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Tag: Music Videos (41-50 of 750)

Norman Reedus co-stars in Tricky's new 'Sun Down' video

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At the beginning of his career, Tricky’s moody, murky trip-hop hinted at a near future where humans would become kinkily intertwined with technology and increasingly alienated from each other. The past 20 years have more or less lived up to his predictions, while at the same time his lushly minimal electro-organic compositions have become crucial building blocks for the sound of contemporary hip-hop, R&B, and pop.

Most artists who are ahead of their time in their youth tend to fall behind the times as they age, but Tricky continues to release albums that can easily stand up next to zeitgeist-nabbing early works like Maxinquaye. His recently released Adrian Thaws offers plenty of proof that he’s still one of the best there is at making darkly brooding avant-rap, including the narcotic lead single “Sun Down.” The track features a vocal contribution from the up and coming artist Tirzah—and the video features Walking Dead fan favorite Norman Reedus as Tricky’s co-star.

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An unlikely gang parties hard in Sneakout's 'The Art of Hanging On' video

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As a wise man once said, “Parents just don’t understand.” Grandparents can be another story. Like if your parents are fun-hating control freaks, they might round up a pack of fellow old folks and head out into the streets of L.A. for a night of mischief and kid-friendly partying, perhaps picking up some hot friends along the way.

That’s the lesson of the video for “The Art of Hanging On” by L.A. artist Robert Fleming, a.k.a. Sneakout, who you may have recently heard on Girls. Directed by Andrew Hines, who’s also shot for A$AP Ferg and The Head and The Heart, the clip gives a comedic spin to Fleming’s psychedelically embellished, New Wave-inflected electro-rock. The song’s available on Fleming’s new Letting Go mixtape. If you’re in L.A., you can catch him opening for EW favorite Lowell at Bootleg HiFi on Sept. 22.

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Danny Brown has a psychedelic house party in 'Smokin' & Drinkin' video

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Back in July, EW visited the Greenpoint, Brooklyn location where Detroit rapper Danny Brown was shooting a video for the Old track “Smokin’ & Drinkin’.” Wednesday, the final product hit the Internet in all its hedonistic glory.

Director Alan Del Rio Ortiz described the clip’s theme as “like a house party, but in a dream,” and to that end, he dropped Brown (clad in a leather jacket and Dead Boys tee) into a group of pretty young people going bananas in a psychedelically lit apartment. There’s a lot of dancing, a lot of glitter, a lot of 40’s being chugged, and since it’s a rap video, a generous number of attractive women just chilling in a shower.

Thundercat and Eric Andre just made the most demented music video of the year

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 JASH, the YouTube comedy channel founded by Sarah Silverman, Tim & Eric, Michael Cera, and a bunch of other just-left-of-mainstream funny types, has a subsidiary called Buh, where stuff that’s even weirder than the weird stuff on JASH gets filed. One of the regular features there is called “$5,000 Video” where a comedian and a rapper are, as you probably guessed, are given $5,000 to make a music video. (Maybe you saw the one with Hannibal Buress and Chance the Rapper.)

The latest installment pairs Eric Andre Show and Don’t Trust the B—- in Apt. 23 star Eric Andre with Thundercat, who’s not actually a rapper but whose association with Flying Lotus’ Brainfeeder crew puts him in close proximity to the LA avant-garde rap scene. The track they chose is “Tron Song,” from Thundercat’s 2013 solo album Apocalypse, where he trades in his usual frenetic bass freakouts for a tender psychedelic soul ballad about his cat. Filtering the cat theme through Andre’s distinctive lo-fi surreal visual aesthetic–where glitchy psychedelia occasionally gets uncomfortably close to “bad trip” territory–results in a clip full of VHS-era video effects, deviant sex acts, and defecation in a human-sized litter box, along with a few cameos by the titular cat where he looks just as confused by what’s going on as anyone watching.

At a time where the plethora of music videos on YouTube has made shock value a close second behind gratuitous nudity as a method of attracting viewers, the “Tron Song” clip manages to stand out as particularly demented. Bravo, gentlemen.

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La Roux is an infomercial star in 'Kiss and Not Tell' video

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La Roux is bringing the hamburger phone back. In the music video for “Kiss and Not Tell,” La Roux’s Elly Jackson stars in an ’80s-style infomercial as callers chat on playful telephones, ranging from the classic hamburger to colorful rotary phones.

And that phone number in the faux infomercial? It’s real: Call the number and Jackson will urge you to “press 1 to get down,” which will lead you to a recording of “Kiss and Not Tell,” or “press 2 to leave a cheeky message.” If only all infomercials were this fun. READ FULL STORY

Zulu Pearls hang with Swedish car freaks in their 'Lightweight' video

When some people think about Sweden and automobiles, they think of clean-cut blondes driving Volvos. But since the dawn of hot-rod culture in the U.S., there’s been a subculture in Sweden that’s been bound together by their mutual worship of tail-finned American steel, cheap beer, and rock ‘n’ roll. Known as “raggare,” they throw a hefty, fuel-inefficient monkey wrench in the popular preconception of Swedes as the neatest and most polite people in the world, and they seem like they have a blast doing it.

For the video for their new single “Lightweight,” Berlin-based rock group Zulu Pearls’ creative mastermind Zach Van Hoozer traveled to Sweden to hang out with the raggare gang Moonshine Cruisers and caught the experience on film. The result creates an interesting juxtaposition of sugary retro-rock sounds and pastoral images of grizzled hot rodders shotgunning beers.

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The indefatigable Bob Mould releases 'The War' video

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If someone could figure out how to distill whatever it is that keeps Bob Mould at the top of his game over 30 years into his career and turn it into an energy drink, that person could easily make billions. At age 53, while all of his contemporaries from the early ’80s American underground rock scene have either called it quits or slid comfortably into nostalgia-fueled reunion tours, Mould continues to bash out loud, tuneful guitar jams that are just as good as anything he’s ever done, still puts on a killer show, and, if the video for his new single “The War” is any indication, still at least occasionally carries his own gear.

Shot by Dave Markey, director of the grunge-era-defining documentary 1991: The Year Punk Broke, the clip follows Mould and his band (comedian/Superchunk drummer Jon Wurster and indie-rock journeyman Jason Narducy) through a gig night from loading up the van to loading out of the club, bookended with a pair of more stylized scenes.

Stick around until the end for the cameo by another indie-rock notable who happens to be wearing a very sweet Robocop patch on his jean jacket. (And when you’re done with that, go watch Mould and the rest of his first band Hüsker Dü being interviewed by Joan Rivers in 1987.)

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Watch Una Lux's 'Simon' video, where Caravaggio meets Portishead

NYC-based four-piece Una Lux are a more aesthetically ambitious group than the average indie band, as likely to throw around references to Baroque painters and avant-garde film directors as they are to Pink Floyd and Portishead. The group’s guitarist Matteo Liberatore, who directed the video for their new single “Simon,” says that the clip “is filled with homage. We tried to reference Vittorio Storaro’s use of lighting in ‘The Last Emperor,’ some of the poses in Caravaggio portraits, and the parapsychology of David Lynch’s films, and then we cut it like French New Wave.” The finished product’s studied arrangements of bodies and light are both formal and faintly surreal, making it a fitting match for a song that balances sequenced electronic sounds with singer Kelso Norris’ sensuous vocals.

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Christian Gregory's 'Won't Get Nowhere' video: a soul-drenched slugfest

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The number of new artists working in the style of classic soul musicians like Marvin Gaye and Bill Withers has reached the point where we can safely call it a deluge, but British singer Christian Gregory sets himself apart with a knack for graceful, clean-lined melodies that’s considerably tougher to learn than how to dial in a convincingly vintage-sounding electric piano part. His new single “Won’t Get Nowhere” is chicly minimalist, but some bold application of delay effects gives it an intriguingly spacey quality and a slightly chilly feel that contrasts with its comforting soul hooks. For such a mellow song, the pugilistic theme of its video might seem jarring, but Gregory—an avid muay thai fighter—is adept at finding compelling contrasts.

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Watch hip-hop vets DJ Nu-Mark and Slimkid3's 'I Know, Didn't I' video

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From Kendrick Lamar to YG, the West Coast has been working steadily to reassert its status as one of the epicenters of hip-hop culture, and two veterans of the scene have stepped up to contribute to the effort. DJ Nu-Mark of Jurassic 5 and the Pharcyde’s Slimkid3 have teamed up for an album-length collaboration, Slimkid3 & DJ Nu-Mark, that comes out next Tuesday on old-school standard-bearer Delicious Vinyl.

The second single from the LP puts their classical aesthetic front and center by flipping Darondo’s cult soul classic “Didn’t I” into a laid-back jam perfectly tuned for aimlessly cruising around L.A. in a sweet vintage ride, complimented by a trippy video that should connect with Cali’s current crop of dispensary-frequenting hip-hop heads.

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