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Tag: Indie Rock (21-30 of 692)

Eaves's 'Timber' is sweet, slightly dark folk-pop

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Leeds, England-based singer-songwriter Eaves sounds remarkably mature for an artist who’s only in his early 20s. The three songs on his upcoming Old As the Grave EP forgo the ’90s-style fuzz and postmodern electronic sounds of most buzzy young acts, presenting his songs with bare-minimum arrangements that give his deft melodies and crystal-clear voice plenty of room to breathe. The songs recall low-key folkies from Nick Drake and Fairport Convention to Bon Iver, but Eaves’s emotive vocals and the hint of darkness that he adds to them—even on the lilting piano ballad “Timber”—make them feel bracingly original.

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Weaves have a hot new rock song with an NSFW title

Weaves has a slippery sonic identity that can change radically from song to song, turning on a dime from fuzzy electropop to a compellingly weird amalgamation of the B-52′s and UK postpunk to straightforward power pop. It might make for a confusing listen if the group didn’t have frontwoman Jasmyn Burke’s distinctive achey voice to pull it all together, as well as the chops to pull off seemingly whatever style they tackle.

On their latest single—whose title EW style prevents us from publishing in the headline, but which we can tell you here in the body of this post is actually “S–thole”—the Toronto four-piece sounds a little like The Pixies at their proto-grunge best covering a Burger Records stoner-pop song. The single comes out Oct. 20 through Buzz Records.

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Synths and psychedelia collide on Canopies' 'The Plunderers and the Pillagers'

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Milwaukee electro-psych-pop quintet Canopies have a lot of synthesizers and a lot of patience. Despite the buzzworthiness of their sound, which should resonate with fans of MGMT, the group eschewed the urge to rush into releasing its first album and instead went two solid years with a pile of vintage equipment patiently assembling their debut, Maximize Your Faith (out Dec. 9 on Forged Artifacts).

The payoff to their slow-moving approach is apparent on the intricately layered instrumentation on “The Plunderers and the Pillagers,” which you can spend multiple listens peeling apart to find the nifty little flourishes woven into the mix. Or you could just sit back and enjoy the song’s expansive hooks and crackling energy, which make it an excellent choice for starting off your weekend with a synth-heavy bang.

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Icelandic indie rockers Ourlives unveil 'Blurry Eyes'

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Over the past few years, Iceland has emerged as an unlikely indie rock hotbed. Sigur Rós remains the best known of Iceland’s bands, but there are a bunch coming up in their wake, including Reykjavik duo Ourlives. The pair consider themselves indebted to acts like Coldplay and Radiohead, but on their upcoming album Den of Lions (out Oct. 14 on Spartan Records and available for pre-order on iTunes and vinyl), they aim for something less ostentatiously grand but just as interesting, and on the track “Blurry Eyes,” they sound almost like a dreamier, less anxiety-ridden version of Interpol.

Member Jón Björn Árnason calls the track “a song we wrote about addiction. It’s about addiction being an easy escape from the everyday life—and about being afraid to face each day and the duties that come with it. The lyric ‘blue heaven’ is a reference to the way the summer is in Iceland, as it doesn’t stay dark very long—in fact, the sun is up most of the night.”

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Reviewing Thom Yorke's 'Tomorrow's Modern Boxes': A surprise delivery -- and a pretty great one

On Friday, Radiohead frontman and dance enthusiast Thom Yorke snuck up on the Internet and delivered another sonic sucker punch. Not only did he announce that he had completed a new solo album called Tomorrow’s Modern Boxes, but that said album was already available via BitTorrent.

For a nominal fee of $6, hardcore fans were entitled to download a bundle that included all eight of the album’s tracks plus the unnerving music video for the track “A Brain in a Bottle”: READ FULL STORY

Hear two new delicately chilled-out pop tunes from Icewater

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Icewater began as three guys playing around with self-penned country songs in a Brooklyn apartment, but after four years, the acquisition of a drummer and a bassist, and the tragic passing of member Grant Martin, the band has reinvented itself as purveyors of chiming, clean-toned indie pop built on a rootsy foundation with a glassy psychedelic sheen. Imagine Wilco if they’d abandoned their proggier tendencies and taken up residency as the house band for a very classy but chill drinking establishment, and you should be in the right neighborhood.

The group’s been splitting its time between performing its own material and serving as the backing band for Eleanor Friedberger. They have a followup to this year’s Collector’s Edition LP in the can but no solid plans yet for releasing it. While they plan their next move, they’re releasing a two-track EP, out Oct. 7, which they’ll celebrate with a release party at Williamsburg, Brooklyn’s Baby’s All Right on Oct. 15. You can hear it here right now.

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Purling Hiss conjure weird, gritty VHS vibes with a playlist

Singer-songwriter Mike Polizze occupies the weird zone where experimental art music and eccentric rock ‘n’ roll overlap: an odd but fruitful territory that’s been home to generations of Weird Rock heroes from Frank Zappa to Ariel Pink. Recently Polizze’s expanded his project Purling Hiss from a solo endeavor to a trio, upping the music’s pop quotient in the process, and in the process created his most accessible album. Weirdon, released today on Drag City, delivers classic rock tunefulness enveloped in a haze of freaky vibes that feels a bit like the group’s label mate Ty Segall but just a touch more tweaked out.

To celebrate Weirdon‘s release, Polizze compiled an exclusive playlist for EW that he says has “a gritty lo fi/VHS aesthetic.” If you like your rock music weird and obscure, you’re in luck.

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Hear a 'bountiful autumn' playlist from The Drums

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EW recently talked to Brooklyn indie heroes The Drums about their new album, Encyclopedia, and you can read the jumbo-sized Q&A with founders Jonny Pierce and Jacob Graham here. We also asked the pair for a playlist, and they gave us 10 tracks covering an impressive range of sounds and styles, from ambient goth to jittery postpunk funk to the Disney Robin Hood soundtrack.

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Indie pop goes digital on Cassorla's 'The Right Way'

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Every so often, a session musician will strike out from the backline to lead a group of his own. Much of the time, the resulting music is technically impressive but less than compelling—more or less underlining why he was playing backup rather than fronting a band in the first place.

But Ben Cassorla, who’s toured with bands like Washed Out and Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeroes (and, interestingly, Slick Rick), has proven himself to be an exception to the rule with his group, Cassorla. Back in the spring, he released an EP called Amigosnamed for the group of buddies, including Aubrey Plaza and members of the Magnetic Zeroes and Blitzen Trapper, who played on it—that emphasized his nifty pop songwriting chops over any flashy guitar skills he possesses.

The band’s about to head out for a fall tour with Blitzen Trapper. In preparation, he’s recorded a new single. Co-produced by Mighty Mike, who’s previously worked with Carly Rae Jepsen and Kelly Clarkson, “The Right Way” expands Cassorla’s sonic pallette by combining his signature punchy, riffy rhythm guitar playing with glassy keyboard flourishes and trap music’s flickering hi-hats, resulting in an odd but very interesting hybrid of indie rock and digital pop.

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Nude Beach share a playlist of their inspirations, and it's kind of like a collage

Brooklyn trio Nude Beach have a rare talent for borrowing sounds and ideas from various high points in rock history without coming off like copycats. Part of the reason is that they tend to collage bits from different styles and periods within one single song  part of it’s the quality of material that they’re drawing from, and part of it’s just a gift for writing undeniable hooks. While they’re getting ready for the release of their third LP 77 and an accompanying fall tour, the band took a break to make EW a playlist of songs that inspired the album. Covering everything from modern jangle revivalists to classic country to psychedelic folk, it’s proof that when it comes to making records, the band’s working with top-shelf ingredients.

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