The Music Mix Music news, reviews, albums, concerts, and downloads

Tag: New Stuff (1-10 of 1118)

Reviewing Thom Yorke's 'Tomorrow's Modern Boxes': A surprise delivery -- and a pretty great one

On Friday, Radiohead frontman and dance enthusiast Thom Yorke snuck up on the Internet and delivered another sonic sucker punch. Not only did he announce that he had completed a new solo album called Tomorrow’s Modern Boxes, but that said album was already available via BitTorrent.

For a nominal fee of $6, hardcore fans were entitled to download a bundle that included all eight of the album’s tracks plus the unnerving music video for the track “A Brain in a Bottle”: READ FULL STORY

Andre Benjamin on Jimi Hendrix, OutKast, and what's next

ALL-IS-BY-MY-SIDE-clip.jpg

The André Benjamin drought is over. After a long break from the spotlight, the man also known as Andre 3000 not only launched a headline-making reunion tour with his formative rap duo this ­summer but also stars in the excellent Hendrix biopic Jimi: All Is by My Side, written and directed by Oscar-winning 12 Years a Slave screenwriter John Ridley. Thoughtful and forthcoming, Benjamin, 39, spoke via phone from his home in Atlanta about the evolution of Jimi and what takes to be true to the parts he plays both on stage and off.

EW: You’ve been trying to play Jimi Hendrix for a while. What drew you into this script?
André Benjamin: The take that John Ridley devised. I’ve been kind of close to or attached to a few different Hendrix projects over the years. 15 years ago, I started hearing the Hendrix calls from different directors and producers. I’ve read about four or five different scripts—great scripts, at that—but for some reason or another they just didn’t get made. When John Ridley came with this take, years later I’m like, “Wow, I’m pretty old at this point, but if you still feel like it can work…” And John was really, really into it. The first thing he said was, “I’m going to make this movie, and I want you to be in it.” I was just going off of John’s energy. READ FULL STORY

Taylor McFerrin's psych-soul single 'The Antidote' gets a trippy video

taylor-mcferrin.jpg

Producer/composer/pianist Taylor McFerrin is the rare member of the Flying Lotus-led Brainfeeder collective to operate out of New York City rather than L.A., but the influence of vintage soul, psychedelic jazz, and Golden Age rap beats on his music is right in line with the crew’s aesthetic mission statement. His debut album, Early Riser, which came out on Brainfeeder earlier this summer, features a fascinating cast of special guests including Brainfeeder bass master Thundercat, pianist Robert Glasper, Brazilian jazz veteran Cesar Camargo Mariano, and McFerrin’s dad Bobby. For the lead single “The Antidote” he teamed up with Hiatus Kaiyote vocalist Nai Palm and created a psych-soul cut wrapped in the warm and captivatingly complex textures that he specializes in. Its trippy black-and-white animated video was made by director Simon Benjamin, who also drew Early Riser‘s cover.

READ FULL STORY

Norman Reedus co-stars in Tricky's new 'Sun Down' video

tricky-norman-reedus

At the beginning of his career, Tricky’s moody, murky trip-hop hinted at a near future where humans would become kinkily intertwined with technology and increasingly alienated from each other. The past 20 years have more or less lived up to his predictions, while at the same time his lushly minimal electro-organic compositions have become crucial building blocks for the sound of contemporary hip-hop, R&B, and pop.

Most artists who are ahead of their time in their youth tend to fall behind the times as they age, but Tricky continues to release albums that can easily stand up next to zeitgeist-nabbing early works like Maxinquaye. His recently released Adrian Thaws offers plenty of proof that he’s still one of the best there is at making darkly brooding avant-rap, including the narcotic lead single “Sun Down.” The track features a vocal contribution from the up and coming artist Tirzah—and the video features Walking Dead fan favorite Norman Reedus as Tricky’s co-star.

READ FULL STORY

Dawn Landes does karaoke 'Lost In Translation'-style in 'More Than This' video

Louisville-born singer-songwriter Dawn Landes has racked up an impressive number of accomplishments over the course of her still young career: recording with Will Oldham and Justin Townes Earle, touring with Feist and Andrew Bird, accompanying the New York City Ballet at the Lincoln Center, working at Philip Glass’ personal studio. Now she can add “coming up with the funniest riff on Lost in Translation‘s karaoke scene for a music video” to the list.

Sunday night Landes kicked off a tour as opening act for former Roxy Music frontman Bryan Ferry, and on Tuesday, she self-releases her Covers EP (recorded with her band the Kentuckians), which includes her lilting, countrified version of Roxy’s “More Than This,” alongside classics by the likes of Bruce Springsteen and Henry Mancini. For the video she created a shot-by-shot reproduction of Lost in Translation‘s most memorable moment, cleverly playing both Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson’s roles. That’s what you call versatility.

READ FULL STORY

Chief Keef's 'Wait': Weirdest rap song of the week (or maybe the year)

Two years after blasting his way into the pop zeitgeist via Kanye’s remix of “I Don’t Like,” Chief Keef remains the poster boy for Chicago’s drill scene, despite the fact that he’s been moving away from that style’s blueprint for nearly as long. Earlier this year, he released the single “All I Care About” from his Bang 3 mixtape that split the difference between drill and the blues, mixing a twitchy beat made out of drill’s signature chattering hi-hats and funereal tolling bells with a yowling Auto-Tuned vocal part and a hypnotically circular melody, resulting in six minutes of heavy strangeness that doesn’t fit comfortably in any one established genre. (“Computerized gangster soul” might work.)

Last night he proved that his weird streak’s not only continuing, but intensifying when he posted a new single on YouTube. “Wait,” which Keef produced himself, is a strange mishmash of odd noises that shares some rhythmic qualities with rap but overall is more sonically similar to the experimental electronic music that back in the ’90s was called IDM, or “intelligent dance music”—in particular in its glitchy hi-hats and the unexpectedly gentle synth lead that sounds like something Aphex Twin might have made back in the Richard D. James Album era.

READ FULL STORY

Music supervisor for 'Revenge,' 'Arrow,' and 'The Fault In Our Stars' makes us a fall TV playlist

season-kent

The most important movie soundtrack this year was undoubtedly the top-shelf compilation put together by Season Kent for The Fault In Our Stars, and not just because it gave us Charli XCX’s inimitable “Boom Clap.” Kent has quickly become one of the go-to names in music supervision, and though she’s working on more and more film projects (she just got started working on the Magic Mike sequel), she has primarily made her bones on television.

This season, she returns to both Arrow and Revenge, and adds the brand new Arrow spin-off The Flash to her portfolio. In an effort to give our Shazam apps a rest during the forthcoming TV season, we asked Kent to make us a playlist of songs that we’ll eventually be hearing under our favorite dramatic moments and montages. Check out her picks and listen to the Spotify playlist below.

READ FULL STORY

Love it or loathe it? Two EW critics debate U2's new album 'Songs of Innocence'

u2

Yesterday, U2—easily the biggest rock band left on the planet—surprised everyone when they released their long-in-gestation new album for free.

Songs of Innocence was made available to everybody with an iTunes account, which allows most everybody who listens to digital music to hear it; a physical version will be out on October 14, at which point it will be eligible to chart.

After a solid 12 hours of digesting the record — their first since 2010’s generally disappointing No Line on the Horizon — EW music experts Kyle Anderson and Miles Raymer fired up their e-mail machines, and their critical judgment.  READ FULL STORY

Nick Cave talks to EW about his new movie '20,000 Days on Earth' and why he doesn't like meeting his heroes

Over the course of a nearly four-decade music career, Nick Cave has been one of music’s most reliably inscrutable rock stars. The forthcoming documentary 20,000 Days on Earth (in theaters September 19) does a bit to shed some light on Cave’s dark spirit, but it does it with a twist.

Although many of the day-in-the-life conversations aren’t scripted (or very loosely so), and everybody in Cave’s life—from bandmate Warren Ellis to former Bad Seed Blixa Bargeld to Kylie Minogue—plays him- or herself, a lot of the film is built on artifice. The office where Cave undergoes a therapy session, the “archive” where he goes to review old photographs—they’re all built sets and faked scenarios, and constructed to try to wring some truth out of something inherently fake.

20,000 Days on Earth splits its time between those scenes and in-the-studio footage from the sessions that led to Push the Sky Away, Cave’s 2013 record with the Bad Seeds. It’s a remarkable movie, existing in the unique dimension between fiction and reality straddled by filmmaking greats like Werner Herzog and Errol Morris: READ FULL STORY

Zulu Pearls hang with Swedish car freaks in their 'Lightweight' video

When some people think about Sweden and automobiles, they think of clean-cut blondes driving Volvos. But since the dawn of hot-rod culture in the U.S., there’s been a subculture in Sweden that’s been bound together by their mutual worship of tail-finned American steel, cheap beer, and rock ‘n’ roll. Known as “raggare,” they throw a hefty, fuel-inefficient monkey wrench in the popular preconception of Swedes as the neatest and most polite people in the world, and they seem like they have a blast doing it.

For the video for their new single “Lightweight,” Berlin-based rock group Zulu Pearls’ creative mastermind Zach Van Hoozer traveled to Sweden to hang out with the raggare gang Moonshine Cruisers and caught the experience on film. The result creates an interesting juxtaposition of sugary retro-rock sounds and pastoral images of grizzled hot rodders shotgunning beers.

READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Music

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP