The Music Mix Music news, reviews, albums, concerts, and downloads

Tag: New Stuff (21-30 of 1099)

Video: Get hooked on Tunde Olaniran's 'Critical'

Tunde-Olaniran.jpg

While many of his contemporaries work to cultivate an air of mystery through secret identities and un-Google-able stage names, Tunde Olaniran is generating a more intriguingly ambiguous vibe with a fraction of the effort. A native of Flint, Michigan, better known as Detroit’s less quaint sibling, Olaniran works in the gaps between hip-hop, R&B, dance music, and punk, weaving together aggressive beats, noisy electronics, and an intuitive knack for melody into a seamless, surprisingly pop-friendly whole. His recent five-song EP Yung Archetype sounds like Yeezus as a soul record, or if The-Dream made a record with TV on the Radio.

Last week Olaniran released a video for the brooding, spacious Yung Archetype track “Critical,” which he wrote for a family member who was diagnosed with cancer. It’s an emotionally intense four-and-a-half-minute ride, but I’ve had it on heavy rotation nonetheless. Hit the jump to get hooked. READ FULL STORY

The-Dream gives 'Black' the full video treatment

The-Dream.jpg

Back in April, R&B king the-Dream released a new song, “Black,” that traded in his usual strip-club-friendly beats and bedroom-focused lyrics for anthemic sweep and a political message inspired by Nelson Mandela’s death. It was miles away from the Dream that so many of us know and love with a ridiculous, almost cultish avidity, but he managed to stick the tricky landing; “Black” is like one of R. Kelly’s patented Inspiration Jams without the shlockiness that those usually come with, or the creepy feeling that you’re getting life advice from a sexual predator.

“Black” launched with a lyric video cut together out of footage of political activism in progress, ranging from Tommie Smith and John Carlos giving the black power salute at the 1968 Olympics to Pussy Riot marching defiantly down a crowded Russian street. Today he dropped the song’s official video, which continues the political theme with an almost surreally broad coalition of protesters marching against racism, classism, homophobia, Wall Street, the Russian invasion of the Ukraine, violence in Chicago, and what seems like dozens of other causes. The video’s message may be a tad muddled (especially when you factor in the singer’s recent arrest on assault charges), but with the-Dream flexing a newfound ability to manipulate emotional switches beyond horniness and regret, it still hits. It’s probably not a coincidence that it’s dropping right before a day commemorating revolutionary political activity.

Watch the video below. (It may be NSFW because of brief female toplessness.)

READ FULL STORY

Nile Rodgers releases new song, 'Do What You Wanna Do'

The last couple of years have been very good to Nile Rodgers. The anti-disco sentiment that has long held back his reputation as a world-class musician, songwriter, and producer has finally started to fade away, and his work on Daft Punk’s Random Access Memories brought him back to a familiar spot on the top of the charts for the first time in years.

The Chic mastermind is continuing this hot streak with a new solo single. “Do What You Wanna Do” was recorded at last summer’s International Music Summit and auctioned off to benefit his We Are Family Foundation. The winner, Mark Brown, is owner of the dance music label Cr2 Records. He’s already issued a series of remixes by the likes of Moon Boots, and the label will finally release the original version of the track, which gives a modern-sounding makeover to Rodgers’s trademark uplifting disco vibe, on August 10. In the meantime, stream it below.

READ FULL STORY

Synthpop surrealists Baathhaus unveil the video for 'Ascension'

 Chicago quartet Baathhaus combines the transgressive glam surrealism of Lady Gaga with a synthpop sound redolent of vintage Erasure, New Order, and other popular acts at retro night at your local gay dance club. Over the past couple of years, they’ve started to accumulate the kind of cult following that an over-the-top theatrical pop band whose multimedia identity feels equally indebted to David Bowie and John Waters deserves, and as their audience has grown, their production values have increased to match.

Last week the group unveiled a new single, “Ascension,” on their SoundCloud, and now they’re ready to unveil the accompanying video. Unlike most Baathhaus productions, “Ascension” features no explosions of fake blood or glitter, but the band’s portrayal of a bourgeois suburban family and its teen daughter’s prom date is fraught with psychological tension. Member Dan Foley says, “The music video turns the lens on an everyday situation and shows us the dense and complex layers that can live inside of one simple moment. Longing, lust, anxiety, and the thrill of anticipation fill the quiet rooms of a suburban home and provide the perfect backdrop for the lush and shimmering pop of ‘Ascension.'”

Watch the exclusive video below.

READ FULL STORY

Rapper-turned-popster Kitty unveils new video for 'Marijuana'

Kitty.jpg

The Florida-born, NYC-based musician Kitty used to go by the name Kitty Pryde, and she used to be a rapper. Her 2012 song “Okay Cupid” was a pretty massive viral hit (its official video has nearly a million and a half views on YouTube) that brought her a decent amount of acclaim amidst an epic amount of hate from people who saw a young female rapper who didn’t seem interested in rapping about things that grouchy hip-hop fans are necessarily into as a sign of the impending apocalypse (or something).

Kitty still raps, but she’s broadened her overall approach and started moving toward straight-up pop, which considering the sing-songy flow she’s been showing off since “Okay Cupid” isn’t too drastic a leap. Last month she released an EP called Impatiens, which she quickly followed up with a new track, “Marijuana,” that now has a video. It’s her most successful stab at a pop song yet, with a bubbly, laid-back beat that fits the title well, plus a vocal part that ups the melodic quotient while still retaining just enough hip-hop inflection to make the track snap. The end result is a special kind of summer jam that forgoes the celebratory grooves that typify the genre in favor of an effortless chill that can act as mental air conditioning during ridiculously hot and humid days, which should come in handy very soon.

Check it out after the jump. READ FULL STORY

Busta Rhymes and Eminem drop 'Calm Down'

Busta-Rhyme.jpg

Earlier today, Busta Rhymes dropped a new single, “Calm Down,” which finds the head-banging hip-hop iconoclast facing off against fellow veteran MC Eminem over the span of nearly six minutes atop a clangorous beat by Scoop DeVille that’s based around a sample of Bob & Earl’s “Harlem Shuffle,” better known as the horn part from House of Pain’s “Jump Around.” As you might expect from two of the most verbose rappers in the game, the song is a relentlessly dense torrent of lyric-spitting that reaffirms some of the classic battle-rap values that have fallen out of fashion in recent years while avoiding getting bogged down in any “get off my lawn” old-man attitude.

Busa Bus talked to EW today in an exclusive interview about “Calm Down.” Below, hear the track and read what he has to say about the song and about the first time he heard Eminem rap.

READ FULL STORY

Listen to Grimes' new R&B-meets-EDM banger 'Go'

Synth-loving art-pop faerie Grimes has been on the verge of a major breakthrough ever since she released her 2012 album Visions, which refined the experimental electronic approach of her first two LPs and infused her sound with big, undeniable hooks that can stand up next to anything on the Top 40. It has stealthily become one of the most influential records of the past few years, and you can hear ideas borrowed from it all over the radio, including pretty much every synth-heavy pop song by a female performer that’s broken big in the past year.

Grimes herself has been patiently setting up her next move, signing to Jay Z’s Roc Nation for management and apparently fielding some songwriting gigs from major stars. Earlier this month at the Governor’s Ball festival in New York City she played a handful of new songs, including one that she claimed was written for, and rejected by, Rihanna. Today, she posted the finished recording of that track, entitled “Go,” on her SoundCloud. Produced with her longtime musical partner Blood Diamonds, it’s her most ambitiously accessible song yet, with an R&B-heavy vocal melody and arena-sized EDM synths that sound like they could have been lifted off of a Diplo track. It strongly hints that her next album (which she’s still working on) will be aimed straight at pop radio.

READ FULL STORY

Pink Mountaintops unveil fiery new video for 'Second Summer of Love'

The Second Summer of Love was a period in the late ’80s where MDMA, Chicago acid house, and British youth culture collided explosively to create what came to be called “raving.” It’s also the title of a ripping new song from the new album, Get Back, by Canada’s greatest extant rock band Pink Mountaintops.

The song is a vaguely apocalyptic portrait of subultural youth, and the video takes it a step further with a bunch of grunge kids wielding baseball bats, riding flaming skateboards, and looking existential in front of pyrotechnic displays. You’re not likely to see this much ennui and fire in one place all day.

Hit the jump to check it out. READ FULL STORY

Karen O will release her home-recorded debut solo album in September

The last Yeah Yeah Yeahs album, Mosquito, was their most elaborate recording to date, complete with the gospel choir that’s pretty much de rigueur for overproduced rock records. For her upcoming debut solo album, frontwoman Karen O is going hard in the opposite direction. Crush Songs, which will be released on Strokes singer Julian Casablancas’s Cult Records on September 9, is a collection of stripped-down, lo-fi home recordings along the lines of “The Moon Song,” her Oscar-nominated contribution to the soundtrack for Spike Jonze’s Her.

The material on Crush Songs was recorded in 2006 and 2007, during the peak of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs post-Fever to Tell popularity. Karen O was 27 at the time, and according to a quote in her press release, she “crushed a lot” during that time.

Crush Songs will be available on CD, digitally, and in a special limited edition that includes a sunburst-colored vinyl album and a set of personal drawings with handwritten lyrics, which is available for pre-order now.

Hear the Weeknd's latest sex jam 'Often'

 Let’s see: pitch-black synth tones, cavernous reverb, warped vocal samples, explicit lyrical references to kinky sex stuff, explicit lyrical references to doing brain-melting amounts of drugs–yep, “Often” is definitely a Weeknd song. And if you’re filling out your Weeknd bingo card, you can also mark the box that says “released with no warning or commentary” for the win.

If there’s one thing that sets the track, which the perpetually enigmatic singer dropped on SoundCloud last night, apart from his usual work, it’s the atypically aggressive edge that comes through in the stuttering kick drums and a vocal part that crowds the beat in a compellingly claustrophobic way. It’s hard to hear it and not wish he’d brought more of that energy to last fall’s underperforming Kiss Land.

Find a stereo that can handle its insanely deep bass, put on your official Weeknd fashion sweats, and hit the jump to stream it.

READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Music

Advertisement

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP