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Tag: Music Videos (21-30 of 765)

A runaway bride stars in buzzy electro duo Phantoms' 'Broken Halo' video

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Vinnie and Kyle, the two members of LA electronic group Phantoms (who both go by their first names alone), have funky, synth-heavy music in their blood. Vinnie’s dad was a rhythm guitarist who played in funk bands back in the ’60s, and Kyle’s uncle played keys for Michael Jackson.

The pair were formerly actors, “doing TV movie work and stuff like that,” Kyle says. “As a side project, we always wanted to make music together.”

“Originally we wanted to make this funk rock group,” Vinnie adds, “and eventually it formed into this electronic project because we fell in love with the genre.” READ FULL STORY

Marina and the Diamonds sparkles in 'Froot' video

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Marina and the Diamonds’ “Froot” is full ofsurprise!fruit imagery, but the music video contains less fruit than Taylor Swift’s “Blank Space” in favor of sultry lighting and glittering gowns.

“Froot” is the first track off Marina and the Diamonds’ upcoming album, her first since 2012’s Electra Heart. In the video, the singer slinks around a regal house and even recruits some dancers clad in matching gold lamé to back her up. There are dark shadows and lots of glitter and Marina’s deep, sultry voicewhat else could you want?
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Terrace premieres 'Cote d'Azur' video

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Vancouver trio Terrace grew up in the heyday of dance music and synth disco—an era they revisit in their dreamy, danceable sound while somehow retaining a quality of timelessness. Terrace’s brand-new video for their August single, the characteristically infectious “Côte D’Azur,” embodies the band’s je ne sais quoi: It’s a sun-washed vision of the French Riviera circa the ’80s.

“As a child of the 80s, ‘Côte D’Azur’ is a tale of summer love and longing for the ultimate fantasy of life in the French Riviera,” explains frontman Simon Lock. (Fun fact: his other job is as a commercial airline pilot.) “A time and place where the sounds of Chic, Roxy Music, and Giorgio Moroder provided the soundtrack of carefree decadence,” he adds.

Especially present is the influence of Italian producer Giorgio Moroder, an early pioneer of synth disco and EDM, and Nile Rodgers, who has produced albums for David Bowie, Madonna, and Duran Duran. The imagery in the video, directed by Barcelona-based Marc Alcover, is sublime; the footage of crashing waves complements the song’s hypnotic hook, while the handheld shots of the young woman the video follows enhance the allure.

Below, watch the exclusive premiere of the video—and delight in the fact that”Côte D’Azur” is only the first in a planned trilogy of music videos from Terrace’s sophomore album, We Fall Together, dropping early next year.

Field Report goes to space in animated 'Wings' music video

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And you thought Interstellar‘s graphics were impressive.

Field Report’s “Wings” plays over images of space and spaceships in the band’s latest music video, a hypnotizing spectacle of colorful animation and haunting visuals. Between the video’s story—an astronaut journeys through space in a trip that doesn’t end so well—and the song’s atmospheric sound, the “Wings” video is an emotional five minutes that proves Field Report and animation go well together. Really well.
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Anthropomorphism runs wild in Ha the Unclear's 'Secret Lives of Furniture' video

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Everyone’s imagined at some point or another that the inanimate objects around them have some sort of sentience, an interior life and emotional landscape like people do, but that people are unable to connect with. Few, though, have followed that idea through to as bizarre a conclusion as Ha the Unclear frontman Michael Cathro has. In the latest single from the fascinatingly odd New Zealand indie pop band, he sings from the perspective of a coffee table with a perhaps-not-entirely-healthy fixation on the person whose living room it occupies. For the video the band came up with an ingenious low-budget conceit that examines the relationship between people and the furniture they own in an interesting way, as well as putting Cathro’s clever and creepy lyrics up front.

“‘Secret Lives of Furniture’ is about a coffee table who becomes infatuated with its owner and is left broken at the landfill after the owner passes away,” Cathro writes in an email. “We wanted to incorporate that anthropomorphism in the video. We spent a day walking around Mt. Eden putting up posters of missing furniture imagining that everyone’s furniture was running away because we hadn’t been treating them well enough. Maybe they had all gone underground to form a secret society and plan some kind of furniture revolt.”

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One Direction drops 'Ready to Run' single from 'Four'

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The boys of One Direction are ready to make fans all googly-eyed (again) with “Ready to Run,” the new single from their upcoming album, Four.

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'Shake It Off' gets the most intensely 1989 music video possible

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Three things that were very major in 1989 that Taylor Swift did not work into her album 1989: aerobics, Alan Thicke, and Crystal Light. Thankfully, YouTuber Thomas Jung somehow figured out that “Shake It Off” syncs up with almost eerie perfection to a routine from the 1989 Crystal Light Aerobic Championship, hosted by Alan Thicke, which was something that actually aired on television at one point.

The video’s hilarious. (Aerobics! Spandex! Floofy hair!) But there’s a poignant quality in seeing a bunch of people celebrating something that would almost immediately after seem dated and vaguely creepy. Good thing that’ll never, ever happen to our collective obsession with Taylor Swift!

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Black English taps Flaming Lips collaborator for 'Hold On' video

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L.A.’s Black English used to go by the name NO, which they changed due to it being massively confusing and un-Googleable (not to mention the fact that there’s another band called that) but gave it to their latest album, which was released at the beginning of the year. The latest single from NO is “Hold On,” and they’ve filmed a video for it with Natalie Wertzel and a gang of collaborators including Oliver Hibert, the psychedelic painter and sculptor who’s largely taken over visual identity duties for the Flaming Lips, including the cover art of their recent Sgt. Pepper’s tribute.

“The ‘Hold On’ video came about when I ran into a young lady, Natalie Wetzel, at an Echo Park cafe down my street,” writes Black English’s Bradley Carter in an email. “She was new to town and we started talking about how relationships can be so interesting in this time. You can be thousands of miles away from each other but still feel so connected, almost too much to a point that it can affect or intrude on everyone else around you if you aren’t careful.”

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It's not too late to fall in love with Sharaya J's Missy Elliott-directed 'Takin' It No More'/'Shut It Down' video

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Missy Elliott hasn’t released an album in nearly a decade. As a fan, that can be hard to deal with, especially as other rap and R&B stars of the early ’00s have mounted comebacks over the past few years. But as frustrating as the lack of a new Elliott LP has been, it’s hard to argue with the admittedly well-deserved semi-retirement she’s been enjoying, casually jumping on tracks for old friends, releasing the occasional hot new thing whenever the mood strikes her, and not really sweating career stuff.

Recently she’s taken on Jersey artist Sharaya J as a protege, performing with her at the afterparty for an Alexander Wang runway show and even making a video for her. Back at the end of September, Sharaya J released a diptych video for her songs “Takin’ It No More” and “Shut It Down,” which Elliott co-directed and executive produced. It’s Elliott’s first time directing, as she admitted last night on Twitter, but she’s obviously learned a lot from starring in videos, and the results of her debut effort are way more impressive than the average novice. It helps that Sharaya J is a superstar just waiting to happen, with intense vocal and dance skills matched by a charisma that blasts out of the screen with an almost palpable force.

She also seems to have inherited Elliott’s frenetically experimental streak—there aren’t many artists out there who have the skills or even the inclination to pull off choreography that incorporates real-time sign language translations into their dance moves.

The “Takin’ It No More”/”Shut It Down” video has been out for over a month now, and so far it’s only racked up a little over 100 thousand views, which is only a tiny fraction of what it deserves. A month may seem like a million years in today’s hyperkinetic pop landscape, but that doesn’t mean it’s too late to fall in love with it.

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Dirt Dress's 'Revelations' video is an ode to portable electronics and feral cats

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Unless you’re a potamologist, when you hear the words “Los Angeles” you probably think about hellish traffic and fantastic taco stands before you think of bodies of water. But the Los Angeles River flows right through the middle of town and provides some of the many surreal juxtapositions of car-centric urbanization and raw nature that L.A. has to offer.

In the video for Dirt Dress‘s “Revelations,” directed by artist Ben Jeans Houghton, local scenester Diva Dompe explores the river and the wildlife living around it (including a colony of feral cats) with a shimmering postpunk soundtrack on her Walkman.

Dirt Dress’s Revelations EP is out now on Future Gods.

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