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Tag: Music Videos (21-30 of 724)

The indefatigable Bob Mould releases 'The War' video

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If someone could figure out how to distill whatever it is that keeps Bob Mould at the top of his game over 30 years into his career and turn it into an energy drink, that person could easily make billions. At age 53, while all of his contemporaries from the early ’80s American underground rock scene have either called it quits or slid comfortably into nostalgia-fueled reunion tours, Mould continues to bash out loud, tuneful guitar jams that are just as good as anything he’s ever done, still puts on a killer show, and, if the video for his new single “The War” is any indication, still at least occasionally carries his own gear.

Shot by Dave Markey, director of the grunge-era-defining documentary 1991: The Year Punk Broke, the clip follows Mould and his band (comedian/Superchunk drummer Jon Wurster and indie-rock journeyman Jason Narducy) through a gig night from loading up the van to loading out of the club, bookended with a pair of more stylized scenes.

Stick around until the end for the cameo by another indie-rock notable who happens to be wearing a very sweet Robocop patch on his jean jacket. (And when you’re done with that, go watch Mould and the rest of his first band Hüsker Dü being interviewed by Joan Rivers in 1987.)

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Watch Una Lux's 'Simon' video, where Caravaggio meets Portishead

NYC-based four-piece Una Lux are a more aesthetically ambitious group than the average indie band, as likely to throw around references to Baroque painters and avant-garde film directors as they are to Pink Floyd and Portishead. The group’s guitarist Matteo Liberatore, who directed the video for their new single “Simon,” says that the clip “is filled with homage. We tried to reference Vittorio Storaro’s use of lighting in ‘The Last Emperor,’ some of the poses in Caravaggio portraits, and the parapsychology of David Lynch’s films, and then we cut it like French New Wave.” The finished product’s studied arrangements of bodies and light are both formal and faintly surreal, making it a fitting match for a song that balances sequenced electronic sounds with singer Kelso Norris’ sensuous vocals.

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Christian Gregory's 'Won't Get Nowhere' video: a soul-drenched slugfest

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The number of new artists working in the style of classic soul musicians like Marvin Gaye and Bill Withers has reached the point where we can safely call it a deluge, but British singer Christian Gregory sets himself apart with a knack for graceful, clean-lined melodies that’s considerably tougher to learn than how to dial in a convincingly vintage-sounding electric piano part. His new single “Won’t Get Nowhere” is chicly minimalist, but some bold application of delay effects gives it an intriguingly spacey quality and a slightly chilly feel that contrasts with its comforting soul hooks. For such a mellow song, the pugilistic theme of its video might seem jarring, but Gregory—an avid muay thai fighter—is adept at finding compelling contrasts.

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Watch hip-hop vets DJ Nu-Mark and Slimkid3's 'I Know, Didn't I' video

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From Kendrick Lamar to YG, the West Coast has been working steadily to reassert its status as one of the epicenters of hip-hop culture, and two veterans of the scene have stepped up to contribute to the effort. DJ Nu-Mark of Jurassic 5 and the Pharcyde’s Slimkid3 have teamed up for an album-length collaboration, Slimkid3 & DJ Nu-Mark, that comes out next Tuesday on old-school standard-bearer Delicious Vinyl.

The second single from the LP puts their classical aesthetic front and center by flipping Darondo’s cult soul classic “Didn’t I” into a laid-back jam perfectly tuned for aimlessly cruising around L.A. in a sweet vintage ride, complimented by a trippy video that should connect with Cali’s current crop of dispensary-frequenting hip-hop heads.

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Watch Buck 65 play pop star in his 'Super Pretty Naughty' video

Rapper Buck 65 has made his name on dense wordplay and music that pushes against expectations of how hip-hop should sound. Choosing to concentrate on abstract metaphors and dropping odd country-rap fusions years before “hick-hop” became a thing has kept him closer to cult status than mainstream success, but for his latest song and video, from his upcoming album Neverlove (out Sept. 30), Buck offers a glimpse at what might have been if he’d pursued a more pop-friendly route.

“After my wife left,” he writes in an email, “I met a girl who I was hoping would give me hugs and kisses. I was a bit desperate for affection. I figured I might get lucky if I made a song she liked, so I asked her about her taste in music. She listed off all the things she likes about the music she dances to in clubs and I wrote it all down. I still have the piece of paper. She mentioned lyrics with ‘la la la’ parts, four-on-the-floor beats, classic house music, mentions of birthdays and getting dressed up, ‘build ups,’ as she put it, shiny synth sounds, breakdowns, ‘rainbows’ (I wasn’t sure what she meant by that), and lots of hooks. It all went into the blender.”

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Allah-Las get a psychedelic handmade video for 'Buffalo Nickel'

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LA’s Allah-Las are one of the few bands in existence that can come off as brain-meltingly psychedelic and totally chill at the exact same time. With the jangly guitars and vocal harmonies of a ’60s folk rock group and the hippie-fied, mind-expanding quality of a Carlos Castaneda book, they’ve spent the past few years instigating a cosmic takeover of the underground garage rock scene.

Their latest single, “Buffalo Nickel,” from their upcoming sophomore album Worship the Sun (out Sept. 16 on Innovative Leisure), is a fantastic place to jump on their trip. The video, made using the same handmade stop-motion techniques that were popular 50 years ago, makes a perfect accompaniment to the song’s slightly rough-hewn psychedelia.

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Grimes visits Dante's 'Inferno' in 'Go' music video

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Grimes’ music video for “Go” begins with David Hayter, a voice actor known for his work in X-Men and the Metal Gear Solid video games, reciting the opening lines of Dante’s Inferno in a gravelly voice: “Midway upon the journey of our life, I found myself within a forest dark…”

And from that moment on, viewers are in Grimes’ version of hell.
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Delta Spirit debut their sweeping video for 'From Now On'

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Delta Spirit have a talent for recreating the feel of classic rock styles–particularly the more psychedelic ones–without sticking too closely to their aesthetic playbooks, which is a remarkable quality in a rock scene that often seems to have traded innovation for making the most accurate emulations possible of sounds from the genre’s past. The lead single from their upcoming fourth album, Into the Wide (out Sept. 9 on Dualtone Records), has a widescreen scope but is still packed with hooks, especially in the searing bent-note lead that soars over the composition.

For the video, director Andrew Bruntel goes for a similarly epic sweep, with a disparate cast of characters living very diferent lives on the prairies of southeastern Colorado. “If I could parse it down to one simple theme,” he writes, “it would be vulnerability. Vulnerability in friendships, in our relationships with family and with the pets/animals that we allow into our lives.” It’s gorgeous and triumphant and sad all at the same time, much like the song itself.

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Watch a moody video for Trentemoller's 'Come Undone' remix

Anders Trentemøller is a Danish electronic musician who’s known for blending cutting-edge electronic production with dark and moody post-punk, resulting in tracks that can make a grown-up goth kid weak in the knees. For his last album, Lost, he took a more indie-friendly approach, collaborating with members of Lower Dens, Low, and the Raveonettes. On Sept. 1, he’ll release a set of remixes of Lost songs, including his own reworking of “Come Undone” featuring vocals by Kazu Makino of Blonde Redhead. The accompanying video, by director Andreas Emenius, pairs the track’s shimmering electro-funk with greyscale footage of a diver in slow motion, creating a moody, nearly abstract juxtaposition that the old Factory Records creative team would have been proud of.

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Nicki, Ariana, and Jessie J dance on a skyscraper in 'Bang Bang' video

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Right after Nicki Minaj, Jessie J, and Ariana Grande opened Sunday’s MTV Video Music Awards with a performance of “Bang Bang,” MTV premiered the trio’s wardrobe malfunction-free video for the song online.

The video begins with men ogling at Jessie J as she exits a car, but she pays it no mind and enlists female onlookers to join her in showing off their Cadillac-like booties. Meanwhile, Grande twirls around in a Miami-chic bedroom, applies makeup, and belts into a megaphone—A-plus on the multitasking, Grande.
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