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Tag: New Stuff (11-20 of 1155)

Let BJ the Chicago Kid help you forget about that terrible Aaliyah biopic

Even as she’s grown into one of the most influential forces in modern pop music (just check the number of people walking around with baby hair and a SoundCloud full of atmospheric future-funk beats), Aaliyah’s suffered a depressing number of indignities since her death in 2001, from less-than-stellar posthumous albums to being press-ganged into a Chris Brown song. But the worst so far is the biopic that Lifetime just aired, which ignored her artistry in favor of focusing on her romantic relationships and portrayed her illegal underage marriage to R. Kelly as a Romeo and Juliet story rather than statutory rape.

Aaliyah fans are intensely upset about the movie, and they haven’t been shy about expressing it. Which is why it’s a good time for rising crooner BJ the Chicago Kid to release his own version of the Baby Girl classic “One in a Million” where he doesn’t try to do anything fancy or weird with it but simply sings a very good song the way it was meant to be sung. It’s an effective way of washing the Lifetime movie’s bad vibes out of your brain.

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Pusha T drops Kanye West-produced 'Lunch Money'

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It’s a testament to Pusha T’s magnetism that he can rap about exactly one topic and still get people going crazy every time he drops a track. He just unveiled his latest, the Kanye West-produced “Lunch Money,” and like every single other King Push song ever, it’s about the craziness of being a former cocaine dealer turned international rap superstar, and like an almost unbelievably large percentage of them, it’s completely bananas and worth rewinding at least two or three times on the first spin.

West’s beat hints at where he’s headed post-Yeezus, trading in the impenetrably dark industrial minimalism he’s been on for burbling prog rock synthesizers and funky stomping drums. The track hit the Internets without any explanation about whether or not it’s part of a new release, but if Pusha’s got a sequel to My Name Is My Name up his sleeve, fans of clanging beats and a seemingly limitless series of cocaine metaphors could have reason to celebrate.

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Terrace premieres 'Cote d'Azur' video

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Vancouver trio Terrace grew up in the heyday of dance music and synth disco—an era they revisit in their dreamy, danceable sound while somehow retaining a quality of timelessness. Terrace’s brand-new video for their August single, the characteristically infectious “Côte D’Azur,” embodies the band’s je ne sais quoi: It’s a sun-washed vision of the French Riviera circa the ’80s.

“As a child of the 80s, ‘Côte D’Azur’ is a tale of summer love and longing for the ultimate fantasy of life in the French Riviera,” explains frontman Simon Lock. (Fun fact: his other job is as a commercial airline pilot.) “A time and place where the sounds of Chic, Roxy Music, and Giorgio Moroder provided the soundtrack of carefree decadence,” he adds.

Especially present is the influence of Italian producer Giorgio Moroder, an early pioneer of synth disco and EDM, and Nile Rodgers, who has produced albums for David Bowie, Madonna, and Duran Duran. The imagery in the video, directed by Barcelona-based Marc Alcover, is sublime; the footage of crashing waves complements the song’s hypnotic hook, while the handheld shots of the young woman the video follows enhance the allure.

Below, watch the exclusive premiere of the video—and delight in the fact that”Côte D’Azur” is only the first in a planned trilogy of music videos from Terrace’s sophomore album, We Fall Together, dropping early next year.

Inside Light in the Attic Records, the vinyl-loving crate-digger's favorite label

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In 1968, Barbara Lynn was riding high. A gifted young blues guitarist and songwriter whose compositions had already been covered by Otis Redding and the Rolling Stones, the Beaumont, Tex., native had just signed with Atlantic Records to release her major-label debut, Here Is Barbara Lynn. Though it spawned the radio hit “You’ll Lose a Good Thing” and landed her an extended tour with B.B. King, it wasn’t the success Atlantic had hoped for. By the mid-1970s, a disillusioned Lynn had mostly withdrawn from the industry to raise her family—and Here was essentially lost to history.

Fast-forward four decades, and cue the entrance of Matt Sullivan. In 2002 the then-26-year-old founded Light in the Attic Records, a label whose raison d’être is resurrecting forgotten classics for a new generation of vinyl fetishists and crate diggers. “When they called, I was amazed,” says Lynn, now 72, via phone from her Beaumont home. “I feel so good about these songs. I didn’t think anybody was still thinking about me.”

Here Is Barbara Lynn is the latest in a series of some 150 eclectic reissues put out by the Seattle-bred boutique label. READ FULL STORY

Black English taps Flaming Lips collaborator for 'Hold On' video

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L.A.’s Black English used to go by the name NO, which they changed due to it being massively confusing and un-Googleable (not to mention the fact that there’s another band called that) but gave it to their latest album, which was released at the beginning of the year. The latest single from NO is “Hold On,” and they’ve filmed a video for it with Natalie Wertzel and a gang of collaborators including Oliver Hibert, the psychedelic painter and sculptor who’s largely taken over visual identity duties for the Flaming Lips, including the cover art of their recent Sgt. Pepper’s tribute.

“The ‘Hold On’ video came about when I ran into a young lady, Natalie Wetzel, at an Echo Park cafe down my street,” writes Black English’s Bradley Carter in an email. “She was new to town and we started talking about how relationships can be so interesting in this time. You can be thousands of miles away from each other but still feel so connected, almost too much to a point that it can affect or intrude on everyone else around you if you aren’t careful.”

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Why fajitas sizzle and five more fun facts from the new book 'The Sonic Boom: How Sound Transforms The Way We Think, Feel, and Buy'

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Joel Beckerman is a master at sonic branding—the art of using not just music but all kinds of sounds to influence consumers. As the founder of Man Mad Music, he’s responsible for the company whose “sonic logos” include the four-tone signature that AT&T uses, the HBO original programming music, and the NBC Nightly News theme.

His new book The Sonic Boom: How Sound Transforms The Way We Think, Feel, and Buy (co-written with Edelman editorial director Tyler Gray)  is equal parts sociological study and business advice, using unique everyday examples– for instance, how the fate of the Chili’s fajita empire rested on the sound of the sizzling platter, and how Disneyland approaches soundscapes for a fully immersive experience–  to explain how sound effects our mood and shopping habits.

Below are five of the most fascinating case studies from the book:

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The Dirty Heads' Jared 'Dirty J' Watson on the hit 'My Sweet Summer' and his current rider obsession

The fall chill is in full effect for the parts of the United States that actually experience seasons, but for anybody wanting to hang onto the spirit of beach weather, the Dirty Heads have a pretty excellent balm. It’s called “My Sweet Summer,” and it has been a steady performer on the rock charts since the album it came from, Sound of Change, dropped in July.

“We knew coming out in the summer time it would work, and it turns out it works when it’s cold too,” explains frontman Jared “Dirty J” Watson. “It’s got legs.” According to Watson, the song was initially something he was going to give away. “I heard Kenny Chesney liked our music, so I wrote the hook and was going to send it to him just to see if he’d like it,” he says. “But [producer] Niles [Hollowell-Dhar] said, ‘This is a hit, you’ve got to release this first.’ We ended up finishing it in about a day.”

The song is an excellent bridge track for the Dirty Heads, who made their bones as a reggae-blessed beach-ska hybrid since their inception. “My Sweet Summer” has a lot of that vibe to it, but it also hints at what’s on the rest of Sound of Change, which is much more heavily invested in bringing in hip-hop elements. READ FULL STORY

Dirt Dress's 'Revelations' video is an ode to portable electronics and feral cats

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Unless you’re a potamologist, when you hear the words “Los Angeles” you probably think about hellish traffic and fantastic taco stands before you think of bodies of water. But the Los Angeles River flows right through the middle of town and provides some of the many surreal juxtapositions of car-centric urbanization and raw nature that L.A. has to offer.

In the video for Dirt Dress‘s “Revelations,” directed by artist Ben Jeans Houghton, local scenester Diva Dompe explores the river and the wildlife living around it (including a colony of feral cats) with a shimmering postpunk soundtrack on her Walkman.

Dirt Dress’s Revelations EP is out now on Future Gods.

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Wild Smiles' 'Another Year Older' is a slice of grunge-pop heaven

There are a lot of bands trying to do the ’90s thing right now, but few do it as effectively or efficiently as Winchester, England’s Wild Smiles.

Their new single “Another Year Older” skillfully jams together a handful of distinct alt-rock styles from the time, from grunge to Britpop to shoegaze, into one four-minute mass of post-adolescent angst and heroically distorted guitars.

If EW‘s endorsement’s not enough for you, consider the fact that Portishead’s Geoff Barrow is not only a fan of the band but even released their first EP on his own label. And that guy’s a certified genius.

Their new album Always Tomorrow is out today.

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TWICEYOUNG gives off dreamy electro vibes on 'Stay the Same'

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Nashville trio TWICEYOUNG has the chiming guitars and sweet hooks of an indie rock band, the synthesized sounds of an electronic project, and a sweeping cinematic sensibility that’s probably making film and TV music supervisors exceptionally happy.

Their new EP Prefer You drops on Nov. 11 and with the frequency that they’ve been appearing on music blogs it already seems destined to be a cult sensation, if not something bigger. In the lead-up to its release, they’re sharing “Stay the Same,” a cool blend of postpunk and dream pop that sounds like the slightly more gothed-out cousin of Drive soundtrack sensations Electric Youth.

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