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Tag: New Stuff (11-20 of 1102)

Nicki Minaj's 'Anaconda' sneaks online

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Nicki Minaj has been spending the summer casually stealing songs out from under everyone, from virally popular underground rappers to chart-topping pop starlets. For her latest and most audacious trick, she’s flipped Sir Mix-A-Lot’s enduring classic “Baby Got Back” into “Anaconda,” a swan dive back into the gleeful raunchiness of her early mixtape days.

A very, very low quality rip of the song leaked online last night (it’ll be officially released on August 5)—and while it may sound terrible, you can at least hear Nicki turning the tables on Mix-A-Lot’s original, taking on the role of the big-bootied girl who actually wields the power in the situation. She also makes some comparisons between the male anatomy and certain famously phallic French architectural landmarks. With its unbridled lewdness, the song doesn’t seem likely to become a standard at wedding receptions in the foreseeable future—but you probably could have said the same thing about “Baby Got Back” in 1992. READ FULL STORY

Hear Brooklynn's disco-fied new single 'Wild Game'

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Despite what her name might suggest, the pop singer Brooklynn is based out of Atlanta, where she’s been developing a musical identity that pulls from a respectably diverse range of influences—Johnny Cash, Madonna, Guns N’ Roses, and Howlin’ Wolf among them. Working with Lady Gaga’s former musical director, Nico Constantine, she’s recorded an EP that comes out later this fall. It features one song, “Wild Game,” that sounds like Emotional Rescue-era Stones fronted by Donna Summer, which is a pretty seriously great thing to sound like.

Watch Katy Perry's pop-art video for 'This Is How We Do'

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In a new Rolling Stone interview, Katy Perry complains about being accused of cultural appropriation—thanks to the big-bootied mummy dancers on her recent tour and the geisha outfit she wore at the American Music Awards. From now on, she says (presumably no small amount of sarcasm), “I guess I’ll just stick to baseball and hot dogs, and that’s it.”

Neither baseball nor hot dogs appear in the video she just dropped for her YOLO anthem “This Is How We Do.” There are, however, plenty of vivid colors and retro styling that references the early days of pop art, not to mention pizza and watermelon. She also rocks a “ratchet” getup with cornrows and a friend listed in her phone as a “thot…” so those cultural appropriation charges will probably keep rolling in. READ FULL STORY

Azealia Banks releases first single since splitting from label

Rapper Azealia Banks has spent more time over the past couple years starting Internet beefs than putting out music, but after her recent split with Universal Music Group she seems to be turning that around. Yesterday she released her first new song as a lead artist in nearly a year, and she didn’t insult anyone on Twitter in the process.

“Heavy Metal and Reflective,” which she’s released through her own label Azealia Banks Records, is an odd choice as both a comeback single and a declaration of independence. The rumbling rave-trap beat by producer Lil Internet—the Beyoncé video director who inspired the seapunk aesthetic that Banks has been accused of ripping off in the past—is sufficiently banging, but Banks approaches it with a low-key, conversational flow that doesn’t do much to suggest a take-no-prisoners rapper who’s just been let off her label-imposed chain. READ FULL STORY

M.I.A. and Partysquad release 'Gold'

Dutch DJ duo Partysquad were part of the sprawling crew of producers behind M.I.A.’s brilliant and noisy Matangi album, helping bring to life the Shampoo-referencing standout track “Double Bubble Trouble.” M.I.A.’s returned the favor now by appearing on the pair’s new Partysquad Summer Mixtape 2014. Along with a remix of “Double Bubble Trouble,” the 77-minute DJ mix also features a brand new collaboration with the Sri Lankan-born singer.

With its rowdy pile-up of handclaps, whistles, Caribbean rhythms, and woozy, pitch-bent synthesizer horns,”Gold” would have fit in well on Matangi. Actually, it sounds quite a bit like a Diplo production–Partysquad co-authored Major Lazer’s cacophonous reggae/EDM hybrid “Original Don”–so it does a pretty good job of suggesting what it might sound like if the creative partnership of M.I.A. and the DJ hadn’t flamed out as spectacularly as their romantic one.


Chippy Nonstop unveils her dirty-cute single 'Peeka'

Rapper and burgeoning pop star Chippy Nonstop resides in Los Angeles, but it might be more accurate to say she lives on the Internet, where she’s amassed an army of fans on Twitter and other social networking platforms through virally popular singles like “Money Dance” and “Kicked Out Da Club.” The latter single perfectly sums up both her sound (club rap with an emphasis on regional styles like Bay Area hyphy) and her philosophy (which is YOLO to the extreme).

Her latest single is called “Peeka,” which pairs a buzzy, bass-heavy beat with pitch-shifted vocals that use the name of the most popular Pokemon character as a euphemism for a very non-G-rated act. She says that it was recorded in just one day, and that, “I want my fans to have this song for the summer time to dance outside their homes in the sprinklers in.” As I write this, those fans are feverishly posting memes in anticipation of its release, so without further ado, here it is.

Dance-music legend Arthur Baker returns with 'No Price'

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Daft Punk’s Random Access Memories helped to revitalize the careers of disco-era masters Nile Rodgers and Giorgio Moroder. Now Arthur Baker—who helped guide disco’s evolution into modern dance music, producing Afrika Bambaataa’s massively influential “Planet Rock” and remixing the biggest pop stars of the ’80s (including, weirdly, Bruce Springsteen, who’s not known for being a club-music kind of guy) along the way—is engineering a comeback of his own.

Baker’s new track, “No Price,” was first written and recorded in 1979 for a collaborative album with soul singer Joe Bataan that was scrapped when their label folded. Thirty years later, Baker dusted it off and sent it to Al-P from MSTRKRFT, and later invited Chromeo crooner Dave 1 to add a new lead vocal part. The final result is a glossy, string-laden jam that gooses peak-era disco funk with some contemporary thump. Baker’s calling his new project Slam Dunk’d, and they’ll be releasing a full album in September.

READ FULL STORY

In the studio: Weezer discusses lyrics, the new album title, and Ric Ocasek

We’re still a few months away from the arrival of Weezer’s new album Everything Will Be Alright in the End, but you can get a good sense of what to expect by reading about EW‘s exclusive visit to the studio. I spent two days with the men of Weezer, and we had a ton of conversations both about the new album and about the stuff bands talk about between takes.

But of course there was not enough room to get all of the gems into the piece. If you’re hungry for more, here are a handful of awesome bits that were left on the cutting room floor. READ FULL STORY

Yung Flight releases debut video 'To the Top'

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Yung Flight is a 21-year-old rapper currently living in Northern Virginia. He has a new single called “To the Top” that gives a Southern twist to the current cloud rap wave and provides an excellent platform to show off his raspy, breathy flow and his willingness to take risks with rhyme schemes. It also has a sweet R&B-flavored hook. Flight’s still so new that that’s about all the information I have on him right now, aside from the fact that he’s working on his first mixtape.

In the video, he and his crew wander around New York City and do a lot of looking like they have plans to conquer it soonish. Judging by his first release, that doesn’t seem like an impossible goal.

READ FULL STORY

Bruce Springsteen debuts short film for 'Hunter of Invisible Game'

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To mark the end of his latest massive world tour, Bruce Springsteen just posted a thank-you message to fans on his website, along with a short film based around “Hunter of Invisible Game” from his most recent album, High Hopes. The Boss not only stars in the 10-plus-minute clip but co-directed it along with frequent collaborator Thom Zimny, who’s been working on Springsteen documentaries for over a decade.

The short revolves around Springsteen playing a grizzled loner in what seems to be some sort of post-apocalyptic world that’s reverted to a pre-20th-century technological level—or at least that’s what all the crumbling ruins and horse riding seem to suggest. (Think The Road but gauzily dreamy rather than relentlessly horrifying.) The folk-soul song gets expanded to fit the visual format with an extended instrumental intro arranged for synthesizer, strings, and, uh, wind chimes.

For a first-time effort it’s not too bad. If he ever gets tired of making records (doubtful) he could probably pull off a post-catastrophe cowboy flick. “Hunter” is streaming now at his site.

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