The Music Mix Music news, reviews, albums, concerts, and downloads

Tag: Indie Rock (91-100 of 632)

Take a look at Nirvana's first record contract with Sub Pop, worth a hefty $600

“Six hundred bucks well spent—not that we had it at the time.”

The official Tumblr account of Sub Pop Records just put up a copy of Nirvana’s first contract, along with that note — the contract that would yield the band’s first album, 1989′s Bleach.

There are some remarkable pieces of history embedded in this artifact: The fact that the band was signed as a four-piece (featuring soon-to-be-departed members Chad Channing and Jason Everman, the latter of whom did not play on Bleach), that they were originally only signed for two years (it was set to expire at the end of 1991, though Sub Pop made a deal with DGC about Nirvana prior to the release of Nevermind), and that the band’s first advance was for a guaranteed $600 (with jumps up to $12,000 and $24,000 in the option years).

Of course, the band became far bigger than anybody at Sub Pop could have predicted back in ’89: They went on to sell over 30 million worldwide copies of their second album Nevermind and changed the course of popular music for a few years in the early ’90s.

As noted yesterday, Nirvana’s In Utero is getting the 20th anniversary box set treatment next month.

Courtney Love on making new music, getting back to acting, and more: An EW Q&A

Courtney Love is currently on tour through the end of this month, ripping through sets featuring Hole songs that sound as fresh as they did two decades ago. And after laying relatively low for a while, she’s got a lot coming up: A new album, a book, and a whole lot of social media suggestions. On her way to the airport, Love called in to give us updates on everything happening in Loveland.

EW: What inspired this tour you’re on?
Courtney Love: I was supposed to have a single out right now. Someone promised me a unicorn and then another unicorn, and then none of the unicorns came. I’m really pretty experienced now, so when people promise me unicorns, I really want to buy them, but I’m also really quick to say, “OK, f— off if there’s no unicorn coming.” But this is a fun tour. We have a guy named Ginger who is a brilliant guitar player. He’s like a [Billy] Corgan kind of guy, in the sense that he’s very gifted and very very loud. I have two very loud guitar players, so I’m always afraid my vocals will get drowned out. I’m also going to L.A. for a few days. I’m trying out for a film and I’m trying out for an HBO show, and I have a meeting for a Showtime show.

So you’re getting back into acting?
I have a new agent for the first time in a long time, and people thought—and for a while this was true—that I wasn’t interested in acting. But now I am, and I’m pursuing it really aggressively. I might even have to move back to L.A. to pursue it. We’ll see. I mean, I’m not Liev Schreiber, and I’m not going to play MacBeth at the Public [Theater], you know?

Do you relish the idea of moving back to Los Angeles after living in New York? READ FULL STORY

MGMT's best song in ages, 'Your Life Is a Lie,' gets a great video -- WATCH

We all know MGMT have a fame-and-fortune complex: When F&F beckoned, they responded with the snidely-titled Congratulations, which our then-critic called an “odd little sonic onion … [that] studiously avoided any obvious pop hook.”

Their third album, which comes out September 17, is self-titled, so it could be about anything. “Alien Days,” a space-out from the album that was released as a Record Store Day cassingle (LOL), suggested we were in for more of the same. But their bracing new single, “Your Life Is a Lie,” hints at an MGMT under new management.

Two minutes long and rather rude, “Your Life Is a Lie” is more or less the sound of a band pulling its head out of its ass. It’s got a gnarly, looping garage-rock drive, and more niceties than you’d expect from such a quickie: cowbell, an almost comically buzzy high-end, some kind of something solo that you could (yes) call spacey, and a magnificent hook.

READ FULL STORY

Hear Kathleen Hanna's new Julie Ruin song 'Ha Ha Ha' -- EXCLUSIVE

Kathleen-Hanna.jpg

After laying low for serious bummer reasons for several years, riot grrrl icon Kathleen Hanna is back. The Bikini Kill and Le Tigre veteran’s new project the Julie Ruin is set to release their debut album Run Fast on Sept. 3, and the band recently put out a great video for the lead single “Oh Come On.”

Now they’re releasing another new song from the album, the spiky, hyperactive “Ha Ha Ha,” which you can hear it exclusively here:

READ FULL STORY

Mumford & Sons get Jason Sudeikis, Jason Bateman and more to spoof them in 'Hopeless Wanderer' video -- WATCH

Mumford & Sons have got a sense of humor after all … is what you’re supposed to think after watching the video for “Hopeless Wanderer.”

The professional white funnymen Jason Sudeikis, Jason Bateman, Ed Helms and Wil Forte stand in for the band, wearing suspenders and fake beards, hauling their instruments down a dusty lane, playing in a row boat, crying, tasting each other’s tears, and eventually smashing their instruments and at least one of the filament bulbs lighting the barn they’re in.

Because you can’t make a parody these days without taking it over the top, Sudeikis and Forte also share an open-mouthed kiss.

I was more tickled by the smoke coming off Bateman’s hands during his banjo solo. Although the kiss seems less rote when you think of it as underlining the song’s vague references to a young man’s romantic confusion (key line: “I wrestled long with my youth,” snicker).

READ FULL STORY

Lollapalooza 2013 Day 2: Mumford & Sons set the tone, Kendrick Lamar ascends, and Postal Service run a victory lap

Most of the time, Lollapalooza’s scheduling seems left to the whims of fate, the daily lineup strung together seemingly at random so that indie poppers bump up against metal acts and soul throwbacks open for folky singer-songwriters. It makes for some wildly jarring juxtapositions, with occasional stumbles into transcendence.

Saturday was different, at least at the south end of Chicago’s Grant Park. The ascendance of headliners Mumford & Sons rippled all the way into the afternoon, where banjo-friendly arrangements and country twang informed the bulk of the performances: Court Yard Hounds brought their pop-friendly version of crossover bluegrass, Eric Church stomped through a set of outlaw Southern rock, and twee Irish strummers Little Green Cars crafted colorful tapestries out of all manner of acoustic thread. (The National, sandwiched in between Church and semi-main eventers the Lumineers, must have been deeply confused by all the headband-wearing sunflower girls hanging around, as they’re used to playing for broodier types. Still, they did dedicate “England” to Mumford & Sons.)

It all led up to a triumphant turn by Mumford & Sons, who drew a massive throng of folk-hungry youth to sing along with Marcus Mumford’s every bellow and wail. There wasn’t a single tune across Mumford’s nearly two-hour set that wasn’t greeted as a massive hit, though the gathering masses reserved extra glee for “Little Lion Man,” “I Will Wait,” and “Lover of the Light.”

Mumford & Sons are not showmen, and their performance was free of both bells and whistles, but their songs clearly resonate across a wide spectrum, and they’re savvy enough to get out of the way of their trainload of sing-alongs.

READ FULL STORY

Lollapalooza 2013 Day 1: The Killers and New Order bridge the gap, Nine Inch Nails challenges, Imagine Dragons blow up, and Icona Pop make it rain

Imagine-Dragons

In the video for New Order’s “Crystal”—which opened the veteran Manchester dance-rockers’ twilight set on the first day of Lollapalooza—there is a fake band called the Killers that inspired the name of the real band known as the Killers, who headlined the southernmost stage in Chicago’s Grant Park on Friday night. Those who spent the evening parked in front of that stage were treated to four hours of blissful, rhythmic, guitar-based pop that tapped into Lollapalooza’s spirit of eclecticism and brotherhood.

Even in their first-album youth, the Killers have always played the role of a big rock band—they seem custom-built for festival headlining slots. They did not disappoint; their 90-minute Friday finale was a gimmick-free charge through their impressive, hook-filled back catalog.Frontman Brandon Flowers worked the tens of thousands in front of him like a Vegas lounge revue, strutting and pounding through neutron bombs like “Mr. Brightside” and “Somebody Told Me,” and in a charming bit of hero worship that brought the evening back around for a resolution, he welcomed New Order frontman Bernard Sumner to join the Killers for a cover of Joy Division’s “Shadowplay,” which they turned into a spry, jittery singalong.

In fact, the transformation of Joy Division songs might have been the highlight of Friday’s festivities. New Order finished their performance with three nods to the band they used to be, ripping through “Atmosphere,” “Transmission,” and “Love Will Tear Us Apart” as a tribute to late JD frontman Ian Curtis. In a remarkable bit of alchemy, Sumner (with a healthy assist from a game audience) turned “Love Will Tear Us Apart,” a downer of a song written by a guy who hanged himself, into a (pardon the pun) joyous anthem. Maybe that’s just the power of New Order, who ripped through a hit-filled set of effervescent synth-powered janglers like the dreamy “The Perfect Kiss” and a thudding “Blue Monday.” READ FULL STORY

Lollapalooza 2013 Day 0: Queens of the Stone Age start the weekend early

The official start of Lollapalooza 2013 was set for 11:30 AM on Friday, when the School of Rock tykes unleash the weekend’s first notes on the Kidzapalooza stage. And though his band wasn’t set to kick off their Lolla performance until Friday evening, Queens of the Stone Age frontman Josh Homme had already started the party.

“I’m way high right now,” Homme told the sweaty crowd at the Metro on Thursday night during a raucous pre-Lollapalooza show. “Way higher than I look.”

He had clearly figured out the correct chemical cocktail for himself, as Homme and his gang of desert-rock ruffians plowed through nearly two hours of blistering riffs and druggy singalongs. READ FULL STORY

Watch the National perform 'This Is the Last Time' on 'The Artists Den' -- EXCLUSIVE

the-national-Artists-Den.jpg

The public-television concert series Live From the Artists Den is currently in its home stretch, but there are still a couple of great shows left. The next one, airing this Thursday, is going to feature the National — and you can watch a preview of it exclusively here.

The Brooklyn-via-Cincinnati band bring their characteristically dark and brooding vibe to the clip while performing their song “This Is the Last Time,” taken from their recently released sixth album Trouble Will Find Me.

Take a look at the clip below:

READ FULL STORY

Vampire Weekend bangs out carefree cover of Robin Thicke's 'Blurred Lines': Listen here

Vampire-Weekend-Review.jpg

Looks like Robin Thicke and the indie world have a little back-and-forth brewing.

Recently, you may recall, the “Blurred Lines” singer took on the Swedish electro-pop duo Icona Pop by Thicke-ifying their hot single “I Love It.” Before that, Queens of the Stone Age took their own crack at “Blurred Lines” while performing for the BBC.

And now the latest volley comes from Vampire Weekend, who offer what’s probably the most fun, unbuttoned cover of Thicke’s No 1 hit. Check it out below:

READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Music

Advertisement

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP