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Tag: Indie Rock (51-60 of 600)

Watch Arcade Fire's 'Here Comes The Night Time' concert special

In case you were lulled to sleep by the weekend’s tepid Saturday Night Live premiere and missed musical guest Arcade Fire’s neon-colored concert special that aired right after the SNL credits rolled, you’re in luck: The entirety of the 22-minute affair, which features a bunch of new tracks from the band’s forthcoming album Reflektor, is now online.

Produced in association with the Creators Project and directed by Roman Coppola, Here Comes The Night Time features Arcade Fire frontman Win Butler jacking both Wayne Coyne and the ’97 version of Marilyn Manson. There’s also James Franco auditioning for a role in the Bill & Ted remake, Michael Cera endorsing Shakira en Espanol (and then later lecturing about the coolness of rooks on a chess board), Bill Hader and Zach Galifianakis in space, and a lot of those suits that Mike Mills wore in the “What’s the Frequency, Kenneth?” video.

There will probably be some sort of Bingo board or drinking game surrounding this thing soon, so go ahead and get familiar below:

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EW Interview: Vampire Weekend talk about their current tour, 'Breaking Bad,' and serenading One Direction

Vampire weekend have been touring nearly nonstop since their third album, Modern Vampires of the City, bowed at No. 1 in May. During their brief hometown stopover in New York City last week, we grabbed frontman Ezra Koenig and drummer Chris Tomson to catch up and toast their absent comrades at East Village bar Scratchers. (Bassist Chris Baio now lives in London, and guitarist/keyboardist Rostam Batmanglij was visiting family.)

Read on as we talk DVDs, babies, and Steve Buscemi with Koenig and Tomson. And maybe get them a little bit drunk.

EW: You guys have played every festival from Coachella to Glastonbury this year, and now you’ve got dates through October, including a slot at Austin City Limits next month. That’s a lot of time on the tour bus — how do you pass the time?

EZRA KOENIG [sipping Patron]: I like to read, watch TV.

CHRIS TOMSON [drinking a pale ale]: There’s a real big movement within the band to read books on electronic devices. There’s been a real uptick in that lately. And in the past, we’ve done a lot of serial television shows. Either very occasionally collectively, but mainly on our own. Someone will go down into an Entourage hole or something like that.

EK: We do like the kind of lesser Owen Wilson movies. And there was a time when I was watching the first few seasons of Martin. I usually watch that before the show, and then later maybe watch some Sopranos or something.

CT: Actually, this next tour, when TV season starts up again, we’ll probably definitely going to set the bus DVR to Key and Peele. That’s coming back strong. We also like the show Nathan For You. Dude’s Canadian.

It must be hard to keep up with your favorite shows on tour. 

CT: Well, we’re going to be in L.A. on the day that the last Breaking Bad airs. And apparently — I don’t know anything about this, [bassist Chris] Baio told us about it — but at Hollywood Forever Cemetery there’s going to be a party where the cast is going to be there. They’re going to show the first episode and then the last one, with maybe a Q&A thing. So I think we’re all trying to hustle up and catch up so we can be ready if we can get into that thing. READ FULL STORY

Singer-songwriter Greg Holden steps into the spotlight from behind Phillip Phillips and 'Sons of Anarchy'

You may not know the name Greg Holden (unless you live in the Netherlands; he hit number two on the charts there).

But odds are good that you already know the British-born Lone Bellow tourmate’s songs — like the massive hit he co-penned for American Idol winner Phillip Phillips, and had several memorable TV placements in his own name, including this Target ad and his song “The Lost Boy,” which underscored a key sequence during the fifth season of Sons of Anarchy.

For the millions who watch that show, “The Lost Boy” is a eulogy for a fallen character, but the song was actually inspired by Dave Eggers’ novel What Is The What, about a group of Sudanese refugees. “If you listen to the lyrics, it’s not like you’d know that it was about a Sudanese refugee,” he tells EW. “I know what it’s about, but I’m really glad people are able to take their own meanings from it. I like it when songs have more meanings than just the one that was intended, so I’m glad that people were able to relate to it through Sons of Anarchy.” READ FULL STORY

Vampire Weekend will rock you -- then edit your free daily paper?

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Sorry, junior editors at the Metro newspapers — Vampire Weekend just got promoted ahead of you.

It’s been announced that the erudite foursome will “assistant edit” all Metro editions tomorrow, because everybody knows print journalism is where the real money is. (Sorry, band named Editors, guess you were overqualified.)

The one-day-only journalistic appointment at the newspaper chain (carried in New York, Boston, and Philadelphia) was described in the press release like so:

“Working together with the papers’ permanent editors, the band will choose subject matter to be covered by the publications while curating a special section devoted to the best foods of New York City.”

What’s next, Arcade Fire copyediting A.M. New York? Thom Yorke fact-checking Mother Jones? 2 Chainz executive-editing EW? (Yer out, Jason!) Let us know your dream musician-publication mash-up in the comments. We’d have Ryan Adams do it, but he’s busy making photocopies and getting us coffee.

Violent Femmes talk reunion, Central Park show

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When the organizers of Coachella reached out to the Violent Femmes to play this summer’s event, it had been six years since the much beloved indie-rock trio had performed a show, in part because of intra-band tensions.

“It was an offer that came to us through our booking agent,” singer-guitarist Gordon Gano tells EW. “I think he said in a communication, ‘I know there’s no chance in hell but I’ve got to let you know that there’s this going on.’ But we thought, ‘Yeah, alright, let’s see if we can get together and do this.’”

READ FULL STORY

Strokes guitarist Albert Hammond, Jr. on drug use: 'I used to shoot cocaine, heroin and ketamine'

Strokes guitarist Albert Hammond, Jr. is about to release a solo EP called AHJ — a collection of songs featuring seemingly confessional lyrics like “I can’t believe I lost my mind.”

It turns out right around the time his old band was peaking, so was Hammond—on a remarkable cocktail of narcotics. In a conversation with NME, the four-years-sober Hammond detailed his descent into addiction. “Oxycontin and cocaine at 24, 25, 26,” said Hammond, 33. ” And then I became [addicted to] heroin around then. So from 25, 27 till 29.”

“It’s not so much that I wasn’t in a happy place,” Hammond told the NME. “God knows where I was. I was just very high. I used to shoot cocaine, heroin and ketamine. All together. Morning, night, 20 times a day. I look back and I don’t even recognize myself. I did my own thing. I mean, you have moments when you’re fine. And if someone meets you, you seem fine.”

Luckily for Hammond, he managed to have his moment of clarity and get clean. “I think drugs were a great way to get out of your head. You enjoy that for a while, it helps you to go to new places,” he said. “But then it stops you from growing and puts you in a place where you’re just not as good as you could be. I’m not judging. I did it hard and for a long time, so I’m in no place to judge, nor would I. Something clicked one day, and I got out of it.”

The Strokes didn’t do any press surrounding their last album Comedown Machine, and Hammond still isn’t talking about that release. “We thought it’d be cool to keep a quietness to it, to see what a record would do [if you could only] listen to it,” Hammond said of the album, noting that he thought the press misunderstood it.

The five-track EP AHJ, due October 8 will be released on Strokes bandmate Julian Casablancas’ record label.

Sleigh Bells announce new album, single, and video, all called 'Bitter Rivals'

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Because all the world’s movie trailers aren’t going to soundtrack themselves, Sleigh Bells announced they have a new album coming out on October 8. It’s called Bitter Rivals (not to be confused with the UFC event of the same name), and the first single is the title track.

Though “Bitter Rivals” begins with a little acoustic strumming, it quickly morphs into the best kind of Sleigh Bells song: Raw, jittery, loud, and replete with the awesome chorus “You are my bitter rival/But I need you for survival.”

The video, made in collaboration with the Vice/Intel partnership The Creators Project, features also contains a bunch of scenes of singer Alexis Krauss shadow boxing, which will hopefully lead to some sort of title fight against Katy Perry. Check it out below.  READ FULL STORY

Labor Day Weekend music festivals: Where will you be?

Yes, it’s August 30, and it would take a flux capacitor to stop fall from coming. Whomp whomp.

But we say summer’s not over till somebody sings! Or in the case of the season’s final festivals, many, many bodies — bodies belonging to famous people with albums we enjoy.

Find our very anecdotal guide to some of the best fest options out there this long weekend, and tell us where you’ll be (and what we’ve missed) in the comments below.

The Everybody in the Pool Party: North Coast Music Festival (Chicago)

Featured artists: Passion Pit, Wu Tang, Afrojack, Nas, Gary Clark Jr., Nas, Mac Miller, the Disco Biscuits, Gary Clark Jr., Aluna George, Capital Cities, more.

The Heavy on Rock and Funny People Party: Bumbershoot  (Seattle)

Featured artists: Death Cab for Cutie, Fun., Heart, Kendrick Lamar, Bassnectar, Tegan & Sara, Alt-J, MGMT, Matt and Kim, the Breeders, plus comedians Marc Maron (with WTF Live), Patton Oswalt & Friends, Todd Barry, Reggie Watts, more.

The Made by Jay Z Party: Budweiser Made in America (Philadelphia)

Featured artists: Beyonce, Nine Inch Nails, Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, Queens of the Stone Age, Imagine Dragons, Public Enemy, 2 Chainz, Miguel, Emeli Sande, Kendrick Lamar, Wiz Khalifa, Solange, Haim, A$AP Rocky, AlunaGeorge, more.

The Sweaty Awesome Block Party:  Fool’s Gold Day Off (Brooklyn)

Featured artists: Duck Sauce, Danny Brown, A$AP Ferg, Migos, Run the Jewels, Unibros, more.

The Officially Bigger Than Glowsticks Dance Party:  Electric Zoo (Randalls Island, New York City)

Featured artists: Avicci, Tiesto, David Guetta, Bassnectar, Armand van Buuren, Sebastian Ingrosso, Steve Aoki, Zedd, Boys Noize, A-Trak, Above & Beyond, Knife Party, Benny Benassi, Baauer, Martin Solveig, Flux Pavilion, Alesso, Showtek

The Heartland Party: Warm Fest (Indianapolis)

Featured artists: Mayer Hawthorne, Michael Franti and Spearhead, Trombone Shorty & the Orleans Avenue, 3rd Bass, Delta Spirit, Big Head Todd & the Monsters, Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr.

 

Take a look at Nirvana's first record contract with Sub Pop, worth a hefty $600

“Six hundred bucks well spent—not that we had it at the time.”

The official Tumblr account of Sub Pop Records just put up a copy of Nirvana’s first contract, along with that note — the contract that would yield the band’s first album, 1989′s Bleach.

There are some remarkable pieces of history embedded in this artifact: The fact that the band was signed as a four-piece (featuring soon-to-be-departed members Chad Channing and Jason Everman, the latter of whom did not play on Bleach), that they were originally only signed for two years (it was set to expire at the end of 1991, though Sub Pop made a deal with DGC about Nirvana prior to the release of Nevermind), and that the band’s first advance was for a guaranteed $600 (with jumps up to $12,000 and $24,000 in the option years).

Of course, the band became far bigger than anybody at Sub Pop could have predicted back in ’89: They went on to sell over 30 million worldwide copies of their second album Nevermind and changed the course of popular music for a few years in the early ’90s.

As noted yesterday, Nirvana’s In Utero is getting the 20th anniversary box set treatment next month.

Courtney Love on making new music, getting back to acting, and more: An EW Q&A

Courtney Love is currently on tour through the end of this month, ripping through sets featuring Hole songs that sound as fresh as they did two decades ago. And after laying relatively low for a while, she’s got a lot coming up: A new album, a book, and a whole lot of social media suggestions. On her way to the airport, Love called in to give us updates on everything happening in Loveland.

EW: What inspired this tour you’re on?
Courtney Love: I was supposed to have a single out right now. Someone promised me a unicorn and then another unicorn, and then none of the unicorns came. I’m really pretty experienced now, so when people promise me unicorns, I really want to buy them, but I’m also really quick to say, “OK, f— off if there’s no unicorn coming.” But this is a fun tour. We have a guy named Ginger who is a brilliant guitar player. He’s like a [Billy] Corgan kind of guy, in the sense that he’s very gifted and very very loud. I have two very loud guitar players, so I’m always afraid my vocals will get drowned out. I’m also going to L.A. for a few days. I’m trying out for a film and I’m trying out for an HBO show, and I have a meeting for a Showtime show.

So you’re getting back into acting?
I have a new agent for the first time in a long time, and people thought—and for a while this was true—that I wasn’t interested in acting. But now I am, and I’m pursuing it really aggressively. I might even have to move back to L.A. to pursue it. We’ll see. I mean, I’m not Liev Schreiber, and I’m not going to play MacBeth at the Public [Theater], you know?

Do you relish the idea of moving back to Los Angeles after living in New York? READ FULL STORY

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