The Music Mix Music news, reviews, albums, concerts, and downloads

Tag: Indie Rock (71-80 of 696)

Blood Orange releases wonderfully sad remix of Sia's 'Chandelier'

Sia-Chandlier

Dev Hynes, better known as avant-R&B genius Blood Orange, has been lying low since suffering a catastrophic apartment fire back in the winter. But he’s been starting to regain some of the momentum that last November’s Cupid Deluxe album had begun to generate. He’s been getting back to releasing his series of consistently entertaining videos for Cupid Deluxe tracks.

Now, he’s released a radically deconstructed remix of Sia’s summer jam “Chandelier” that strips the song of its triumphal arena rock swagger and, well, pretty much everything else, which he’s replaced with his own vocals, a twitchy drum part, and a tasteful thumb piano part. In the process he’s remade one of the most inspirational get-pumped anthems of the year into an anxiety-ridden slow jam, stripping Sia’s chorus from its surroundings to let it hang almost unadorned in a way that transmutes its YOLO-ness into something starkly desperate. It does the exact opposite of the original, but it’s just as compelling.

READ FULL STORY

Haim teams up with A$AP Ferg on 'My Song 5' remix

Haim

“My Song 5″ is one of the more surprising moments on Haim’s breakout album Days Are Gone, interrupting a collection of clean-lined songs with an eccentrically gangly mishmash of angular melody, hard-rock drums, and a blatting, cartoony parody of a dubstep bass synth. The trio has doubled down on the song’s weirdness by releasing a new version with a verse from rapper A$AP Ferg, of “Shabba” fame.

Ferg’s verse is way raunchier than the original lyrics, but they continue the theme of confusion and garbled communication between romantic partners, and his raps work well with the song’s big-ass drums. Haim and Ferg are both coming off of highly successful records, and are well positioned to doing whatever they want next. They should consider messing with people’s heads and making a whole album together.

READ FULL STORY

We Were Promised Jetpacks find 'Safety in Numbers'

Scottish quintet We Were Promised Jetpacks have spent years refining a sound that’s melodic but muscular. In the process, they’ve made some fairly big waves in the indie rock world. This fall, they’ll be releasing their third LP, Unravelling, on FatCat Records—and it has the potential to make the band some fans in a more mainstream setting.

The track “Safety in Numbers” brings together arena-ready drums, widescreen guitars, and a booming piano part in a way that should make fans of U2 and Coldplay–not to mention the epically bummed-out Scottish indie bands whose legacy the Jetpacks are working in–quite happy.

Check out our exclusive track premiere here:

READ FULL STORY

'Weird Al' Yankovic: The Stories Behind The Songs

For 35 years, “Weird Al” Yankovic has been music’s most reliable satirist, sending up the biggest pop hits and the most iconic artists for the sake of belly laughs. He’s about to release a brand new album called Mandatory Fun on July 15, so to prepare for a fresh batch of tunes we caught up with Yankovic to get the stories behind hits both big and small.  READ FULL STORY

Beck: On the scene at New York's Hammerstein Ballroom

A few months back, I had the distinct pleasure of receiving a phone call from Beck. The connection wasn’t great, though I chalked that up to the fact that he was calling me from a parallel universe—one that was not wholly unlike the one I exist in, but both slightly more contemplative and way more funky.

We discussed the artists, albums, and songs that have informed his life, and more than once he brought up British death metal band Carcass (whose Surgical Steel was one of my favorite albums of 2013). He seemed mostly charmed by their insane-sounding song titles (“Cadaveric Incubator of Endoparasites” was a favorite), but based on Beck’s show at New York’s Hammerstein Ballroom on Monday night, he also digs Carcass because, when given the chance, he likes to shred. READ FULL STORY

Hear electropop duo Vow's ethereal new single 'Planks' -- Exclusive

Vow-premier.jpg

Vow is an L.A.-based duo, consisting of multi-instrumentalist Andrew Thomas and vocalist Julia Blake, who are giving a contemporary update to the gothy ambience and gauzy textures of ’80s and ’90s dream-pop (which is currently in the midst of a fairly serious comeback). On August 12, they’ll release their second EP, Make Me Yours, on the buzzy Native Sound label, the follow-up to last summer’s Make Me Young. The lead single, “Planks,” boasts a propulsive electro foundation topped with reverb-drenched piano and washes of ambient guitar noise, as well as a swoony vocal performance by Blake that should appeal to fans of the Cocteau Twins and Lana Del Rey.

Blake says of the track, “Andrew approached me with the instrumental for this song when I was learning I was in love with someone who was addicted to unnecessary suffering. ‘Planks’ is about caring for someone when they are at their lowest and wanting all their pain to go away, but in the end, love just sometimes isn’t enough.”

READ FULL STORY

Pink Mountaintops unveil fiery new video for 'Second Summer of Love'

The Second Summer of Love was a period in the late ’80s where MDMA, Chicago acid house, and British youth culture collided explosively to create what came to be called “raving.” It’s also the title of a ripping new song from the new album, Get Back, by Canada’s greatest extant rock band Pink Mountaintops.

The song is a vaguely apocalyptic portrait of subultural youth, and the video takes it a step further with a bunch of grunge kids wielding baseball bats, riding flaming skateboards, and looking existential in front of pyrotechnic displays. You’re not likely to see this much ennui and fire in one place all day.

Hit the jump to check it out. READ FULL STORY

Karen O will release her home-recorded debut solo album in September

The last Yeah Yeah Yeahs album, Mosquito, was their most elaborate recording to date, complete with the gospel choir that’s pretty much de rigueur for overproduced rock records. For her upcoming debut solo album, frontwoman Karen O is going hard in the opposite direction. Crush Songs, which will be released on Strokes singer Julian Casablancas’s Cult Records on September 9, is a collection of stripped-down, lo-fi home recordings along the lines of “The Moon Song,” her Oscar-nominated contribution to the soundtrack for Spike Jonze’s Her.

The material on Crush Songs was recorded in 2006 and 2007, during the peak of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs post-Fever to Tell popularity. Karen O was 27 at the time, and according to a quote in her press release, she “crushed a lot” during that time.

Crush Songs will be available on CD, digitally, and in a special limited edition that includes a sunburst-colored vinyl album and a set of personal drawings with handwritten lyrics, which is available for pre-order now.

Exclusive music video: K.Flay's hook-filled 'Thicker Than Dust'

KFLAY.jpg

As big as hip-hop’s tent has gotten, Bay Area rapper K.Flay still stands out as something of an oddity: a Stanford double-major (psychology and sociology) who’s worked with Liam Howlett from ’90s electro-punks the Prodigy and toured with Icona Pop and Passion Pit.

After a stint on a major label, she’s gone independent for her new album Life as a Dog, which she crowdfunded through PledgeMusic. The album, out today, pairs spaced-out rap beats and chiming indie rock that K.Flay tops with her frequently tricky flows, making a chocolate-in-my-peanut-butter situation that should please rap-loving indie rockers, or the other way around.

After the jump, we have an exclusive first look at her new video for the uber-hooky single “Thicker Than Dust.”

READ FULL STORY

Veruca Salt's fan-assisted 'It's Holy' video -- EXCLUSIVE PREMIERE

Record Store Day 2014 marked the official recorded return of Veruca Salt, the Chicago-born quartet whose albums American Thighs and Eight Arms To Hold You are definitive entries in any ’90s alt-rock fan’s collection. The band’s original lineup—Louise Post, Nina Gordon, Steve Lack, and Jim Shapiro—hadn’t played together since 1998, but they have stormed back  with a pair of tracks on a limited-edition 10-inch piece of vinyl that ended up being one of the big gets of RSD.  READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Music

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP