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Tag: Lou Reed (1-10 of 16)

Bob Dylan, Kraftwerk among 2015 Grammy Hall of Fame inductees

Tuesday’s a big day for halls of fame, apparently: Earlier, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame announced their latest inducteesa group that included Ringo Starr and Lou Reedand just a bit later, the Grammys released the details of their own batch of new inductees.
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Lou Reed, Green Day join Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

The Beatles were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame back in 1988, but now Ringo Starr’s entering the hall solo: The drummer is one of the newest inductees along with Lou Reed, Green Day, Joan Jett & the Blackhearts, Bill Withers, Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble, the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, and the “5” Royales.

Starr will be given the Award for Musical Excellence, an honor that goes to musicians who aren’t exactly in the spotlight that last went to the E Street Band in 2014. The “5” Royales, an R&B band popular in the ’50s, will be inducted in the Early Influences category, while the rest of the musicians will be inducted in the Performers category. READ FULL STORY

Lou Reed, Nine Inch Nails make Rock and Roll Hall of Fame nominees list

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame announced the list of induction nominees for 2015, including big names like The Smiths, Nine Inch Nails, Sting, and Lou Reed—the rock ‘n’ roll legend who died earlier this year after decades in the business, as the frontman for The Velvet Underground and a wildly successful solo artist. The 15 selections come from a wide variety of genres and decades—from ’60s Motown (The Marvelettes) and ’60s/’70s R&B (The Spinners), to ’70s disco (Chic) and ’80s hard rock (Joan Jett & The Blackhearts) and hip-hop (N.W.A.), up through contemporary pop-punk (Green Day).

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Five reasons everybody's mad at the Grammys

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As with every awards show ever, last night’s Grammys ceremony has inspired a glut of reactions online — not all of them good. So what’s the pitchfork-wielding mob upset about this morning? Here’s a sampling:

1. They misspelled Cory Monteith’s name

As we noted last night, the Grammy proofreaders dropped the ball on honoring the late Glee star (see above). Not a good look, guys.

2. They cut off the closing act

In a show woefully short on straight-up rock music (but thank you, Metallica!), many were looking forward to the epic confluence of Nine Inch Nails, Lindsey Buckingham, Queens of the Stone Age, and Dave Grohl. Which viewers at home caught some of before the Grammys rudely interrupted the guitar heroes with a Delta promo —  and then ended the telecast altogether. Trent Reznor had some feelings about it, too: READ FULL STORY

Laurie Anderson on Lou Reed's last hours: 'I have never seen an expression as full of wonder'

Laurie Anderson already wrote a very touching, sweet tribute to her late husband Lou Reed, who passed away last Sunday, October 27. But in the pages of the current issue of Rolling Stone, she expands upon both her personal and professional life with Reed.

In the piece, she recounts how she first met Reed in Munich in 1992. She was familiar with some of his work — but admits that she had always assumed the Velvet Underground were British and was confused that Reed didn’t have an accent. Once they connected, they rarely looked back.

“Lou and I played music together, became best friends and then soul mates, traveled, listened to and criticized each other’s work, studied things together (butterfly hunting, meditation, kayaking),” Anderson wrote. “We made up ridiculous jokes; stopped smoking 20 times; fought; learned to hold our breath underwater; went to Africa; sang opera in elevators; made friends with unlikely people; followed each other on tour when we could; got a sweet piano-playing dog; shared a house that was separate from our own places; protected and loved each other. We were always seeing a lot of art and music and plays and shows, and I watched as he loved and appreciated other artists and musicians. He was always so generous. He knew how hard it was to do. We loved our life in the West Village and our friends; and in all, we did the best we could do.” READ FULL STORY

Patti Smith remembers Lou Reed: 'He was our generation's New York poet'

The most remarkable aspect of the cavalcade of tributes that have been written in the wake of Lou Reed’s death last weekend is that just about everybody—including his collaborators and friends—has written about him with a genuine sense of awe. That’s how powerful and influential a personality Reed was, and that’s how deeply he touched those who were closest to him.

Such is the case with Patti Smith, Reed’s sometime friend and fellow downtown denizen. In a lovely, poetic tribute published by The New Yorker, Smith talks about hearing of Reed’s passing, reflecting on New York in the ’70s, and connecting him to a long cavalcade of poets. She talks with great passion about running across Reed while she was building the Patti Smith Group. “Within a few years, in that same room upstairs at Max’s, Lenny Kaye, Richard Sohl, and I presented our own land of a thousand dances,” she wrote. “Lou would often stop by to see what we were up to. A complicated man, he encouraged our efforts, then turned and provoked me like a Machiavellian schoolboy. I would try to steer clear of him, but, catlike, he would suddenly reappear, and disarm me with some Delmore Schwartz line about love or courage. I didn’t understand his erratic behavior or the intensity of his moods, which shifted, like his speech patterns, from speedy to laconic. But I understood his devotion to poetry and the transporting quality of his performances.”

Check out the entirety Smith’s remembrance at The New Yorker, and be sure to also read the tributes by Reed’s wife Laurie Anderson and friend and collaborator Lars Ulrich.

Laurie Anderson brings 'joy' to the sad passing of Lou Reed

Since Lou Reed’s death on Sunday, posts on blogs and social networks have been going up 24/7. Many, touching accounts of how the legend’s music changed their lives. (Guilty.) Others, tearful RIP sentiments embedding favorite songs and YouTube clips eulogizing the rock iconoclast. (Guilty again.) For the lucky few, memories of The One Time They Ran Into Lou Reed; sometimes he was a total crank, sometimes he was a prince. (Sadly, none to share.)

But the best (and most anticipated) post about Lou Reed came today, and evokes what has been sorely lacking in the personal remembrances: “incredible joy.”

Writing for the East Hampton Star, Reed’s widow Laurie Anderson reminds us that Lou Reed lived a beautiful life, had one last perfect day, and that because of it, and the memories and songs he’s left us, it is indeed a “beautiful fall!”

Read Laurie Anderson’s full obituary below. Try to fight back that smile—and tear. Or don’t, actually. Just feel, as Anderson intends, the “incredible joy.”
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Metallica's Lars Ulrich on Lou Reed: 'He's the most direct, pure person I've ever met'

After Lou Reed passed away last Sunday at the age of 71, we reached out to one of his friends and collaborators, Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich, who worked with him on his last major recording project, the 2011joint album LuluHe spoke to us about his first introduction to the Velvet Underground as a kid growing up in Denmark, their first meeting at an amusement park years later, and what working with Reed was like.

“My dad had a music room across from my room in the house I grew up in in Copenhagen, Denmark. There would be all kinds of crazy stuff coming out of there from the late ‘60s and early ‘70s: Hendrix, the Doors, Miles Davis, Janis Joplin, John Coltrane, all that kind of stuff. Among the things that came out of that room at that time was the Velvet Underground. I maybe wasn’t super aware of that when I was six years old, but a few years later we moved to America and [my Dad and I] started exchanging music that we were passionate about. I would sit there and play Iron Maiden or Motorhead, and he would play me some crazy stuff. And I remember we had some pretty next-level sessions with ‘Heroin’ and ‘Sweet Jane,’ and with Rock ‘n’ Roll Animal, some of that stuff. This was the first time I sat and got into it on a different level, probably around 1980 or 1981.

So obviously that type of stuff had a tremendous impact. I wasn’t quite in tune with the cultural impact of the New York scene and what it all meant, but as a musical relationship, it was very rich, and I loved what I was hearing and I connected with what I was hearing. Some people will talk about ‘the forefather of punk music’ and all that type of stuff. I wasn’t able to put it together in that type of context at that time because I was only 16, but those were the first couple of times I experienced Lou. READ FULL STORY

Remembering Lou Reed: Why he mattered to kids like me

If Lou Reed hadn’t been Lou Reed, I probably wouldn’t be here. I don’t mean I wouldn’t be alive (I don’t think I was conceived to his music, but I definitely don’t intend to ask). But I wouldn’t be here, at this desk, in this office, writing, at Entertainment Weekly. I probably wouldn’t even be in New York — I’d be somewhere in suburban Michigan working as an accountant, or worse.

I’m not alone in this sentiment. A whole lot of folks I know, and even more people I don’t know, walk around thinking — if not explicitly, then in the back of their heads — that they wouldn’t be who they are if Lou Reed had never existed.

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Lou Reed and John Cale's 'Songs For Drella': Art's beating heart

Rock history is littered with band leaders who made game-changing contributions within the context of their groups, but struggled to make an impact on their own. For all the mind-blowing tunes he dealt out with the Rolling Stones, Mick Jagger’s solo output is pretty embarrassing, and though some of his post-Talking Heads music has been legitimately wonderful, David Byrne has never been able to replicate the Heads’ collective magic.

Not Lou Reed. His work with the Velvet Underground is rightfully heralded as legendary, but his solo career was just as powerful and inspiring. Throughout his solo run, Reed felt free to explore all sides of his personality, from the theatrical glam of Transformer to the sweet subversive pop of Coney Island Baby to the brutal drone of Berlin. Not all of his dalliances were successful—not even contrarian hipsters cop to liking the notoriously unlistenable Metal Machine Music, and his Metallica tag-team Lulu is problematic at best—but he took bold chances and hit more than he missed. READ FULL STORY

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