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Tag: Let's Argue! (1-10 of 318)

Grammys Winner Snubs and Surprises: Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath steal, Kanye West and Kendrick Lamar get robbed

Last night, there was a tweet floating around the Internet that noted that Macklemore & Ryan Lewis had already amassed four Grammys and legendary artists like Tupac, Notorious B.I.G., Jimi Hendrix, the Beach Boys, and the Who have a grand total of zero among them.

The suggestion, of course, is that possessing an  an armload of Academy-issued gold sippy cups doesn’t necessarily have any real correlation to artistic greatness.

Still, that doesn’t mean there weren’t some head-scratching decisions and maddening snubs during last night’s telecast, most of which happened off-camera. As surprised as Taylor Swift was that Daft Punk won the Grammy for Album of the Year last night, the French duo’s victory can’t entirely be called an upset; though there were some mild surprises among the awards handed out live at the 56th Annual Grammy Awards, there wasn’t a single on-camera score that could be considered a true surprise of snub.

Luckily, there were dozens more awards given out before the televised show even started, and there lives a parade of outrage.  READ FULL STORY

Lady Gaga talks auras, outer space, and her new app with SiriusXM: An on-the-scene report

Lady Gaga may not be a superhero, but she can seem that way to her fans — and she did little to discourage that idea today when about 30 people were invited to a special fan Q&A (it will be available to a much wider audience tonight on SiriusXM Hits 1).

Prior to her arrival, anticipation built: Would she enter via the elevator like a mere mortal? Would she beam down from the giant neon light in the ceiling? She eventually did arrive (through a door) — in elegant, superhero-esque cape sleeves, natch — and the room erupted in gasps. “She’s actually here!” an excited woman said from somewhere in the room.  Full disclosure: That woman may have been me.

During the interview, Lady Gaga was The Gaga we’ve come to expect — simultaneously goofy and over-the-top passionate. She discussed her album inspirations, collaborators like R. Kelly and The Muppets (“Kermit and I used to date!”), and couldn’t resist dancing a bit in her chair when “Bad Romance” blasted over the speakers. READ FULL STORY

'Hey Ya!' turns 10: How does the party jam hold up against 'Wrecking Ball'?

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Monday marks the 10th anniversary of OutKast’s “Hey Ya!” from the double album Speakerboxx/The Love Below. (Feel old yet?) Today also marks the debut of Miley Cyrus’ “Wrecking Ball” music video from the pop star’s I’M AN ADULT campaign. (Feel even older?) In honor of the continuing tradition of the power ballad, below we compare the super-stylized music videos for “Hey Ya!” and “Wrecking Ball” to determine whether Miley’s latest can stand the test of time as well as its predecessor.
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Justin Timberlake responds to 'Take Back the Night' controversy, says song title was a coincidence

Justin Timberlake was too busy bringing sexy back to go to college — which, on the whole, seems to have worked out just fine for him.

Unfortunately, it also means that when Timberlake decided to call his next single “Take Back the Night,” he apparently had no idea that the name was already trademarked by a sexual assault awareness foundation that’s been holding emotionally-charged campus events since the ’70s.

Luckily, the Internet was there to inform Timberlake of his folly — leading the singer to release the following statement to Radar:

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How we chose our 100 All-Time Greatest Albums

Hey, “LOL” and “NerdyGirl55″—we heard you. Nonetheless, here comes an explanation of how (and why) we picked our 100 Greatest Albums of All-Time list. Hopefully, Nerdy—do you mind if I call you Nerdy? Your EW.com comment condemning our list suggests some level of comfort and familiarity—you don’t throw your laptop against the wall, like you say you did your All-Time Greatest issue of the magazine, after reading this.

Like you, we love movies and TV and books and music—it’s our passion (and also, of course, our day job). And you know what? Love doesn’t always come easy. For instance, Love’s “psychedelic beauty” Forever Changes landed at No. 65 on our final list, but not without a lot of arguing and back and forth amongst the writers and editors. And that’s how, over time, a list like this takes form and gets made.

Everyone has their personal biases. My own top 100 list would have a few more Bowie records; The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars found itself at No. 34, but I’d happily add Hunky DoryStation to Station, and Scary Monsters. I’d also want to add at least one more from from the Who—Tommy, can you hear me?—in addition to Who’s Next (No. 39). To make room, I’d probably cut an album or two from the Beatles, maybe one from Dylan. (He has two on the list: Blood on the Tracks at No. 6, and Highway 61 Revisited at No. 27.) And, for that, I know more than a few of you would probably want to cut me.

But in order for a list like this to come to life, clearly those personal biases need to be put aside. Professionally, I can’t argue against the Beatles being the most important and significant act of the album era, which we thought would make the best parameters for a definitive Entertainment Weekly music list. (Imagine a greatest songs of all time list in which you had to size up a traditional folk staple like “Greensleeves” against “Eleanor Rigby.”) That’s why our oldest entry (1965’s Rubber Soul, the album the lovely ladies above are packing at the EMI factory in 1965, which ranks No. 46) and our top entry (Revolver, perched at No. 1) belong to the Fab Four: They ushered in and defined the album era, not to mention pop music generally for the past 50 years. (In a recent interview, über-producer Rick Rubin put it thusly: “It’s much bigger than four kids from Liverpool. For me the Beatles are proof of the existence of God. It’s so good and so far beyond everyone else that it’s not them.”)

Not surprisingly, we received a lot of mail about Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band not making our final list; demerits were given for, among other things, “Lovely Rita.” (Not to mention every terrible album featuring a sitar that came after.) But four of our 100 albums are by the Beatles, so the point of their importance is made; they dominate our list. However, we also needed to consider that there have been thousands of albums, and many very, very good to great ones of differing genres. (As much as we love classical and jazz, it made the most sense for us to reflect what we tend to cover in the magazine and what fills our readers’ iPods: pop, rock, and hip-hop.)

Plus, let’s face it:  It’s 2013, and for us to all assume nothing good happened in music after 1970 is just plain silly. So artists like Kayne West (No. 8 for My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy) and Adele (No. 17 for 21) need to be weighed against the no-brainer entrants such as the Beatles and Rolling Stones. Which also means you need to consider legacy and what’s going on in the culture right now that refocuses the lens: Daft Punk’s Discovery jumped a few spots (to No. 24) from when we started this list several months ago, because there’s a strong argument (of which I am sure some of you will take me up on below) that they’re largely responsible for the global rise of EDM, and even though their recent Random Access Memories has received rave reviews, it’s Discovery that made their current success at all possible. As indispensable as Pearl Jam’s Ten seemed 20 years ago, it’s hard to not take into account every awful Creed album it paved the way for.

We also wish it were possible to cram 500 albums into a top 100 list. It’s not, of course, but hopefully the takeaway from our 100 Greatest Albums list is an accurate snapshot of the landscape, defining artists, and game-changing music moments over the past 50 years. We will certainly argue it is.

John Mayer's new single 'Paper Doll' -- is it about Taylor Swift? You decide!

It’s been a while since we’ve heard John Mayer’s voice, thanks to the barrage of health problems that drove him to announce an “indefinite” break from life performing in March 2012.

But you can’t keep a good guitar O face down! Mayer has since gotten well enough to embark on his first tour in three years — and to record a new single, a mellow, Jack Johnson-y summer jam called “Paper Doll.” (The song’s newly-released lyric video features Joanna Rohrback, a.k.a. the Prancercise Lady, because Mayer must resent how Josh Groban always gets to be the funny one.)

At first listen, the song sounds like it was assembled from fragments of a J. Crew catalog: “Paper doll, come try it on/Step out of that black chiffon [...] Fold a scarf, Moroccan red/Tie your hair behind your head,” Mayer croons.

But pay closer attention to the chorus (“You’re like 22 girls in one/And none of them know what they’re running from”) and a few of its more pointed couplets (“Strap into some heels that hurt/You shoulda kept my undershirt”), and “Paper Doll” turns into a gentle breakup ballad — one that could very well be directed at Mayer ex Taylor Swift, who famously blasted her relationship with Mayer in Speak Now‘s track “Dear John.”

Consider also how Swift’s song includes lyrics about being “the girl in the dress” and Mayer “paint[ing her] a blue sky,” while “Paper Doll” includes a catalog of dresses and this line: “And if those angel wings don’t fly/Someone’s gonna paint you another sky.” (Also, Swift’s last single was called “22”.)

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Stone Temple Pilots file lawsuit against former lead singer Scott Weiland

Stone Temple Pilots have filed a lawsuit against their former lead singer Scott Weiland to stop him from using the band’s name or music to further his own career and accusing him of attempting to sabotage the band’s new single, “Out of Time.” Weiland and the group split up in February with Linkin Park’s Chester Bennington now taking lead vocals in STP.

Weiland then released an open letter to fans on his official website stating that the band has no right to tour and call themselves STP without Weiland’s involvement. Wrote Weiland, “First of all they don’t have the legal right to call themselves STP because I’m still a member of the band. And more importantly, they don’t have the ethical right to call themselves Stone Temple Pilots because it’s misleading and dishonest to the millions of fans that have followed us for so many years.”

Boy-band feud alert: Did One Direction just copy Backstreet Boys' album title?

Is One Direction copying the Backstreet Boys’ style — and their titles?

In the 1990’s, boy-band feuds were a dime a dozen — back when TRL was filled with screaming girls who wanted nothing more than to be serenaded by the likes of ‘N Sync, Backstreet Boys, and 98 Degrees. But today, TRL is no more, and boy bands aren’t nearly the fad they used to be.

That hasn’t stopped the multiplatinum U.K. X Factor breakouts One Direction from making a whole new generation of young girls scream at ear-piercing volumes. But is One Direction borrowing a little too blatantly from the still-active Backstreet Boys?

When BSB’s AJ McClean stopped by TMZ last year, he wasn’t shy about expressing his opinion on One Direction’s eerily familiar lyrics. Check out the video below:


And now, One Direction’s Liam Payne has tweeted that the official title of the band’s upcoming movie, which was known as 1D3D, has now changed to This Is Us:

Fans of the Backstreet Boys will quickly recognize that as the name of BSB’s most recent album and tour. Could this be the next boy-band feud in the making? And if the answer is yes, whose side are you on?

Read more:
Justin Bieber, One Direction, and Taylor Swift top list of Radio Disney Music Awards nominees: EXCLUSIVE
One Direction’s Harry Styles tattoos large butterfly across his chest. That’s what makes him beautiful. — PHOTO
PopWatch Confessional: Stuck on a 90’s feud — A Backstreet Boys fan talks ‘N Sync

Carly Rae Jepsen cancels Boy Scouts concert

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Carly Rae Jepsen doesn’t want the Boy Scouts to call her. Ever.

The singer was set to headline the Boy Scouts’ 2013 Jamboree this summer, but after a Change.org petition, which gathered 62,000 signatures in just four days, asked Jepsen to reconsider, she did. “As talented artists with incredibly loyal LGBT fans around the globe, I hope they will speak out quickly, and urge the Boy Scouts to end its dangerous anti-gay policy,” the petition read in part.

“As an artist who believes in equality for all people, I will not be participating in the Boy Scouts of America Jamboree this summer,” Jepsen wrote on Twitter this morning. “I always have and will continue to support the LGBT community on a global level and stay informed on the ever changing landscape in the ongoing battle for gay rights in this country and across the globe.” READ FULL STORY

Selena Gomez covers 'Cry Me A River' -- VIDEO

It seems like only yesterday that a rain-soaked Justin Timberlake was giving a public kiss-off to a Britney Spears lookalike.

With the apparent break up (again!) of teen pop’s current reigning couple, Selena Gomez has turned to the Timberlake classic to tell Justin Bieber she was done. Texting is sooo 2005.

In concert over the weekend, a hippie-fied (Seriously! Check the flowers!) Gomez told the crowd, “This song definitely speaks to me,” before launching into “Cry Me A River.” Girl was definitely working through some feelings – she also covered Taylor Swift’s “I Knew You Were Trouble” and Britney Spears’ “…Baby One More Time,” during the performance.

When Bieber and Gomez broke up (the first time!) in November, Bieber also turned to Timberlake to get the message across, performing “Cry Me A River” in concert. Now, Gomez has returned the favor. What did teenage superstars do before JT and YouTube combined to give them a perfect way to send a “subtle” message to the other? Your move, Biebs.

Watch Gomez’s cover below: READ FULL STORY

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