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Tag: Indie Rock (21-30 of 678)

Hear the anthemic post-punk of Wampire's 'The Amazing Heart Attack'

Wampire’s Bazaar is one of the more ambitious rock records of the year. Over the course of just nine songs the Portland quintet (formerly a duo comprised of primary songwriters Rocky Tinder and Eric Phipps) touches on at least a dozen of rock history’s more interesting stylistic movements, including glam, psych, bubblegum, New Wave, and whatever you want to call the enthusiastically quirky prog-pop of ’70s-era groups like Sparks. The opening track “The Amazing Heart Attack” alone pulls together pounding rockabilly drums, steely postpunk guitars, and the headbanging anthemic quality of classic Pixies, setting a high bar that they spend the rest of the album clearing with apparent ease.

Bazaar is out Oct. 7. You can pre-order here.

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Zulu Pearls hang with Swedish car freaks in their 'Lightweight' video

When some people think about Sweden and automobiles, they think of clean-cut blondes driving Volvos. But since the dawn of hot-rod culture in the U.S., there’s been a subculture in Sweden that’s been bound together by their mutual worship of tail-finned American steel, cheap beer, and rock ‘n’ roll. Known as “raggare,” they throw a hefty, fuel-inefficient monkey wrench in the popular preconception of Swedes as the neatest and most polite people in the world, and they seem like they have a blast doing it.

For the video for their new single “Lightweight,” Berlin-based rock group Zulu Pearls’ creative mastermind Zach Van Hoozer traveled to Sweden to hang out with the raggare gang Moonshine Cruisers and caught the experience on film. The result creates an interesting juxtaposition of sugary retro-rock sounds and pastoral images of grizzled hot rodders shotgunning beers.

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The indefatigable Bob Mould releases 'The War' video

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If someone could figure out how to distill whatever it is that keeps Bob Mould at the top of his game over 30 years into his career and turn it into an energy drink, that person could easily make billions. At age 53, while all of his contemporaries from the early ’80s American underground rock scene have either called it quits or slid comfortably into nostalgia-fueled reunion tours, Mould continues to bash out loud, tuneful guitar jams that are just as good as anything he’s ever done, still puts on a killer show, and, if the video for his new single “The War” is any indication, still at least occasionally carries his own gear.

Shot by Dave Markey, director of the grunge-era-defining documentary 1991: The Year Punk Broke, the clip follows Mould and his band (comedian/Superchunk drummer Jon Wurster and indie-rock journeyman Jason Narducy) through a gig night from loading up the van to loading out of the club, bookended with a pair of more stylized scenes.

Stick around until the end for the cameo by another indie-rock notable who happens to be wearing a very sweet Robocop patch on his jean jacket. (And when you’re done with that, go watch Mould and the rest of his first band Hüsker Dü being interviewed by Joan Rivers in 1987.)

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Record shopping with Interpol frontman Paul Banks

You might expect the leader of aughties postpunk overlords Interpol — who will release their first album in four years, El Pintor, on Sept. 9 — to be dour and aloof, or at least shrink away from bright sunlight. But the guy who strolls into Brooklyn’s Rough Trade Records on a sweltering August afternoon is friendly and voluble (and has a pretty brutal backspin, it turns out, on the store’s Ping-Pong table).

Over piles of vinyl and iced Americanos, Paul Banks, 36, talked with EW about the song that still gives him chills, his early obsessions with Nirvana and N.W.A, and the homemade mixtape that really freaked out his mom.

Sonic Youth,
Daydream Nation (1988)

“The first band that made me want to make music was Nirvana. So I was very aware of anything Nirvana-
affiliated, and I was watching an episode of 120 Minutes with them that Thurston Moore was hosting, and I remember thinking, ‘Who the f— is this dude that Nirvana keeps hanging out with? What’s the deal here?’ I
was very mindful of ‘Nirvana took this band out on tour, they must be someone I should know about.’

So I got [1990’s] Goo, which at that age didn’t really speak to me. But when I got to college, I got EVOL and Daydream Nation, which just… The textures and the guitar tones and the drive—I mean, some of the most beautiful guitar work of any rock songs ever is on this record. Insofar as one wants to emulate things as a musician, those were the things I wanted to emulate.” READ FULL STORY

Watch Una Lux's 'Simon' video, where Caravaggio meets Portishead

NYC-based four-piece Una Lux are a more aesthetically ambitious group than the average indie band, as likely to throw around references to Baroque painters and avant-garde film directors as they are to Pink Floyd and Portishead. The group’s guitarist Matteo Liberatore, who directed the video for their new single “Simon,” says that the clip “is filled with homage. We tried to reference Vittorio Storaro’s use of lighting in ‘The Last Emperor,’ some of the poses in Caravaggio portraits, and the parapsychology of David Lynch’s films, and then we cut it like French New Wave.” The finished product’s studied arrangements of bodies and light are both formal and faintly surreal, making it a fitting match for a song that balances sequenced electronic sounds with singer Kelso Norris’ sensuous vocals.

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TV on the Radio release guitar-driven single 'Happy Idiot'

After a decade-plus of being called an indie rock band without ever really sounding like one, avant-rockers TV on the Radio have released “Happy Idiot,” a track that emphasizes clean-toned guitar and accessible pop hooks over the atmosphere and electronic textures the rest of their discography’s been built on. The latest single from their upcoming album Seeds is as lyrically direct as it is musically, with frontman Tunde Adebimpe musing on non-thinking as a strategy for coping with emotional pain, sort of a less substance-centric relative of Sia’s “Chandelier” and Tove Lo’s “Habits (Stay High).” Seeds drops Nov. 18, and the band will be touring beforehand starting in mid-October.

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Hear HAERTS' transcendent new single 'Giving Up' (and watch the lyric video)

Haerts

New York City electropop quartet HAERTS went from utter obscurity to an extraordinary amount of attention in a very short time after releasing their first single back in 2012. Their forthcoming self-titled debut album, which drops Oct. 28, has turned out to be one of the most hotly anticipated releases of the year, and the lead single, “Giving Up,” proves it’s worth believing the hype: a propulsive stroboscopic synthesizer provides a launch pad for delicately arranged layers of chiming guitars, airy synths, and a vocal melody delivered by vocalist Nini Fabi that builds to a sublime climax, delivering the gravity-defying sensation of a perfectly crafted pop tune.

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Hear High Ends' eccentric 'Cappuccino,' a song about coffee

Jeffrey Innes is best known as frontman for the quirky Canadian indie rock outfit Yukon Blonde, which, typical of a band of its stature (an underground act in America but capable of charting in Canada), spends a lot of time on the road. During an atypical period with nothing YB-related to do, Innes launched a solo project that he calls High Ends.

On Oct. 7, he’ll release High Ends’ 10-song self-titled debut album on Dine Alone Records. One of the tracks is “Cappuccino,” a synth-heavy tribute to caffeinated beverages that recalls idiosyncratic pop acts like Pulp and Sparks.

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Watch a moody video for Trentemoller's 'Come Undone' remix

Anders Trentemøller is a Danish electronic musician who’s known for blending cutting-edge electronic production with dark and moody post-punk, resulting in tracks that can make a grown-up goth kid weak in the knees. For his last album, Lost, he took a more indie-friendly approach, collaborating with members of Lower Dens, Low, and the Raveonettes. On Sept. 1, he’ll release a set of remixes of Lost songs, including his own reworking of “Come Undone” featuring vocals by Kazu Makino of Blonde Redhead. The accompanying video, by director Andreas Emenius, pairs the track’s shimmering electro-funk with greyscale footage of a diver in slow motion, creating a moody, nearly abstract juxtaposition that the old Factory Records creative team would have been proud of.

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Emo revivalists Modern Baseball hit the road for 'Pothole' video

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After a solid decade as the go-to soundtrack for disaffected youth, emo has pretty much suffocated itself beneath a mountain of asymmetrical haircuts, metalcore breakdowns, and barely sublimated misogyny, and few people are in mourning over it. However, there’s a growing wave of young musicians who are throwing out the subgenre’s recent history and returning to the core values that defined it in the ’90s (before it was absorbed by Hot Topic), fusing punk’s energy and DIY ethos with the swooning romanticism of a teenage Smiths fan and the delicate melodies of a ’70s singer-songwriter.

Philly’s Modern Baseball is at the leading edge of this movement, and may be the most accessible to pop fans who don’t know or don’t care that there’s even an emo revival happening. Their latest single, “Pothole,” foregoes the pop-punk tendencies that define much of their material in favor of lightly fingerpicked acoustic guitar and nakedly raw vocals, to subtly powerful effect. The video, made largely out of footage filmed on one of their tours, highlights the energy that the band and their community of fans produce together at their shows, as well as the monotony of life on the road.

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