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Tag: Movie (41-50 of 133)

If Michael Jackson gets a planned biopic, who should play the King of Pop?

Now that the trial of Dr. Conrad Murray has reached its conclusion (he’ll be sentenced on November 29), the estate of Michael Jackson can get back to the business of flooding the market with product to keep the late King of Pop in the collective consciousness forever. The Cirque du Soleil show based on his music is currently on the road, and there are supposedly many more posthumous releases coming from Michael’s vaults.

According to Variety, the next logical piece of the puzzle has started to fall into place; MJ estate executor John Branca has started having conversations with Hollywood types about the prospect of producing a biopic based on Jackson’s life. The project is only at the “discussions” stage at the moment, so it could be years before there is a finished film (or any movement forward at all, really).

The idea of a Michael Jackson biopic raises two immediate questions. The first is: Who will play Michael? And secondly: What stages of Jackson’s life will get covered? READ FULL STORY

Rapper-actor Mos Def announces he will change his name in 2012

Following a lengthy line of rappers that have hung up their show names, rapper Mos Def says he’s definitely giving up his rhyme alias come 2012.

Last Saturday at Governors Island for Rock the Bells, where he was performing as one half of Black Star, the artist born Dante Smith revealed that he’s changing his name to Yasiin. After more than a decade in the business, though, he won’t be mad is you slip up and call him “Mos.”

“No, no, not at all,” he said to MTV. “’Mos Def’ is a name that I built and cultivated through the years… I feel that I’ve done quite a bit with that name. It’s time to expand and move on.”

By “move on,” he’s likely referring to his promising career as an actor. He’s already starred in movies like The Italian Job, Cadillac Records, and 16 Blocks. He’s also set to begin a stint on the next season of Dexter.

He’s usually credited as Mos Def during cast listings. But his several identities will soon just be that one.

“I also don’t want to have to deal with having any moniker or any separation between the self that I see and what [people refer to me as],” he continued.

At press time, his publicist wasn’t able to confirm what Mos’ full name will be after it’s changed or if he’ll simply just be Yasiin.

To varying degrees of significance, other rappers have changed their names. T.I was originally Tip, but changed his name because Q-Tip was signed to his label first. The Wu Tang Clan’s Ol’ Dirty Bastard changed up his grimy name after an epiphany of sorts to Big Baby Jesus. And Bad Boy label head Sean Combs arrived at Diddy, following Puff Daddy and P. Diddy because, well, because he felt like it.

Who’s name change do you appreciate the most? Let us know.

Read more:
Rock the Bells: Lauryn Hill, Nas, Erykah Badu and more live at NYC’s Governors Island
EW’s review of Mos Def and Talib Kweli Are Black Star

Hear the first snippet of Trent Reznor's score for 'The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo'

Remember back in the beginning of the summer when everybody got excited about Trent Reznor’s awesome new rendition of Led Zeppelin’s “Immigrant Song”with Karen O that appeared in the teaser trailer for The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo? (Just as a reminder, that trailer still rules.)

In addition to remaking classic rock songs in his own image, Reznor, along with tag-team partner Atticus Ross, is providing the score for David Fincher’s adaptation of the first book in Stieg Larsson’s ubiquitous trilogy of novels.

The film doesn’t come out until Christmas, but the flick’s official website just got a handful of updates, including character bios and, perhaps most importantly, pieces of the score.

Not surprisingly, the six-ish minutes of music (running on a loop over images of stars Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara) is pretty eerie and minimalist. Reznor and Ross’ music for The Social Network (which, if you recall, won them an Oscar, bringing Reznor half way to his EGOT) was also pretty sparse, though at first blush, the Dragon Tattoo music sounds like it borrows a bit more from Reznor’s industrial past than his previous project did.

Of course, it’s entirely possible that this is the only creepy portion of the score and the rest of the hour will be filled with variations on “Yakety Sax,” so it’s unclear as to whether or not it’s reflective of the whole score.

But considering the tone of the books (super violent and rapey) and the trailer (Fincher diving back into his Se7en-era neo-noir obsessions), we’re probably in for a deeply unsettling, diabolical treat. (Though admit it: You sort of want to hear Nine Inch Nails cover “Yakety Sax” now, don’t you?)

Read more on EW.com:
‘Girl With the Dragon Tattoo’ trailer: Still liking what you see?
Trent Reznor in talks for ‘Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter’
Trent Reznor reacts to Best Score nomination for ‘The Social Network’

Drew Barrymore talks directing Supervideo for band Best Coast and chooses her five favorite music videos -- EXCLUSIVE

Drew Barrymore latest project has taken her behind the camera once again. The actress (on screen next in February 2012’s Everybody Loves Whales) and director (2009’s Whip It) has gone behind the camera once again to helm a clip for garage-pop trio Best Coast’s single “Our Deal,” featuring young Hollywood breakouts Chloë Moretz (Let Me In) and Tyler Posey (Teen Wolf) in a dreamy homage to The Warriors and West Side Story. The 10-minute MTV Supervideo, a concept developed by the network and executive producer Kashy Khaledi, also features appearances by Alia Shawkat, Miranda Cosgrove, Donald Glover and Shailene Woodley. “I’m so inspired by music,” says Barrymore. “So many performances and emotions and feelings enable an actor on set if you play live music.” We asked the star to pick a few of her all-time favorite clips. READ FULL STORY

Pearl Jam releases trailer for Cameron Crowe-directed 'PJ20' documentary

Believe it not, Pearl Jam‘s debut album 10 celebrates its twentieth birthday this August.

Fittingly, the band and Oscar-winning director Cameron Crowe have been working on PJ20, a documentary due for release this fall.

Today they revealed its trailer, featuring rare and unseen footage of the iconic Seattle rockers and in-depth interviews with mates Eddie Vedder, Stone Gossard, and Jeff Ament among others, covering their rise to fame and subsequent rocky adjustment to the spotlight, and how they learned to soldier on as one.

Check out the trailer here:

READ FULL STORY

Danny Elfman on Tim Burton, Gus Van Sant, and why it's so hard to sing in Russian: An EW Q&A

Ever since he first laid down tracks for Tim Burton’s Pee Wee’s Big Adventure 25 years ago, composer (and erstwhile ’80s rock star) Danny Elfman has crafted scores for dozens of iconic films and television shows.

You can scarcely swing a cat without bumping up against an Elfman creation, be it the opening songs from The Simpsons and Desperate Housewives to now-legendary themes for flicks like Batman and Spider-Man.

You’ll get to hear him again in some of the biggest movies on the horizon, including Real Steel, Men In Black III and The Hunger Games, and if you’re interested in his past work, he recently released a 16 disc retrospective box set of his collaborations with Tim Burton. This week, he also just opened Cirque Du Soleil: Iris in Los Angeles. EW caught up with him recently, and he told us his memories from some of his favorite projects.

The Nightmare Before Christmas
“If I were to list my favorite collaborations with Tim [Burton], I would say number one would be The Nightmare Before Christmas. It was the purest, simplest process I had in all the years with Tim. There was less pressure, and the results came from the ability to kind of wander. We didn’t know how to start doing a musical; there was an animation crew ready to go and there was no script. So we started with the songs. And literally, he’d come over and start telling me the story.

I said, ‘Just tell me the story like you’re reading a book to a kid.’ So he’d take out some pictures and tell a little bit of the story, and as he was telling the story, I’d start to hear an idea for a song. Usually about three days later, I’d play him the song, and then he would tell me more of the story. Ten times we got together, he told me a story and I wrote the songs. When I was writing lyrics for [Oingo Boingo], I would write about abstract things or things that annoyed me. I could be bitter or facetious about something. I had never written anything where I told a story and wasn’t sarcastic in the process. It was a new experience writing lyrics for songs that were doing a complete narrative.” READ FULL STORY

Rob Zombie Q&A: Rocker and filmmaker talks Slayer tour, new movie, and the legend of Mick Jagger

Two nights ago, Rob Zombie turned the summertime volume up to 11 by kicking off his co-headlining tour with shred legends Slayer in Reading, Pennsylvania.

But the multi-talented Zombie has quite a few tentacles in a number of different pies at the moment, so when we caught up with him a few weeks ago, he ran down the seemingly ever-growing list of projects he’s currently advancing.

Entertainment Weekly: The last time we talked, you were also working on a tour and getting movie stuff together at the same time. Can we safely call you a workaholic?
Rob Zombie: I like to have a lot of projects going at once because I work in a very kind of schizophrenic manner. So if I ever get stuck on something, I can just to the next thing and the next thing. It’s kind of a blessing and a curse because at the same time, I hate working that way. I’m like “Boy, if I could just focus on one thing…” but then I’m always afraid if you’re only focusing on one thing and if the one thing falls apart, you’re like “Now what?” It’s sort of a paranoia.

You’ve played with Slayer before in the past, going back to the White Zombie days. Were you a fan before you worked with them?
I was a fan before we opened but not for long time. I was never a crazy metal fan. I saw them at the Felt Forum in New York on one of the early shows on the South of Heaven tour. That’s when I really was blown away by the show and the insane intensity of the whole thing.

Is it inspiring to you that they can still put out that kind of energy all these years later?
It’s not really inspiring to me because we’re all the same age. So I’m not inspired by that. I’m inspired if I watch the Rolling Stones. I think, “Holy f—, Mick Jagger is almost 70 and look at the energy that guy’s got.”

Is that going to be you? Will we be able to see you live at 70?
Who knows? I mean, there’s very few people that have that. Probably not, because when I’m together with all the guys from Slayer, everybody’s  just sitting around talking about how much their necks hurt. Mick Jagger is just possessed. People take for granted that they don’t even understand how great it is sometimes. Like when the Stones played the Super Bowl and everyone complained about it. Give me a f—ing break! You work that f—ing stage the size of a football field when you’re 66 years old, and we’ll see if you come out alive. It’s a phenomenon. READ FULL STORY

'God Bless Ozzy Osbourne': Check out an exclusive clip from the new rock doc and interview with director Mike Fleiss

ozzy_ozbourne_212.jpg

Mike Fleiss has one of Hollywood’s more unusual résumés.

The producer is best known for bringing us the boy(s)-meets-girl(s) reality shows The Bachelor and The Bachelorette, but he has also overseen a string of boys-and-girls-get-butchered horror movies, including Eli Roth’s two Hostel films, the rather nifty 2003 Texas Chainsaw Massacre remake, and the forthcoming Shark Night 3D. Fleiss has now added another string to his bow — or, arguably, lashed the other two together — by co-directing God Bless Ozzy Osbourne, a new documentary about the reality show star and infamous, bat-molesting, Black Sabbath-fronting metal icon.

READ FULL STORY

Cameron Crowe's Pearl Jam documentary: Watch the teaser here, and learn how they chose their name

Pearl Jam have been close with director Cameron Crowe for years (they even appeared in his 1992 movie Singles), and as part of their year-long 20th anniversary celebration—which also includes the release of deluxe reissues of Vs. and Vitalogy—Crowe is releasing a long-in-the-works documentary.

The short trailer for PJ20 (which you can watch after the jump) features vintage archival footage of the group discussing how they just changed their name to Pearl Jam. Originally, the group was called Mookie Blaylock, after a former NBA point guard (there’s even a shot of a marquee that touts Mookie Blaylock as the opening act for Alice In Chains).Legal issues forced them to change the name to Pearl Jam, and they’ve run with it ever since.

There’s a lot of terrible early ’90s fashion and plenty of goofing around in a van, which means that the film itself, scheduled to get released later this year, should reveal a lot about one of the most interesting and enduring bands in the world. Check out the brief teaser for yourself.

READ FULL STORY

'God Bless Ozzy Osbourne': New documentary presents the life, art, and addiction of the metal madman

God Bless Ozzy Osbourne, a documentary about the life and times of the Prince of Darkness, premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival this Sunday.

What could have been a glossy, fawning tribute to the most visible face in heavy metal music history—especially considering it was co-produced by his son, Jack—actually turned out to be a remarkably evenhanded look at Ozzy’s monumental musical influence as well as his less exemplary life as an addict and often-absent father.

The rock doc starts with Osbourne’s poor childhood in the cramped quarters of inner-city Birmingham, England, and goes up to his long-sought sobriety following the end of the water-cooler fodder reality series The Osbournes.

In Ozzy’s own words, “nothing really happened” in his life until he first heard the Beatles. “It was like someone had turned the world on to me,” said the Ozzman regarding his first exposure to “She Loves You.” “I knew I was going to be a rock star the rest of my life.” (Speaking of Beatles, Sir Paul is one of the numerous interviewees paying tribute to Ozzy’s impact). READ FULL STORY

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