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Tag: Indie Rock (51-60 of 680)

Q&A: Broods talk about their breakout single 'Mother & Father'

Broods are a brother and sister—Georgia and Caleb Nott—based out of Auckland, New Zealand. Geographically inclined pop listeners will note that this is where zeitgeist-dominating teen pop phenomenon Lorde also lives, and the two acts have more in common than just a hometown–Broods’ upcoming album, Evergreen, was produced by Joel Little, who also helmed Pure Heroine, and they share a common goal of uniting radio-friendly pop hooks and the cool-toned minimalist aesthetic that’s been dominating hip-hop during the Drake era.

Recently they released the first single from Evergreen, “Mother & Father,” and with its sweeping hook and up-to-the-minute production it’s already looking like it has a good chance of continuing the Kiwi takeover of the American pop charts. (Their upcoming tour with Sam Smith should help as well.) EW got on the phone with Georgia Nott to discuss it.

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White Arrows get electro-psychedelic with 'We Can't Ever Die'

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Los Angeles quintet White Arrows are indie rockers with big pop ambitions and a whole bunch of synthesizers. This combination has earned them spots on tours with taste-making bands like Cults and White Denim and slots at big festivals like Coachella and Sasquatch. After several years of touring behind their debut album, Dry Land Is Not A Myth, they’ve finally followed it up with In Bardo, out Sept. 16 on Votiv. On the lead single, “We Can’t Ever Die,” funky, disco-inflected verses segue smoothly into arena-worthy hooks that sound like a modern, not-annoying reincarnation of U2, with the whole thing decorated with burbling 8-bit-style synths. They’re on tour with the Neighbourhood and Danny Brown through the end of the month.

Video: Heaven's Jail premieres 'Suicide'

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Francesco Ferorelli grew up on rap and heavy metal, but as the primary songwriter for the group Heaven’s Jail he makes folk rock with a traditionalist bent and an attitude that recalls sardonic ’70s singer-songwriters like Kris Kristofferson and Loudon Wainwright III. The group’s latest, Ace Called Zero (out Aug. 26 on Heart Break Beat), was recorded last fall in Connecticut, with Matthew Houck (a.k.a. Phosphorescent) producing and Ben Greenberg of the Men engineering, making it kind of a super-session of Brooklyn roots rockers.

The first video from the album is for its second single, “Suicide.” It was directed by Curtis Wayne Millard, who’s who’s worked with The Head and The Heart, and its chilly visuals pair well with the song’s bare-bones arrangement. Ferorelli says, “This video was born in a moment of inspiration. We drove up to the woods to shoot the album cover and halfway through Curtis said ‘I think we might have a music video too,’ so he grabbed the Super 8 and just started filming. The weather was on our side providing thick rolling mist and drizzling rain, a couple feet of snow still covered the ground and night was approaching quickly. In several short enigmatic scenes he harnessed the fleeting spirit of the song and created an elegant visual companion.”

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Video: EULA goes retro for dance-punky 'Orderly'

The art-punk band EULA got its start in New Haven, Connecticut, a few years ago as a home recording project for frontwoman Alyse Lamb. A handful of records, several tours, and one move to Brooklyn later, the group has solidified a sharp-edged, frenetic sound that ties together postpunk, No Wave, and Riot Grrrl revivalism, producing something that could work equally well as the soundtrack for a riot or a dance party.

Last month, they released a new single recorded with Martin Bisi, who manned the boards for seminal albums by alt-rock icons like Sonic Youth and the Swans. Now the track, “Orderly,” is getting its own video that mashes up images of Lamb and some old-timey dancing ladies to kaleidoscopically psychedelic effect.

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Blood Orange releases wonderfully sad remix of Sia's 'Chandelier'

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Dev Hynes, better known as avant-R&B genius Blood Orange, has been lying low since suffering a catastrophic apartment fire back in the winter. But he’s been starting to regain some of the momentum that last November’s Cupid Deluxe album had begun to generate. He’s been getting back to releasing his series of consistently entertaining videos for Cupid Deluxe tracks.

Now, he’s released a radically deconstructed remix of Sia’s summer jam “Chandelier” that strips the song of its triumphal arena rock swagger and, well, pretty much everything else, which he’s replaced with his own vocals, a twitchy drum part, and a tasteful thumb piano part. In the process he’s remade one of the most inspirational get-pumped anthems of the year into an anxiety-ridden slow jam, stripping Sia’s chorus from its surroundings to let it hang almost unadorned in a way that transmutes its YOLO-ness into something starkly desperate. It does the exact opposite of the original, but it’s just as compelling.

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Haim teams up with A$AP Ferg on 'My Song 5' remix

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“My Song 5″ is one of the more surprising moments on Haim’s breakout album Days Are Gone, interrupting a collection of clean-lined songs with an eccentrically gangly mishmash of angular melody, hard-rock drums, and a blatting, cartoony parody of a dubstep bass synth. The trio has doubled down on the song’s weirdness by releasing a new version with a verse from rapper A$AP Ferg, of “Shabba” fame.

Ferg’s verse is way raunchier than the original lyrics, but they continue the theme of confusion and garbled communication between romantic partners, and his raps work well with the song’s big-ass drums. Haim and Ferg are both coming off of highly successful records, and are well positioned to doing whatever they want next. They should consider messing with people’s heads and making a whole album together.

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We Were Promised Jetpacks find 'Safety in Numbers'

Scottish quintet We Were Promised Jetpacks have spent years refining a sound that’s melodic but muscular. In the process, they’ve made some fairly big waves in the indie rock world. This fall, they’ll be releasing their third LP, Unravelling, on FatCat Records—and it has the potential to make the band some fans in a more mainstream setting.

The track “Safety in Numbers” brings together arena-ready drums, widescreen guitars, and a booming piano part in a way that should make fans of U2 and Coldplay–not to mention the epically bummed-out Scottish indie bands whose legacy the Jetpacks are working in–quite happy.

Check out our exclusive track premiere here:

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'Weird Al' Yankovic: The Stories Behind The Songs

For 35 years, “Weird Al” Yankovic has been music’s most reliable satirist, sending up the biggest pop hits and the most iconic artists for the sake of belly laughs. He’s about to release a brand new album called Mandatory Fun on July 15, so to prepare for a fresh batch of tunes we caught up with Yankovic to get the stories behind hits both big and small.  READ FULL STORY

Beck: On the scene at New York's Hammerstein Ballroom

A few months back, I had the distinct pleasure of receiving a phone call from Beck. The connection wasn’t great, though I chalked that up to the fact that he was calling me from a parallel universe—one that was not wholly unlike the one I exist in, but both slightly more contemplative and way more funky.

We discussed the artists, albums, and songs that have informed his life, and more than once he brought up British death metal band Carcass (whose Surgical Steel was one of my favorite albums of 2013). He seemed mostly charmed by their insane-sounding song titles (“Cadaveric Incubator of Endoparasites” was a favorite), but based on Beck’s show at New York’s Hammerstein Ballroom on Monday night, he also digs Carcass because, when given the chance, he likes to shred. READ FULL STORY

Hear electropop duo Vow's ethereal new single 'Planks' -- Exclusive

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Vow is an L.A.-based duo, consisting of multi-instrumentalist Andrew Thomas and vocalist Julia Blake, who are giving a contemporary update to the gothy ambience and gauzy textures of ’80s and ’90s dream-pop (which is currently in the midst of a fairly serious comeback). On August 12, they’ll release their second EP, Make Me Yours, on the buzzy Native Sound label, the follow-up to last summer’s Make Me Young. The lead single, “Planks,” boasts a propulsive electro foundation topped with reverb-drenched piano and washes of ambient guitar noise, as well as a swoony vocal performance by Blake that should appeal to fans of the Cocteau Twins and Lana Del Rey.

Blake says of the track, “Andrew approached me with the instrumental for this song when I was learning I was in love with someone who was addicted to unnecessary suffering. ‘Planks’ is about caring for someone when they are at their lowest and wanting all their pain to go away, but in the end, love just sometimes isn’t enough.”

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