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Tag: Kanye West (21-30 of 247)

Busta Rhymes invites Kanye West, Lil Wayne, and Q-Tip along for 'Thank You' video: Watch it here

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What do we do with Busta Rhymes in 2013? It’s been more than a minute since his peak years of mainstream relevance — his first big break came on A Tribe Called Quest’s immortal 1992 single “Scenario” — but 2012’s Year of the Dragon was surprisingly strong, and there are more hits than misses on his Catastrophic mixtape from last year.

The internet has also been fairly excited about his new tag-team tape with Q-Tip, thanks to the single “Thank You,” which lets Busta do his lightning-tongue thing over some groovy old school new soul funk. It features the best Q-Tip verse in years, plus drop-ins from Kanye West and Lil Wayne — both of whom also appear in the spartan but satisfying video that just dropped this morning.

Give the clip a spin below and marvel at Kanye’s unwavering stare during one of Q-Tip’s verses at the 2:37 mark. It’s freaky: READ FULL STORY

Kanye West makes Kim Kardashian star of 'Bound 2': Watch it here

Kanye West is on quite the charm offensive.

Yesterday, ‘Ye dropped by a college in Boston — well, not in Boston, but nearby — to give not only a surprisingly self-deprecating speech but also free tickets to his Yeezus tour stop at TD Garden.

Then, this morning, he stopped by Ellen‘s studio to premiere his latest video for “Bound 2,” starring his fiancée Kim Kardashian, who rides on a motorcycle with her man and without a helmet.

Oh, and she’s topless.

And with that, let’s get straight to the video:

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Kanye West lectures at Harvard; shows a surprising self-deprecating side -- VIDEO

Just call him Professor Yeezy.

The loquacious rapper (and College Dropout) made a pit stop at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design on Sunday as part of his DONDA design lecture series. West spoke of the importance of design and why things must be ‘architected,’ and then gave everyone in the class free tickets to his concert later that night at Boston’s TD Garden.

Fiancé Kim Kardashian was by his side (though apparently not in the best of seats), and Instagrammed this photo:



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Busta Rhymes debuts new song 'Thank You' with Kanye, Q Tip, and Lil Wayne -- hear it here

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Oh you know, just a bunch of bros hanging out and being legendary, lending a hand to other bros.

Kanye West, Q-Tip, and Lil Wayne join Busta Rhymes — and a fat-bottomed sample from Alicia Meyer’s 1981 disco treasure  “I Want to Thank You” — on a new track from Busta’s upcoming Extinction Level Event 2, due next year.

And it’s pretty awesome; listen below: READ FULL STORY

Kanye West resumes Yeezus tour, reschedules several dates

He is risen! Except in Vancouver, Montreal, Minneapolis, and St. Louis. (Logistics, man. Sorry.)

Following a tour bus accident last week in Vancouver that severely damaged stage equipment, including a custom video truss and 60-foot circular LED screen, Kanye’s Yeezus tour is back on, per official word from his camp.

The tour resumes Nov. 16 in Philadelphia and wraps in Toronto on Dec. 23; three of the missed dates have been rescheduled, though four won’t be able to be made up.

See the full statement and new dates below: READ FULL STORY

Kanye and Lindsay Lohan drop in on Thirty Seconds to Mars' 'City of Angels' video: Watch it here

Jared Leto is getting serious awards-related attention for his performance in the about-to-be-released film The Dallas Buyers ClubBut the actor is also, famously, a musician and a filmmaker (he directs under the name Bartholomew Cubbins), and it’s those skills he applies to the new short film that accompanies the Thirty Seconds to Mars song “City of Angels.”

The song, from the soundtrack to The Dallas Buyers Club, is a tribute to Los Angeles, and the 11-minute film features testimonials from from a variety of L.A. denizens, including Kanye West, Lindsay Lohan, Selena Gomez, James Franco, Corey Feldman, Alan Cumming, Los Angeles Lakers guard Steve Nash, and a handful of celebrity impersonators and street performers. The key quote? Kanye West declares “Fame is f—ing awesome!”

Watch the whole thing below, and don’t forget to stream the entirety of the excellent soundtrack to The Dallas Buyers Club

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Kanye West talks Taylor Swift, Kimmel, and building his own city

Have you missed the dulcet tones of Yeezy opining for the last 24 hours? Never fear; the rapper stumbled upon yet another audible mic yesterday, delivering a full 30 minutes of non sequitur speech glory during an interview with Los Angeles’ 97.1 AMP Radio.

If we’ve learned anything from his past monologues, it is that a Kanye rant follows no logical order — though it will reference Paris haute couture and Kim Kardashian at least once.

In one of many moments of hyper self-awareness, West stalled a scheduled game of word association in order to explain the rant as an art form: “Rant has a negative connotation,” he said. “And these are inspirational, visionary, breaks in pop culture. Every time I talk, it is a crack in the matrix. When I wake up, ‘cause nobody’s gonna fire me tomorrow, so I can say anything I want to say. And luckily, I want to say positive things. And I want to make my mama happy, and I want to do God’s work.”

It turns out, he also still has thoughts on his infamous Taylor Swift 2009 VMAs Episode Interruptus: “We still haven’t seen a video as good as that video. Like five years later, we still haven’t seen a video that good,” referring to Beyoncé’s “Single Ladies.” Oh and that Jimmy Kimmel feud? West wanted to clear the air about calling himself a “creative genius:” “But that’s just my title,” he said. “I don’t know any other way to explain what I do.” READ FULL STORY

Kanye West talks Jay Z, Jesus, Arsenio and more at Las Vegas show -- watch the video

Sweet baby Yeezus! Kanye West delivered his latest rant via sermon at his Las Vegas concert on Friday.

“What fun is life if you don’t talk sh–t right?” West asked his congregation—err, audience—at the MGM Grand Garden Arena. “‘Cause everybody gon’ talk shit to you, right? Anybody gonna tell you what you can, you can’t do, right?” he continued, while wearing typical priestly vestments of an oversized trenchcoat, fencing mask, and neon orange sneakers.

In a nearly ten minute long monologue, complete with piano accompaniment and and a glaring spotlight, West delivered a diatribe referencing old standby subjects including but not limited to: haters, Arsenio Hall, Paris fashion week seating arrangements, and Jesus. West even joined in on the Barneys’ racial profiling allegations, saying, “It’s that rich n—er racism!” before breaking into a sprint onstage. Looking equal parts Joel Osteen and beekeeper, he also compared his Yeezus persona to a high self esteem drug and explained his Chosen One association: “And when I say I am a god, it’s because I believe that God is inside of all of us.”

Play “find the complete sentence” in Kanye’s latest rant here: READ FULL STORY

Kanye West explains bringing 'Jesus' on tour and using his 'white' voice

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From Zane Lowe to Jimmy Kimmel, Kanye West is the best at making headlines.

This week, the rapper stopped by San Francisco’s Wild 94.9 JV show  to talk about bringing Jesus onstage, his own relationship with God, and why he uses his “white voice” with the press.

Addressing his Yeezus meets Jesus collaboration, which served as the intro to “Jesus Walks” during his Seattle tour opener last Saturday, West said, “I had a friend of mine who’s a pastor there as we started discussing how we want to deliver it… My girl even asked afterwards, ‘Hmm, is that weird if Jesus comes on stage?’ No, we do plays all the time. People play Jesus. You know what’s awesome about Christianity is we’re allowed to portray God? We’re allowed to draw image of him, we’re allowed to make movies about him.”

As for bringing Jesus center-stage, Kanye was just relaying a message to his fans about the power of a strong relationship through Christ.

“You can have a relationship with Jesus, you can talk to Jesus,” he said. Anytime the word Jesus can be used more in our lives, it’s a good thing. Even if it’s the title, Yeezus. With my heroes, people want to be like Mike, I want to be like Christ.”

Kanye also addressed the criticism received for the change of tone in his voice in some of his interviews:

“What I didn’t know, and I really didn’t know about until a couple of years go was that it’s not about race, it’s about class,” he said. “Even when you’re in certain magazines, it’s still like a Dinner for Schmucks situation. Are they inviting you to be a part of your situation, or are they inviting you to laugh at your teeth? We have our thing that every time we do it, we give them the ‘white’ voice.”

Pusha T, the Last Great Gangsta Rapper

How gangsta is Pusha T? So gangsta that on his first official solo album, the killer My Name Is My Name, the marvelously menacing Virginia rapper includes a soaring inspirational anthem, “Hold On”—and invites the profoundly unsentimental Rick Ross to join him on it. (Though “[you] couldn’t fathom my wealth/Build a school in Ethiopia/should enroll there myself” may be Ross’s most civic-minded statement yet.) He’s so gangsta that he calls a song that features Chris Brown “Sweet Serenade.” He’s so gangsta that he has Jeezy, a relic of the peak-thug era, rap on “No Regrets.”

Pusha—one half of the sadly dormant coke rap duo Clipse, prolific mixtape and guest rapper and member of Kanye West’s G.O.O.D. Music—sums himself up this way on “No Regrets”: “Nowadays I sell hope/what, you rather I sell dope?/What I sell is a lifestyle/naked bitches on sailboats.” That’s “hope” the way Rick Ross can understand it. Pusha remains a deadpan, do-it-to-death thug whose self-awareness never undermines his drug-dealer fairy tales.

Which makes him an exception among the great rappers with recent albums. Danny Brown, who just released the terrific Old, uses meanness as just another one of his masks. Drake surrenders to complexity—he’s tougher on Nothing Was the Same, but still like a boyfriend who’s needy at home and aloof around your friends. On Doris, Earl Sweatshirt is utterly—and engrossingly—cerebral. And then there are the A$APs: image jockey Rocky and the inspiringly weird Ferg. Pusha may be the last gangsta standing—not an anachronistic monolith, but a living, snarling monument to hardcore hip hop.

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