally now on Mom + Pop, with a limited edition 10″ vinyl version out Oct. 28. They’ll be heading out on tour with Fun. offshoot Bleachers starting later this month.

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Manchester Orchestra share a playlist of inspired cover songs

Atlanta’s Manchester Orchestra have followed up their 2014 album, Cope, which combined indie rock melodicism with hard rock heft, in a novel way. Their new LP, Hope, is a track-by-track reimagining of Cope as a much quieter and more subdued affair, replacing crunching guitars and pounding drums with delicate acoustic picking, soft horn and piano arrangements, and the marked influence of both rootsy Americana and intricately assembled chamber pop. It’s a daring concept, but the band’s managed to pull it off, creating an album that not only sheds a different light on Cope but may even be an improvement, at least to some listeners.

In keeping with Hope‘s theme of radical musical reinvention, MO has assembled a playlist of covers songs that offer a far different experience than the originals (plus a Paul Simon demo that shows how much Graceland‘s “Homeless” changed between inception and completion).

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Hear the Afghan Whigs demo of 'Debonair,' an exclusive premiere from 'Gentlemen at 21'

The Afghan Whigs’ Gentlemen, originally released in 1993, not only represents the band’s major-label debut, but it’s also the platonic ideal of the group’s sound. Over the course of 11 tracks, the Whigs melded the sultry slink of R&B with the jagged crunch of indie rock, all fueled by frontman Greg Dulli’s sly, savage take on relationships.

On October 27, Rhino will release Gentlemen at 21, a deluxe reissue of the album celebrating the fact that it has finally reached drinking age. In addition to the original remastered album, there are 17 bonus tracks that include a bunch of b-sides, live performances, and the original Gentlemen demos.  READ FULL STORY

Eaves's 'Timber' is sweet, slightly dark folk-pop

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Leeds, England-based singer-songwriter Eaves sounds remarkably mature for an artist who’s only in his early 20s. The three songs on his upcoming Old As the Grave EP forgo the ’90s-style fuzz and postmodern electronic sounds of most buzzy young acts, presenting his songs with bare-minimum arrangements that give his deft melodies and crystal-clear voice plenty of room to breathe. The songs recall low-key folkies from Nick Drake and Fairport Convention to Bon Iver, but Eaves’s emotive vocals and the hint of darkness that he adds to them—even on the lilting piano ballad “Timber”—make them feel bracingly original.

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Weaves have a hot new rock song with an NSFW title

Weaves has a slippery sonic identity that can change radically from song to song, turning on a dime from fuzzy electropop to a compellingly weird amalgamation of the B-52’s and UK postpunk to straightforward power pop. It might make for a confusing listen if the group didn’t have frontwoman Jasmyn Burke’s distinctive achey voice to pull it all together, as well as the chops to pull off seemingly whatever style they tackle.

On their latest single—whose title EW style prevents us from publishing in the headline, but which we can tell you here in the body of this post is actually “S–thole”—the Toronto four-piece sounds a little like The Pixies at their proto-grunge best covering a Burger Records stoner-pop song. The single comes out Oct. 20 through Buzz Records.

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Synths and psychedelia collide on Canopies' 'The Plunderers and the Pillagers'

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Milwaukee electro-psych-pop quintet Canopies have a lot of synthesizers and a lot of patience. Despite the buzzworthiness of their sound, which should resonate with fans of MGMT, the group eschewed the urge to rush into releasing its first album and instead went two solid years with a pile of vintage equipment patiently assembling their debut, Maximize Your Faith (out Dec. 9 on Forged Artifacts).

The payoff to their slow-moving approach is apparent on the intricately layered instrumentation on “The Plunderers and the Pillagers,” which you can spend multiple listens peeling apart to find the nifty little flourishes woven into the mix. Or you could just sit back and enjoy the song’s expansive hooks and crackling energy, which make it an excellent choice for starting off your weekend with a synth-heavy bang.

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Icelandic indie rockers Ourlives unveil 'Blurry Eyes'

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Over the past few years, Iceland has emerged as an unlikely indie rock hotbed. Sigur Rós remains the best known of Iceland’s bands, but there are a bunch coming up in their wake, including Reykjavik duo Ourlives. The pair consider themselves indebted to acts like Coldplay and Radiohead, but on their upcoming album Den of Lions (out Oct. 14 on Spartan Records and available for pre-order on iTunes and vinyl), they aim for something less ostentatiously grand but just as interesting, and on the track “Blurry Eyes,” they sound almost like a dreamier, less anxiety-ridden version of Interpol.

Member Jón Björn Árnason calls the track “a song we wrote about addiction. It’s about addiction being an easy escape from the everyday life—and about being afraid to face each day and the duties that come with it. The lyric ‘blue heaven’ is a reference to the way the summer is in Iceland, as it doesn’t stay dark very long—in fact, the sun is up most of the night.”

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Reviewing Thom Yorke's 'Tomorrow's Modern Boxes': A surprise delivery -- and a pretty great one

On Friday, Radiohead frontman and dance enthusiast Thom Yorke snuck up on the Internet and delivered another sonic sucker punch. Not only did he announce that he had completed a new solo album called Tomorrow’s Modern Boxes, but that said album was already available via BitTorrent.

For a nominal fee of $6, hardcore fans were entitled to download a bundle that included all eight of the album’s tracks plus the unnerving music video for the track “A Brain in a Bottle”: READ FULL STORY

Hear two new delicately chilled-out pop tunes from Icewater

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Icewater began as three guys playing around with self-penned country songs in a Brooklyn apartment, but after four years, the acquisition of a drummer and a bassist, and the tragic passing of member Grant Martin, the band has reinvented itself as purveyors of chiming, clean-toned indie pop built on a rootsy foundation with a glassy psychedelic sheen. Imagine Wilco if they’d abandoned their proggier tendencies and taken up residency as the house band for a very classy but chill drinking establishment, and you should be in the right neighborhood.

The group’s been splitting its time between performing its own material and serving as the backing band for Eleanor Friedberger. They have a followup to this year’s Collector’s Edition LP in the can but no solid plans yet for releasing it. While they plan their next move, they’re releasing a two-track EP, out Oct. 7, which they’ll celebrate with a release party at Williamsburg, Brooklyn’s Baby’s All Right on Oct. 15. You can hear it here right now.

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