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Tag: Indie Rock (51-60 of 596)

Violent Femmes talk reunion, Central Park show

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When the organizers of Coachella reached out to the Violent Femmes to play this summer’s event, it had been six years since the much beloved indie-rock trio had performed a show, in part because of intra-band tensions.

“It was an offer that came to us through our booking agent,” singer-guitarist Gordon Gano tells EW. “I think he said in a communication, ‘I know there’s no chance in hell but I’ve got to let you know that there’s this going on.’ But we thought, ‘Yeah, alright, let’s see if we can get together and do this.’”

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Strokes guitarist Albert Hammond, Jr. on drug use: 'I used to shoot cocaine, heroin and ketamine'

Strokes guitarist Albert Hammond, Jr. is about to release a solo EP called AHJ — a collection of songs featuring seemingly confessional lyrics like “I can’t believe I lost my mind.”

It turns out right around the time his old band was peaking, so was Hammond—on a remarkable cocktail of narcotics. In a conversation with NME, the four-years-sober Hammond detailed his descent into addiction. “Oxycontin and cocaine at 24, 25, 26,” said Hammond, 33. ” And then I became [addicted to] heroin around then. So from 25, 27 till 29.”

“It’s not so much that I wasn’t in a happy place,” Hammond told the NME. “God knows where I was. I was just very high. I used to shoot cocaine, heroin and ketamine. All together. Morning, night, 20 times a day. I look back and I don’t even recognize myself. I did my own thing. I mean, you have moments when you’re fine. And if someone meets you, you seem fine.”

Luckily for Hammond, he managed to have his moment of clarity and get clean. “I think drugs were a great way to get out of your head. You enjoy that for a while, it helps you to go to new places,” he said. “But then it stops you from growing and puts you in a place where you’re just not as good as you could be. I’m not judging. I did it hard and for a long time, so I’m in no place to judge, nor would I. Something clicked one day, and I got out of it.”

The Strokes didn’t do any press surrounding their last album Comedown Machine, and Hammond still isn’t talking about that release. “We thought it’d be cool to keep a quietness to it, to see what a record would do [if you could only] listen to it,” Hammond said of the album, noting that he thought the press misunderstood it.

The five-track EP AHJ, due October 8 will be released on Strokes bandmate Julian Casablancas’ record label.

Sleigh Bells announce new album, single, and video, all called 'Bitter Rivals'

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Because all the world’s movie trailers aren’t going to soundtrack themselves, Sleigh Bells announced they have a new album coming out on October 8. It’s called Bitter Rivals (not to be confused with the UFC event of the same name), and the first single is the title track.

Though “Bitter Rivals” begins with a little acoustic strumming, it quickly morphs into the best kind of Sleigh Bells song: Raw, jittery, loud, and replete with the awesome chorus “You are my bitter rival/But I need you for survival.”

The video, made in collaboration with the Vice/Intel partnership The Creators Project, features also contains a bunch of scenes of singer Alexis Krauss shadow boxing, which will hopefully lead to some sort of title fight against Katy Perry. Check it out below.  READ FULL STORY

Labor Day Weekend music festivals: Where will you be?

Yes, it’s August 30, and it would take a flux capacitor to stop fall from coming. Whomp whomp.

But we say summer’s not over till somebody sings! Or in the case of the season’s final festivals, many, many bodies — bodies belonging to famous people with albums we enjoy.

Find our very anecdotal guide to some of the best fest options out there this long weekend, and tell us where you’ll be (and what we’ve missed) in the comments below.

The Everybody in the Pool Party: North Coast Music Festival (Chicago)

Featured artists: Passion Pit, Wu Tang, Afrojack, Nas, Gary Clark Jr., Nas, Mac Miller, the Disco Biscuits, Gary Clark Jr., Aluna George, Capital Cities, more.

The Heavy on Rock and Funny People Party: Bumbershoot  (Seattle)

Featured artists: Death Cab for Cutie, Fun., Heart, Kendrick Lamar, Bassnectar, Tegan & Sara, Alt-J, MGMT, Matt and Kim, the Breeders, plus comedians Marc Maron (with WTF Live), Patton Oswalt & Friends, Todd Barry, Reggie Watts, more.

The Made by Jay Z Party: Budweiser Made in America (Philadelphia)

Featured artists: Beyonce, Nine Inch Nails, Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, Queens of the Stone Age, Imagine Dragons, Public Enemy, 2 Chainz, Miguel, Emeli Sande, Kendrick Lamar, Wiz Khalifa, Solange, Haim, A$AP Rocky, AlunaGeorge, more.

The Sweaty Awesome Block Party:  Fool’s Gold Day Off (Brooklyn)

Featured artists: Duck Sauce, Danny Brown, A$AP Ferg, Migos, Run the Jewels, Unibros, more.

The Officially Bigger Than Glowsticks Dance Party:  Electric Zoo (Randalls Island, New York City)

Featured artists: Avicci, Tiesto, David Guetta, Bassnectar, Armand van Buuren, Sebastian Ingrosso, Steve Aoki, Zedd, Boys Noize, A-Trak, Above & Beyond, Knife Party, Benny Benassi, Baauer, Martin Solveig, Flux Pavilion, Alesso, Showtek

The Heartland Party: Warm Fest (Indianapolis)

Featured artists: Mayer Hawthorne, Michael Franti and Spearhead, Trombone Shorty & the Orleans Avenue, 3rd Bass, Delta Spirit, Big Head Todd & the Monsters, Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr.

 

Take a look at Nirvana's first record contract with Sub Pop, worth a hefty $600

“Six hundred bucks well spent—not that we had it at the time.”

The official Tumblr account of Sub Pop Records just put up a copy of Nirvana’s first contract, along with that note — the contract that would yield the band’s first album, 1989′s Bleach.

There are some remarkable pieces of history embedded in this artifact: The fact that the band was signed as a four-piece (featuring soon-to-be-departed members Chad Channing and Jason Everman, the latter of whom did not play on Bleach), that they were originally only signed for two years (it was set to expire at the end of 1991, though Sub Pop made a deal with DGC about Nirvana prior to the release of Nevermind), and that the band’s first advance was for a guaranteed $600 (with jumps up to $12,000 and $24,000 in the option years).

Of course, the band became far bigger than anybody at Sub Pop could have predicted back in ’89: They went on to sell over 30 million worldwide copies of their second album Nevermind and changed the course of popular music for a few years in the early ’90s.

As noted yesterday, Nirvana’s In Utero is getting the 20th anniversary box set treatment next month.

Courtney Love on making new music, getting back to acting, and more: An EW Q&A

Courtney Love is currently on tour through the end of this month, ripping through sets featuring Hole songs that sound as fresh as they did two decades ago. And after laying relatively low for a while, she’s got a lot coming up: A new album, a book, and a whole lot of social media suggestions. On her way to the airport, Love called in to give us updates on everything happening in Loveland.

EW: What inspired this tour you’re on?
Courtney Love: I was supposed to have a single out right now. Someone promised me a unicorn and then another unicorn, and then none of the unicorns came. I’m really pretty experienced now, so when people promise me unicorns, I really want to buy them, but I’m also really quick to say, “OK, f— off if there’s no unicorn coming.” But this is a fun tour. We have a guy named Ginger who is a brilliant guitar player. He’s like a [Billy] Corgan kind of guy, in the sense that he’s very gifted and very very loud. I have two very loud guitar players, so I’m always afraid my vocals will get drowned out. I’m also going to L.A. for a few days. I’m trying out for a film and I’m trying out for an HBO show, and I have a meeting for a Showtime show.

So you’re getting back into acting?
I have a new agent for the first time in a long time, and people thought—and for a while this was true—that I wasn’t interested in acting. But now I am, and I’m pursuing it really aggressively. I might even have to move back to L.A. to pursue it. We’ll see. I mean, I’m not Liev Schreiber, and I’m not going to play MacBeth at the Public [Theater], you know?

Do you relish the idea of moving back to Los Angeles after living in New York? READ FULL STORY

MGMT's best song in ages, 'Your Life Is a Lie,' gets a great video -- WATCH

We all know MGMT have a fame-and-fortune complex: When F&F beckoned, they responded with the snidely-titled Congratulations, which our then-critic called an “odd little sonic onion … [that] studiously avoided any obvious pop hook.”

Their third album, which comes out September 17, is self-titled, so it could be about anything. “Alien Days,” a space-out from the album that was released as a Record Store Day cassingle (LOL), suggested we were in for more of the same. But their bracing new single, “Your Life Is a Lie,” hints at an MGMT under new management.

Two minutes long and rather rude, “Your Life Is a Lie” is more or less the sound of a band pulling its head out of its ass. It’s got a gnarly, looping garage-rock drive, and more niceties than you’d expect from such a quickie: cowbell, an almost comically buzzy high-end, some kind of something solo that you could (yes) call spacey, and a magnificent hook.

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Hear Kathleen Hanna's new Julie Ruin song 'Ha Ha Ha' -- EXCLUSIVE

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After laying low for serious bummer reasons for several years, riot grrrl icon Kathleen Hanna is back. The Bikini Kill and Le Tigre veteran’s new project the Julie Ruin is set to release their debut album Run Fast on Sept. 3, and the band recently put out a great video for the lead single “Oh Come On.”

Now they’re releasing another new song from the album, the spiky, hyperactive “Ha Ha Ha,” which you can hear it exclusively here:

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Mumford & Sons get Jason Sudeikis, Jason Bateman and more to spoof them in 'Hopeless Wanderer' video -- WATCH

Mumford & Sons have got a sense of humor after all … is what you’re supposed to think after watching the video for “Hopeless Wanderer.”

The professional white funnymen Jason Sudeikis, Jason Bateman, Ed Helms and Wil Forte stand in for the band, wearing suspenders and fake beards, hauling their instruments down a dusty lane, playing in a row boat, crying, tasting each other’s tears, and eventually smashing their instruments and at least one of the filament bulbs lighting the barn they’re in.

Because you can’t make a parody these days without taking it over the top, Sudeikis and Forte also share an open-mouthed kiss.

I was more tickled by the smoke coming off Bateman’s hands during his banjo solo. Although the kiss seems less rote when you think of it as underlining the song’s vague references to a young man’s romantic confusion (key line: “I wrestled long with my youth,” snicker).

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Lollapalooza 2013 Day 2: Mumford & Sons set the tone, Kendrick Lamar ascends, and Postal Service run a victory lap

Most of the time, Lollapalooza’s scheduling seems left to the whims of fate, the daily lineup strung together seemingly at random so that indie poppers bump up against metal acts and soul throwbacks open for folky singer-songwriters. It makes for some wildly jarring juxtapositions, with occasional stumbles into transcendence.

Saturday was different, at least at the south end of Chicago’s Grant Park. The ascendance of headliners Mumford & Sons rippled all the way into the afternoon, where banjo-friendly arrangements and country twang informed the bulk of the performances: Court Yard Hounds brought their pop-friendly version of crossover bluegrass, Eric Church stomped through a set of outlaw Southern rock, and twee Irish strummers Little Green Cars crafted colorful tapestries out of all manner of acoustic thread. (The National, sandwiched in between Church and semi-main eventers the Lumineers, must have been deeply confused by all the headband-wearing sunflower girls hanging around, as they’re used to playing for broodier types. Still, they did dedicate “England” to Mumford & Sons.)

It all led up to a triumphant turn by Mumford & Sons, who drew a massive throng of folk-hungry youth to sing along with Marcus Mumford’s every bellow and wail. There wasn’t a single tune across Mumford’s nearly two-hour set that wasn’t greeted as a massive hit, though the gathering masses reserved extra glee for “Little Lion Man,” “I Will Wait,” and “Lover of the Light.”

Mumford & Sons are not showmen, and their performance was free of both bells and whistles, but their songs clearly resonate across a wide spectrum, and they’re savvy enough to get out of the way of their trainload of sing-alongs.

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