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Tag: Indie Rock (1-10 of 696)

Hear indie-folk outfit Seagulls cover Big Star's 'Thirteen' -- exclusive

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Big Star’s “Thirteen” is one of the prettiest and most tender compositions in pop history. Rolling Stone put the version the band recorded for their ironically entitled 1972 LP #1 Album at No. 406 on their list of the best 500 songs ever, but if they were ranking them by their ability to evoke a uniquely sweet and nostalgic flavor of heartache, it would easily take the No. 1 spot.

Philly indie outfit Seagulls, who intriguingly combine folky textures and electronic sounds, tackled the song during the recording session in a secluded West Virginia cabin that produced their upcoming LP Great Pine, due out in February on Yellow K Records. Their version wisely sticks close to Big Star’s version, and like the original, it’ll get you right in the feels.

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Murder by Death shares triumphant psych jam 'Strange Eyes'

Over the course of a nearly 15-year career, the band Murder by Death has taken a leading role in a growing effort to unite indie rock with country and folk. But they’ve also released plenty of music that defies their reputation as just twangy roots rockers. On Feb. 3 they’ll release their seventh LP, Big Dark Love, featuring the song “Strange Eyes,” in which they tap into the same reserve of acid-fried energy that powers psych-rock bands like Spiritualized and the Black Angels, adding some intriguing drone to the mix before exploding the whole thing with some rousingly triumphant guitar heroics.

The band will hit the road at the end of the month with an itinerary that’ll include three nights at the Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colorado, better known as the hotel from The Shining.

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The Ting Tings' 'Wrong Club' gets an ironically club-worthy remix by Boix

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For their upcoming third LP Super Critical, British dance-pop duo The Ting Tings kept up their tradition of recording each of their albums in a different country and decamped to the island of Ibiza, the world’s unofficial capital of raving. “We were quite fascinated with how DJ’s construct their songs,” jet-lagged front woman Katie White explains by phone from her hotel room in Tokyo. “It’s quite different from how you’d write a typical pop song.”

“So we set off to Ibiza thinking we’d probably gonna be inspired by DJ culture and EDM and all of that,” she explains, “and we actually ended up making an album that sounded nothing like Ibiza. We’d go to the clubs, and they were really good, but we’d walk away and go, ‘Oh, could you imagine what it would be like to be in New York at CBGB and Studio 54 in the ’70s?’ We’d fantasize about all of these clubs that don’t exist. So we started to really look into it, and at the music that was played at those clubs.”

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Hear a new Lemuria track and read a comic about their insane Russian tour

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Buffalo trio Lemuria has been releasing pop-infused punk records and touring behind them for a decade now. In 2011, the band played a string of shows in Russia, and the experience was so insane (because, Russia) that they’ve decided to commemorate it with a comic book.

On Tuesday, they’ll release a seven-inch single that comes packaged with a comic that relates some of the crazy things that happened to them in Russia, including having a show swarmed by a mob of Nazis. Get a peek, along with an advance listen of the B-side “Courtesy Mercedes,” after the jump. They’ll be touring with Chicago emo revivalist Into It. Over It. through the end of December (but not in Russia).

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Sleater-Kinney shares snippets of two new songs

Back in October, Sleater-Kinney surprised fans with the big reveal that the career-spanning box set they’re about to release isn’t just a look back at their incredibly influential career but the first chapter in a new phase of their collaboration.

They broke the news with a new song, “Bury Our Friends,” and during an interview on NPR’s All Songs Considered yesterday they played snippets of two more recent recordings.

You can hear the interview here, and if you’re in a rush you can skip ahead to 19:19 to hear “Surface Envy” and to 32:39 for a bit of “No Cities to Love.”

Sunmonks take a desert trip in their new video

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Sunmonks’ Geoffrey CK and Alexandra Steele reside in Auburn, California, a small town better known for its role in the Gold Rush than for producing eccentric pop groups. Starting out out with an interest in art-bent rock bands and a loop pedal, the pair has developed a sound that combines lilting melodies, hypnotic rhythms, and bits of musical styles from all over the globe, and their recent In the Desert of Plenty is a worthy successor to similarly inclined groups like Talking Heads and Vampire Weekend.

For the title track’s video, Geoffrey CK writes in an email, “We had a lot of different plans, but at risk of being overly heavy-handed, we ended up deciding to film in a literal desert.” The visual that resulted finds the band striking poses and generating mystical vibes. “Any excuse to drive out to the middle of nowhere to perform rituals and ceremonies, play with fire, and watch the sunrise is a good one,” he notes.

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Terrace premieres 'Cote d'Azur' video

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Vancouver trio Terrace grew up in the heyday of dance music and synth disco—an era they revisit in their dreamy, danceable sound while somehow retaining a quality of timelessness. Terrace’s brand-new video for their August single, the characteristically infectious “Côte D’Azur,” embodies the band’s je ne sais quoi: It’s a sun-washed vision of the French Riviera circa the ’80s.

“As a child of the 80s, ‘Côte D’Azur’ is a tale of summer love and longing for the ultimate fantasy of life in the French Riviera,” explains frontman Simon Lock. (Fun fact: his other job is as a commercial airline pilot.) “A time and place where the sounds of Chic, Roxy Music, and Giorgio Moroder provided the soundtrack of carefree decadence,” he adds.

Especially present is the influence of Italian producer Giorgio Moroder, an early pioneer of synth disco and EDM, and Nile Rodgers, who has produced albums for David Bowie, Madonna, and Duran Duran. The imagery in the video, directed by Barcelona-based Marc Alcover, is sublime; the footage of crashing waves complements the song’s hypnotic hook, while the handheld shots of the young woman the video follows enhance the allure.

Below, watch the exclusive premiere of the video—and delight in the fact that”Côte D’Azur” is only the first in a planned trilogy of music videos from Terrace’s sophomore album, We Fall Together, dropping early next year.

Anthropomorphism runs wild in Ha the Unclear's 'Secret Lives of Furniture' video

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Everyone’s imagined at some point or another that the inanimate objects around them have some sort of sentience, an interior life and emotional landscape like people do, but that people are unable to connect with. Few, though, have followed that idea through to as bizarre a conclusion as Ha the Unclear frontman Michael Cathro has. In the latest single from the fascinatingly odd New Zealand indie pop band, he sings from the perspective of a coffee table with a perhaps-not-entirely-healthy fixation on the person whose living room it occupies. For the video the band came up with an ingenious low-budget conceit that examines the relationship between people and the furniture they own in an interesting way, as well as putting Cathro’s clever and creepy lyrics up front.

“‘Secret Lives of Furniture’ is about a coffee table who becomes infatuated with its owner and is left broken at the landfill after the owner passes away,” Cathro writes in an email. “We wanted to incorporate that anthropomorphism in the video. We spent a day walking around Mt. Eden putting up posters of missing furniture imagining that everyone’s furniture was running away because we hadn’t been treating them well enough. Maybe they had all gone underground to form a secret society and plan some kind of furniture revolt.”

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Black English taps Flaming Lips collaborator for 'Hold On' video

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L.A.’s Black English used to go by the name NO, which they changed due to it being massively confusing and un-Googleable (not to mention the fact that there’s another band called that) but gave it to their latest album, which was released at the beginning of the year. The latest single from NO is “Hold On,” and they’ve filmed a video for it with Natalie Wertzel and a gang of collaborators including Oliver Hibert, the psychedelic painter and sculptor who’s largely taken over visual identity duties for the Flaming Lips, including the cover art of their recent Sgt. Pepper’s tribute.

“The ‘Hold On’ video came about when I ran into a young lady, Natalie Wetzel, at an Echo Park cafe down my street,” writes Black English’s Bradley Carter in an email. “She was new to town and we started talking about how relationships can be so interesting in this time. You can be thousands of miles away from each other but still feel so connected, almost too much to a point that it can affect or intrude on everyone else around you if you aren’t careful.”

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The Paperhead shares what they've been listening to in the van

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The Paperhead is frequently grouped in with Nashville’s vigorous garage rock scene, but the band actually draws less from The Stones and The Seeds than it does from a period of the late ’60s and early ’70s where whimsical psychedelia and pastoral folk met up with rock’s push toward more sophisticated songwriting.

Their new Africa Avenue LP (out now on the buzzy Chicago label Trouble in Mind) is full of giddily tripped-out pop hooks and unexpected sharp turns that have made them one of the most talked-about rock bands of the moment. They just wrapped up their latest tour, and they’ve shared with EW a playlist of what they’ve been listening to in the van.

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