The Music Mix Music news, reviews, albums, concerts, and downloads

Tag: Indie Rock (61-70 of 595)

Lollapalooza 2013 Day 0: Queens of the Stone Age start the weekend early

The official start of Lollapalooza 2013 was set for 11:30 AM on Friday, when the School of Rock tykes unleash the weekend’s first notes on the Kidzapalooza stage. And though his band wasn’t set to kick off their Lolla performance until Friday evening, Queens of the Stone Age frontman Josh Homme had already started the party.

“I’m way high right now,” Homme told the sweaty crowd at the Metro on Thursday night during a raucous pre-Lollapalooza show. “Way higher than I look.”

He had clearly figured out the correct chemical cocktail for himself, as Homme and his gang of desert-rock ruffians plowed through nearly two hours of blistering riffs and druggy singalongs. READ FULL STORY

Watch the National perform 'This Is the Last Time' on 'The Artists Den' -- EXCLUSIVE

the-national-Artists-Den.jpg

The public-television concert series Live From the Artists Den is currently in its home stretch, but there are still a couple of great shows left. The next one, airing this Thursday, is going to feature the National — and you can watch a preview of it exclusively here.

The Brooklyn-via-Cincinnati band bring their characteristically dark and brooding vibe to the clip while performing their song “This Is the Last Time,” taken from their recently released sixth album Trouble Will Find Me.

Take a look at the clip below:

READ FULL STORY

Vampire Weekend bangs out carefree cover of Robin Thicke's 'Blurred Lines': Listen here

Vampire-Weekend-Review.jpg

Looks like Robin Thicke and the indie world have a little back-and-forth brewing.

Recently, you may recall, the “Blurred Lines” singer took on the Swedish electro-pop duo Icona Pop by Thicke-ifying their hot single “I Love It.” Before that, Queens of the Stone Age took their own crack at “Blurred Lines” while performing for the BBC.

And now the latest volley comes from Vampire Weekend, who offer what’s probably the most fun, unbuttoned cover of Thicke’s No 1 hit. Check it out below:

READ FULL STORY

L.A. rockers Family of the Year gets tropical in 'St. Croix' video -- EXCLUSIVE

family-of-the-year.jpg

If you’re stuck in a cubicle this summer, let Family of the Year take you away.

The L.A. band’s latest video for their single “St. Croix” is full of dreamy palm trees and darkly tropical vibes, just like the title implies. The song, off of their 2012 album Loma Vista, even comes with suggestive island-ready lyrics like, “You bring the ocean, I’ll bring the motion/Dancing all night in slow motion.” Wink wink!

Take a mini-vacation with the “St. Croix” video below:

READ FULL STORY

Radiohead's Thom Yorke angry about Spotify compensation, pulls music from streaming service

Another day, another English musician getting upset over his compensation from a streaming service.

Following in the footsteps of the gentlemen from Pink Floyd, Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke took umbrage with the amount of money paid to artists who allow their music on Spotify. “Make no mistake new artists you discover on #Spotify will no get paid,” Yorke tweeted. “Meanwhile shareholders will shortly being rolling in it. Simples.”

Yorke engaged in a Twitter exchange with his longtime producer and collaborator Nigel Godrich, who tweeted, “We’re off of Spotify. Can’t do that no more man. Small meaningless rebellion.”

That means that Spotify customers can no longer stream Yorke’s 2006 solo album The Eraser, the first album from Godrich’s Ultraista project, or the Atoms For Peace album Amok. “The reason is that new artists get paid f— all with this model. It’s an equation that just doesn’t work,” Godrich wrote on Twitter. “Meanwhile small labels and new artists can’t even keep their lights on. It’s just not right.”

More and more musicians have been speaking up about streaming services, who continually swear that their compensation packages are fair. In the eyes of Yorke and Godrich, services like Spotify (or Pandora, another frequent adversary of musicians) devalue the product created by artists.

Yorke drove that point home in his most recent tweet: “For me In Rainbows was a statement of trust. People still value new music,” he wrote, referencing the album his band released as a pay-what-you-want download back in 2007. “That’s all we’d like from Spotify. Don’t make us the target.”

UPDATE: Spotify released a statement in response to Yorke and Godrich’s tweets:

“Spotify’s goal is to grow a service which people love, ultimately want to pay for, and which will provide the financial support to the music industry necessary to invest in new talent and music,” a company spokesperson said today.

“We want to help artists connect with their fans, find new audiences, grow their fan base and make a living from the music we all love.

“Right now we’re still in the early stages of a long-term project that’s already having a hugely positive effect on artists and new music. We’ve already paid US$500M to rightsholders so far and by the end of 2013 this number will reach US$1bn. Much of this money is being invested in nurturing new talent and producing great new music.

“We’re 100% committed to making Spotify the most artist-friendly music service possible, and are constantly talking to artists and managers about how Spotify can help build their careers.”

What do you think? What will the tipping point be for Spotify and other streaming services? Do you believe there is a way for everybody to be fairly compensated while still delivering the same service?

Read More on EW.com:
Reassessing Radiohead
Pink Floyd writes an open letter on streaming services titled ‘Pandora’s Internet radio royalty ripoff’
Daft Punk breaks Spotify record, beat previous Mumford record

Hear Black Joe Lewis' new song 'Come to My Party' -- EXCLUSIVE

BLACK-JOE-LEWIS-COVER.jpg

There’s nothing like a little worked-up rock ‘n’ roll to get you through a post-holiday Tuesday, right? Let the Austin-based Black Joe Lewis oblige.

The band’s next album, Electric Slave, doesn’t hit streets until late August, but we’ve got a preview, “Come to My Party,” for you exclusively here. And beware: the track is on the funky side, full of urgency and sweaty swagger — a bit different from the heavy album cut “Skulldiggin,” which debuted online last month.

Take a listen to the new song below:

READ FULL STORY

M.I.A. finds more controversy, this time with her label over her documentary -- watch the trailer here

m-i-a.jpg

Musically, M.I.A. has lived up to her name — at least as it pertains to her forever-delayed new album Matangi.

The album has been bumped from a number of planned release dates, and at the moment it doesn’t have a place on the calendar. Which is strange, especially considering she’s a critically-beloved artist who had two major culture-jamming singles in “Paper Planes” and “Bad Girls.”

But it seems as though the delay may be because she’s on the outs with her label, Roc Nation (who, according to M.I.A., do not approve of positive jams). Along with Matangi, M.I.A. has been working on a documentary about her life with director Steve Loveridge.

The doc has been similarly delayed, and over the weekend Loveridge put up a five minute teaser for the flick on his Tumblr. YouTube pulled the video based on a copyright claim that came from the label; shortly thereafter, Loveridge published this vividly worded e-mail exchange between himself and a representative from Roc Nation.

The teaser was re-uploaded to Vimeo, and you can watch it below.  READ FULL STORY

EW's Fourth of July 2013 playlist: Stream our Spotify playlist here

Daft-Punk-Review

Beers! Burgers! Boats! Babes! Bros! Blurred Lines!

That’s right, it’s Fourth of July eve, which means it’s time to get yo’ jubilee on. And to help celebrate the U.S. of A.’s 237th HBD, we’ve put together the ultimate Independence Day playlist to blast at your backyard/rooftop/beach party.

After combing through this year’s choicest summer jams, we’ve recruited a select team of songs from the likes of Kanye, Disclosure, Vampire Weekend, Joey Bada$$ and more — plus a few evergreen oldie-but-goodies. (And before you look askance at foreigners like Disclosure and Daft Punk making our list, remember that America is all about inclusion! Except for “Blurred Lines”; we actually left that one off.)

So, with the power vested in us by Spotify, we hereby present you with our official Fourth of July 2013 playlist. Stream responsibly!

READ FULL STORY

Tuesday roundup: Beck debuts single, Janelle Monae drops new video

JANELLE-MONAE.jpg

If you haven’t noticed, it’s been a pretty good day for new music.

In addition to a new single from Robin “I Know You Want It” Thicke, a snazzy music video from Les Phoenix, and a deep dive into Ciara’s shower-dancing technique, the ‘nets have yielded two more goodies thanks to Beck and Janelle Monae.

Titled “I Won’t Be Long,” Beck’s new track is his second standalone single of the summer and, like it’s predecessor “Defriended,” has an interestingly low-key but spacey Beta Band-ish vibe,  with a dash of Spoon thrown into the mix.

Which, perhaps, is a long way of saying it’s very Beck; take a listen below:

READ FULL STORY

Phoenix drop 'Trying to Be Cool' video for the Creators Project: Watch it here

Phoenix-Review_612x380.jpg

For French electro-rock masterminds Phoenix, it never seems that being cool takes any effort.

Still, they managed to craft a track called “Trying to Be Cool” anyway, and they’ve paired it with an in-performance video that brings together all of the necessary elements for true coolness: Ladies in bikinis for no reason, guys blowing bubbles, cannons, a Marilyn Monroe tribute, an angry kid playing chess, solo ping pong, and a dance sequence straight out of Streets of Fire.

Check it out below:

READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Music

Advertisement

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP