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Tag: New Stuff (11-20 of 1147)

Wild Smiles' 'Another Year Older' is a slice of grunge-pop heaven

There are a lot of bands trying to do the ’90s thing right now, but few do it as effectively or efficiently as Winchester, England’s Wild Smiles.

Their new single “Another Year Older” skillfully jams together a handful of distinct alt-rock styles from the time, from grunge to Britpop to shoegaze, into one four-minute mass of post-adolescent angst and heroically distorted guitars.

If EW‘s endorsement’s not enough for you, consider the fact that Portishead’s Geoff Barrow is not only a fan of the band but even released their first EP on his own label. And that guy’s a certified genius.

Their new album Always Tomorrow is out today.

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TWICEYOUNG gives off dreamy electro vibes on 'Stay the Same'

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Nashville trio TWICEYOUNG has the chiming guitars and sweet hooks of an indie rock band, the synthesized sounds of an electronic project, and a sweeping cinematic sensibility that’s probably making film and TV music supervisors exceptionally happy.

Their new EP Prefer You drops on Nov. 11 and with the frequency that they’ve been appearing on music blogs it already seems destined to be a cult sensation, if not something bigger. In the lead-up to its release, they’re sharing “Stay the Same,” a cool blend of postpunk and dream pop that sounds like the slightly more gothed-out cousin of Drive soundtrack sensations Electric Youth.

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Ryan Hemsworth talks about his new direction on 'Alone for the First Time'

Ryan Hemsworth has spent the past several years doing exactly what a young producer working on the increasingly blurry border between dance music and hip-hop should do to advance his career: playing for an adoring underground fan base while also booking bigger and bigger EDM festivals and assembling a portfolio of high-profile remixes for clients like Cat Power and Frank Ocean.

According to the producer playbook, his next move should have been to cash in all the professional capital he’s accumulated to pack an album of expansive, dance-friendly pop and rap with enough guest stars to attract attention from mainstream listeners. Instead, next week he’ll release Alone for the First Time, a collection of subdued pop songs with a decidedly organic feel, created alongside cult artists like Dawn Golden and The GTW who many listeners have probably never heard of. It’s a decision he’s extremely happy with.

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'The Goonies' meets 'The X-Files' in Rich Aucoin's 'Want to Believe' video

Halifax indie-pop auteur Rich Aucoin‘s second album, Ephemeral, was heavily inspired by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince, and was in fact written specifically to sync up with the novella’s 1979 claymation film adaptation. For the video for the song “Want to Believe,” though, he seems to be tapping into a couple other beloved entertainment properties, pairing a ragtag gang of BMX-riding, adventure-seeking misfits with a burnt-out guy in a rumpled suit who has an obsession with exploring the unknown and a very familiar UFO poster on the wall. The wacky hijinks the group gets up to go nicely with the song’s fist-pumping, Andrew-W.K.-meets-The-Arcade-Fire positivity.

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Nicki Minaj and some other, less important guys release 'Only'

Nicki-Minaj

Yesterday it was announced that the release of Nicki Minaj’s The Pinkprint will be pushed back from Nov. 24 to Dec. 15, but to make up for it, she’s released a new single, “Only,” whose bonkers cover art (featuring cartoon portraits of Minaj in some kind of leather bodysuit and Drake in a pope hat) she’d previously teased on Twitter.

It features verses by Drake and Lil Wayne, a hook by Chris Brown, and a beat by Dr. Luke, Cirkut, and J Mike, but Minaj’s rap is far and away the best part about it. It starts with her refuting the long running rumors that she traded sex for support from Wayne and Drake, then uses a hypothetical menage á trois to assert sexual dominance over both of them, seeming to claim the alpha spot on the Young Money/Cash Money roster, and neither one of her teammates can do much to change that perception.

You can hear it here.

 

Niia's 'Breaking' gives vocal jazz an intriguing modern makeover

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Singer-songwriter Niia Bertino–who goes by her first name, pronounced”Nye-a”–is crafting a singular career path for herself. A classically trained pianist with a pop-friendly voice, she got her first big break on Wyclef Jean’s “Sweetest Girl (Dollar Bill)” but has largely eschewed radio-friendly hits in favor of making subtle, intimate music that rewards careful listening. Her upcoming debut Generation Blue (out tomorrow on Something Local) was recorded with Danish musician Robin Hannibal, the producer behind the cultishly beloved groups Rhye and Quadron, and it deftly uses the template of contemporary minimalist electronic music to help bring vocal jazz into the here and now, a difficult mission that it pulls off with surprising ease.

The intriguingly spare “Breaking” is typical of the pair’s approach, even if it is atypical subject matter. “This song was one of the hardest songs to write on the EP,” Niia writes in an email. “Until I was really ready to admit my mistakes, the song felt unfinished. This is my first real apology song.”

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Mykki Blanco on Gay Dog Food and why you shouldn't call him a gay rapper

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Michael Quattlebaum Jr., better known as Mykki Blanco, is a singular presence in hip-hop, not just because he’s part of the first wave of openly queer rappers to gain traction with an audience outside the queer community but simply because there’s no other hip-hop artists who look, sound, or act like him. On his new mixtape Gay Dog Food he shows off some of the blunt-instrument flow that he built his reputation on, but spends far more time channeling Iggy Pop with an elastic sprechgesang that he uses to deliver hallucinatory lyrics about freaks, drugs, and kinky sex, wallowing in transgressive behavior with manic glee over beats engineered for maximum sonic filth. It’s one of the year’s most bracing rap records, and signals Mykki Blanco’s elevation from a new artist to keep an eye out for to an icon who demands attention. A few days before Gay Dog Food‘s release EW spoke to him by phone about where’s he’s been and where’ he’s heading.

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Hackers persuade Drake to release three new songs

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Hackers have had a lot of negative press recently, and for good reason, but they’re not all bad. Sometimes they can even be a force for good, like when they help push new Drake songs into the world.

Over the weekend Drizzy posted three new tracks on his SoundCloud with the explanation that he knew “hackers” had already got their hands on them. Produced by his go-to beat makers Boi-1da and Noah “40″ Shebib, “How About Now” and “Heat of the Moment” both put the rapper’s notoriously intense feelings front and center, but “6 God” channels his wild-out, getting-into-shit-at-the-strip-club side.

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21 thoughts on 21 years of the Afghan Whigs' masterpiece 'Gentlemen'

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When I first started this job back in April 2011, I was subjected to an EW tradition: I was sent a list of questions whose answers made up an office-wide introduction to my cultural obsessions. When it came time to express an all-time favorite from the music world, I settled on the one name I always shout out whenever anybody asks me what songwriter I defend above all others: Greg Dulli.

Dulli has made excellent work I have absolutely adored in several different guises, including the Twilight Singers, the Gutter Twins, and the Backbeat Band. But he got started with the Afghan Whigs, a mercurial indie rock/R&B hybrid from Cincinnati who first appeared on the scene with the haunting Big Top Halloween in 1988 and wrapped up their original run with 1998′s 1965. (They recently reconstituted for an ongoing series of shows and the brand new album Do To The Beast, which came out earlier this year.) Their masterpiece is, undoubtedly, their 1993 major-label debut Gentlemen, which is getting the deluxe reissue treatment today in the form of Gentlemen at 21. The new version contains a remastered version of the original record, plus a second disc of demos, B-sides, and live tracks that further flesh out the strange and wonderful universe the band helped create more than two decades ago.

Gentlemen has been a cornerstone album for the better part of its existence (and, subsequently, mine), so in honor of this definitive work now being able to legally order a boilermaker, here are 21 thoughts about Gentlemen. READ FULL STORY

Electropop chanteuse Chela channels vintage Madonna on 'Handful of Gold'

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EW recently reported that IHEARTCOMIX, stalwart pillar of the LA dance music community, is launching a new singles-only label called IHC 1NFINITY. Now we’ve got a first look at some of the music they’ll be releasing.

Its first release is by Australian electropop artist Chela, who’s previously recorded for the taste-making French record/fashion label Kitsuné. On previous releases, she’s offered a contemporary update of bouncy ’80s new wave from the brief era when synthesizers had come into the picture but the influence of UK punk and post-punk hadn’t quite taken over yet. Her new track, “Handful of Gold,” has a bigger beat and a bigger chorus than her earlier singles; the results make Chela sound almost spookily like Madonna back before she reached a superhuman level of fame, when she could still be caught kicking it at Danceteria. It’s an auspicious start for an audacious new venture.

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