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Tag: Indie Rock (71-80 of 633)

Laurie Anderson on Lou Reed's last hours: 'I have never seen an expression as full of wonder'

Laurie Anderson already wrote a very touching, sweet tribute to her late husband Lou Reed, who passed away last Sunday, October 27. But in the pages of the current issue of Rolling Stone, she expands upon both her personal and professional life with Reed.

In the piece, she recounts how she first met Reed in Munich in 1992. She was familiar with some of his work — but admits that she had always assumed the Velvet Underground were British and was confused that Reed didn’t have an accent. Once they connected, they rarely looked back.

“Lou and I played music together, became best friends and then soul mates, traveled, listened to and criticized each other’s work, studied things together (butterfly hunting, meditation, kayaking),” Anderson wrote. “We made up ridiculous jokes; stopped smoking 20 times; fought; learned to hold our breath underwater; went to Africa; sang opera in elevators; made friends with unlikely people; followed each other on tour when we could; got a sweet piano-playing dog; shared a house that was separate from our own places; protected and loved each other. We were always seeing a lot of art and music and plays and shows, and I watched as he loved and appreciated other artists and musicians. He was always so generous. He knew how hard it was to do. We loved our life in the West Village and our friends; and in all, we did the best we could do.” READ FULL STORY

Charts: Arcade Fire open on top, Eminem set for huge debut

Back in 2010, Arcade Fire scored their first number one with The Suburbs, an album that would go on to win the Grammy for Album of the Year. The Canadian collective is back on top with their follow-up Reflektor, which opens its sales life at the top of the Billboard 200 with 140,000 copies sold. That’s a solid number, though its slightly below the kickoff week for The Suburbs, which picked up 156,000. 

Of course, Arcade Fire only spent a single week at number one last time around — The Suburbs was dethroned by Eminem’s Recovery, which had returned to the top of the chart in its eighth week of release. It looks like history will be repeating itself: Eminem’s just-released The Marshall Mathers LP 2 is on track to sell between 700,000 and 750,000 units this week, which would easily give Slim Shady his 11th chart-topper and the second-biggest opening of the year behind Justin Timberlake’s The 20/20 Experience.

That would also be right on pace with the opening week of Recovery, which opened with 741,000 copies sold. Of course, he’ll fall well short of the premiere week for 2000’s The Marshall Mathers LP, which hit a staggering 1.76 million copies. Em will even fall short of the first Marshall Mathers LP‘s second week, which saw it do another 800,000. Still, Slim Shady has shown remarkable durability despite shifting cultural allegiances and mixed reviews.

Eminem also finds himself on top of the Digital Songs chart this week, with “The Monster,” his Rihanna-assisted single, selling 373,000 downloads. READ FULL STORY

Southern psych rockers Wax Fang debut 'Hearts Are Made for Beating' video -- EXCLUSIVE

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You may know Louisville psych rockers Wax Fang from their many tour dates with fellow Kentucky beardos My Morning Jacket, or their guest-starring soundtrack role on a memorable episode of FOX’s American Dad this spring centered around “the surreal sci-fi aftermath of Jeff Fischer’s alien abduction.”

Or maybe this is your introduction to the band — in which case, enjoy this cinematic lesson on kids, cardiology (hearts, what are they made for?), and balloon-icide. Enjoy!

Watch “Hearts Are Made for Beating” below: READ FULL STORY

Stream all of Heidecker & Wood's new album 'Some Things Never Stay the Same' - EXCLUSIVE

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Tim Heidecker is known primarily as one of the whacked-out comedy minds behind Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job! and Tom Goes to the Mayor. But he’s also got a penchant for melody and an obsession with ’70s rock, which manifests in Heidecker & Wood, his tag-team with Tim and Eric composer David Wood.

Their first album, Starting From Nowhere, genuflected at the altar of yacht rock, and their new album Some Things Never Stay The Same is an homage to crunchy ’70s singer-songwriter types like Randy Newman, Warren Zevon, and Harry Nilsson. The fact that its gently mocking shouldn’t get in the way of the fact that tunes like “Cocaine” and “Getaway Man” could easily have found their way onto the Singers & Songwriters series.

Some Things Never Stay The Same isn’t out until next Tuesday, November 12, but you can stream it in full below. You can also check out the video for “Getaway Man” below, and stay tuned to JASH (the YouTube network co-founded by Heidecker, Eric Wareheim, Michael Cera, Sarah Silverman,  and Reggie Watts) for more on Heidecker & Wood.  READ FULL STORY

Metallica's Lars Ulrich on Lou Reed: 'He's the most direct, pure person I've ever met'

After Lou Reed passed away last Sunday at the age of 71, we reached out to one of his friends and collaborators, Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich, who worked with him on his last major recording project, the 2011joint album LuluHe spoke to us about his first introduction to the Velvet Underground as a kid growing up in Denmark, their first meeting at an amusement park years later, and what working with Reed was like.

“My dad had a music room across from my room in the house I grew up in in Copenhagen, Denmark. There would be all kinds of crazy stuff coming out of there from the late ‘60s and early ‘70s: Hendrix, the Doors, Miles Davis, Janis Joplin, John Coltrane, all that kind of stuff. Among the things that came out of that room at that time was the Velvet Underground. I maybe wasn’t super aware of that when I was six years old, but a few years later we moved to America and [my Dad and I] started exchanging music that we were passionate about. I would sit there and play Iron Maiden or Motorhead, and he would play me some crazy stuff. And I remember we had some pretty next-level sessions with ‘Heroin’ and ‘Sweet Jane,’ and with Rock ‘n’ Roll Animal, some of that stuff. This was the first time I sat and got into it on a different level, probably around 1980 or 1981.

So obviously that type of stuff had a tremendous impact. I wasn’t quite in tune with the cultural impact of the New York scene and what it all meant, but as a musical relationship, it was very rich, and I loved what I was hearing and I connected with what I was hearing. Some people will talk about ‘the forefather of punk music’ and all that type of stuff. I wasn’t able to put it together in that type of context at that time because I was only 16, but those were the first couple of times I experienced Lou. READ FULL STORY

'Dallas Buyers Club' soundtrack: Hear new songs from Tegan and Sara, Neon Trees, My Morning Jacket and more - EXCLUSIVE PREMIERE

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One of this fall’s most anticipated movies, The Dallas Buyers Club, tells the true story of Texas native Ron Woodroof (Matthew McConaughey), whose 1986 HIV diagnosis, received in an era before treatment was readily available, spurred him to start his own prescription drug-smuggling ring.

The movie, which also stars Jared Leto, Steve Zahn, and Jennifer Garner, doesn’t open until this Friday, November 1, but you can stream the soundtrack exclusively here today. The album features brand new compositions by the likes of Tegan and Sara, My Morning Jacket, Fitz and the Tantrums, Neon Trees, Cold War Kids, and Leto’s own band Thirty Seconds to Mars. The album kicks off with Shuggie Otis’ stoned-soul anthem “Sweet Thang,” and also includes two classic T. Rex songs.

If you buy the album on iTunes (where it goes on sale today), 40 cents of every sale will go to the AIDS relief charity Project (RED)‘s Global Fund.  Jared Leto will be taking over Project (RED)’s Twitter account today at 11:30 AM Eastern/8:30 AM Pacific to answer questions about the movie, the soundtrack, and AIDS awareness.

Listen to the full album below: READ FULL STORY

Lou Reed and John Cale's 'Songs For Drella': Art's beating heart

Rock history is littered with band leaders who made game-changing contributions within the context of their groups, but struggled to make an impact on their own. For all the mind-blowing tunes he dealt out with the Rolling Stones, Mick Jagger’s solo output is pretty embarrassing, and though some of his post-Talking Heads music has been legitimately wonderful, David Byrne has never been able to replicate the Heads’ collective magic.

Not Lou Reed. His work with the Velvet Underground is rightfully heralded as legendary, but his solo career was just as powerful and inspiring. Throughout his solo run, Reed felt free to explore all sides of his personality, from the theatrical glam of Transformer to the sweet subversive pop of Coney Island Baby to the brutal drone of Berlin. Not all of his dalliances were successful—not even contrarian hipsters cop to liking the notoriously unlistenable Metal Machine Music, and his Metallica tag-team Lulu is problematic at best—but he took bold chances and hit more than he missed. READ FULL STORY

Velvet Underground's John Cale on Lou Reed: 'I've lost my school-yard buddy'

Though they founded the Velvet Underground together and collaborated on and off for nearly half a century, Lou Reed and John Cale had a relatively contentious relationship over the course of their intertwined careers. (As recently as earlier this year, Cale expressed consternation over Reed reviving their Andy Warhol tribute project Songs For Drella.)

But that was put aside following the news of Reed’s passing. Cale took to his Facebook page yesterday to express his thoughts on his former bandmate in the wake of his death. “The world has lost a fine songwriter and poet,” Cale wrote. “I’ve lost my ‘school-yard buddy.'”

Reed, Cale, Sterling Morrison and drummer Maureen Tucker launched the Velvet Underground in the mid 1960s and produced two albums together—1967’s The Velvet Underground and Nico and 1968’s White Light/White Heat—before Cale was replaced by Doug Yule for the band’s 1969 self-titled album. Cale and Reed clashed over control of the band and its direction, with Cale always trying to pull more and more into the droning sounds of tracks like “Venus In Furs.”

Since leaving the Velvet Underground, Cale had a moderately successful solo career (his signature album, 1973’s Paris 1919, is a classic of the genre) and has also done well as a producer, primarily for late former VU chanteuse Nico.

In 1989, Reed and Cale came together following the death of mutual friend and mentor Andy Warhol. The pair had not spoken to one another for years before Warhol’s memorial service in 1987, and they reunited in 1990 to write a song cycle about Warhol called Songs For Drella. Though they didn’t tour, they did make a concert film shot by ace cinematographer Ed Lachman, which is hard to find but well worth seeing. Cale and Reed last worked together on the Velvet Underground reunion tour in 1993.

Reed passed away yesterday, October 27. The cause of death has still yet to be announced, though he had recently undergone surgery for a liver transplant.

Down with '00s nostalgia! Up with the Dismemberment Plan!

It’s a columnist’s cliche to say so, but when it comes to unpleasant inevitabilities, nostalgia’s right up there with death and taxes: We know it lies in wait, poised to deny the whatever’s good right about life right now—age and maturity, cool new shit, the Present. But lately it feeds another perspective-sapping distraction: Microtargeted online lists meant to light up little networks of people who share largely meaningless past experiences, like what massive university they attended or chain store they shopped at in high school. That’s what really grinds my gears. Surely there exists a list of Signs You Listened to Emo. And surely we’re fine as a culture having moved on from emo’s heyday, whatever you might think of Fall Out Boy’s punky new album or that song Haley Williams made with Zedd (or the current output of Dischord Records, for that matter). And I say this as an unreconstructed emo boy. READ FULL STORY

Hear a new song from Canadian indie band Reuben and the Dark -- EXCLUSIVE

It’s time to shed some light on Reuben and the Dark. (Sorry, we couldn’t help it.)

The Calgary-based group is the newest signee to Canada’s Arts & Crafts, the label that gave us such Canadian delights as Broken Social Scene and Feist. The band, led by singer-songwriter Reuben Bullock, is currently working on their 2014 debut, coproduced by Florence and the Machine drummer Chris Hayden.

Get an early exclusive listen here with the single “Rolling Stone”:

READ FULL STORY

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