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Tag: Oscars (1-9 of 9)

Want to buy the Oscar-nominated music from the 'Her' soundtrack? You can't

HER-POSTER

When the chatter first began about Spike Jonze’s warm, lovely film Her, one of the talking points was the music: Arcade Fire member William Butler and fellow Canadian Owen Pallett (known to the pop world as Final Fantasy) would be writing the score, Arcade Fire would perform it, and additional musical input would come from Yeah Yeah Yeahs frontwoman Karen O (who had previously collaborated with Jonze on the music for Where The Wild Things Are).

The results lived up to the anticipation; the music in Her perfectly complements the internal life of lead character Theodore Twombly (played by Joaquin Phoenix). The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences agreed, and when the Oscar nominations were handed down last week, both the score (by Butler and Pallett) and the original song “The Moon Song” (performed by Karen O and written by her and Jonze) were included in the race for prizes. 

But despite the accolades, the music from Her is unavailable for purchase, either in physical or digital form. READ FULL STORY

The Oscar music snubs: no love for Taylor Swift, Lana Del Rey, 'Llewyn Davis' or Coldplay

Check to make sure the rivers haven’t turned to blood and all first-borns aren’t suddenly afflicted with pox, because the impossible has happened: Taylor Swift was not nominated for an award.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ passing on Swift’s “Sweeter Than Fiction” (from the film One Chance) is easily one of the most high-profile snubs from this morning’s Oscar nominations announcement. The song was nominated for a Golden Globe and seemed like an obvious pick for an invite on Oscar night, if only because people love giving Taylor Swift gold trophies (and also because it would have brought some much-needed youth to the Oscar party).

Instead, the contenders in the Best Original Song category are U2’s “Ordinary Love” (from Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom), Karen O’s “The Moon Song” (Her), Pharrell Williams’ “Happy” (Despicable Me 2), Bruce Broughton and Dennis Spiegel’s “Alone But Not Alone” (from the deeply obscure Christian film of the same name), and the song “Let It Go” from the Disney blockbuster Frozen, which is performed by Idina Menzel and written by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez. (It’s the writers, not the performers, who take home the gold.)

The race seems to be down to the Golden Globe winner and sentimental favorite “Ordinary Love” (which would be as much an award for the late Nelson Mandela as it would be for U2) and the sales juggernaut “Let It Go” (which has propelled the Frozen soundtrack to the top of the mainstream album chart and elevated it to gold status). “Happy” and “The Moon Song” are much longer shots, but both are both cool choices crafted by deeply respected members of the music world.

Of course, that leaves “Alone But Not Alone,” one of the most inexplicable Oscar nominations in the history of the awards. The film barely exists, and the song itself is a dreary dirge of a hymn that sounds like it should be played in the midst of a sleepy Sunday morning mass. It has virtually no chance of winning, and its legacy will be as a bizarre curiosity in a category notorious for them.

It would be a less shocking inclusion if the Oscar nomination shortlist (75 songs in all) didn’t contain so many markedly stronger options. READ FULL STORY

Rodriguez, from Oscar-nominated doc 'Searching for Sugar Man,' books Coachella

It just goes to show: When you have an acclaimed feature documentary made about you that goes on to be nominated for an Academy Award, you’re suddenly much more in demand. Rodriguez, the musician at the center of the Oscar-nominated Searching for Sugar Man, has joined the line-ups of three major music festivals: Coachella (in Indio, Calif. this April), Primavera (in Spain this May), and Glastonbury (in the U.K. this June), Billboard reportsREAD FULL STORY

Adele scores Oscar nod, books Golden Globes appearance

A lot of stars say they’ll commit themselves to their children only to use them as career-extending props and fodder for insane stories about secret rooms in basketball arenas. But Adele has really put her money where her mouth is: Since the birth of her first child, she has kept a remarkably low-profile, especially for somebody who was the biggest-selling artist in America for two years running.

But she’ll be dusting off her work shoes on Sunday when she attends this Sunday’s Golden Globe Awards, where she’ll cross her fingers in hopes that “Skyfall” wins the hardware. And she’ll have at least one more red carpet to walk in the coming months, as “Skyfall” was also nominated for an Academy Award in the Best Original Song category this morning. (Adele is also nominated for a Grammy, though it’s unclear whether she’ll be attending that particular show.)
READ FULL STORY

Oscar voters snub Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross for 'The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo' score

There are plenty of complaints this morning about Oscar snubs, and many of the people and films those arguments will name have a genuine case. Considering the year he has had, it’s absurd that Michael Fassbender didn’t get nominated for something (his performance in Shame was the most daring, but there’s a case to be made for his work in Jane Eyre as well as his turn as Magneto in X-Men: First Class), and the fact that treacly pablum like Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close got a nod for Best Picture and Bridesmaids didn’t (a movie that, despite the poop jokes and Kristen Wiig mugging, actually has something to say) is pretty absurd.

But as far as the Music Mix is concerned, the real crimes were committed in the music categories. Only two tunes were nominated for Best Original Song, leaving that roundly excellent and Golden Globe-winning Madonna song on the bench. The one saving grace in this category is the fact that “Man or Muppet” may actually get performed on the show, making it the second best TV appearance by our fine felt friends in 2012 (because nothing will be able to top Miss Piggy’s appearance on Project Runway All Stars).

The real crime is in the Best Original Score category, where Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross were shut out for their exemplary work for The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. READ FULL STORY

Courtney Love talks sex, drugs, and allegedly getting blamed for 'the downfall of Def Leppard' in (possibly) craziest interview to date

Courtney Love has always been a quote machine.

But I’m hard-pressed to think of an interview of hers quite as entertainingly bonkers as the two-part epic that addiction website The Fix has just published, in which the singer-actress discusses her numerous drug problems, her sex life, and a boatload of celebrity acquaintances. You’ll find a clutch of choice quotes below, but the interview is well worth checking out in full. It’s not every day someone name checks Jimmy Iovine, Tesla (the rock band, not the pioneering electrical engineer), and Carl Jung in almost the same breath.

READ FULL STORY

Oscars won't invite Best Song nominees to perform: Will you miss them?

Oscar producers announced this week that none of the Best Original Song nominees will be invited to perform at the Mar. 7 Academy Awards. Given that we recently dubbed this year’s crop of music-Oscar contenders the “worst nominations ever,” I suppose it would be hypocritical to get too upset at this news. Will anyone really miss seeing Nine‘s “Take It All” or Paris 36‘s “Loin de Paname” performed live? It would have been nice to see Crazy Heart‘s “The Weary Kind,” maybe, but that’s about it.

Still, Best Original Song performances have yielded some very worthy Oscar moments in years past. I’m thinking of the late, great Elliott Smith’s shy “Miss Misery” in 1998 (below), or Glen Hansard and Markéta Irglová’s awwww-inspiring “Falling Slowly” ten years later, or Bruce Springsteen’s moving (and excellently goateed) “Streets of Philadelphia” in 1994. Even if I won’t miss this year’s nominees, I certainly hope this isn’t a permanent decision to exclude music performances from future award ceremonies.

What do you think of this move? Were you looking forward to seeing any of this year’s Best Original Songs performed? What are some of your favorite Oscar music moments from the past?

(Follow the Music Mix on Twitter: @EWMusicMix.)

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2010 Oscars for Best Song: Worst nominations ever?

The Academy Awards are known for the odd Best Song stumble or snub (shutting out Bruce Springsteen entirely for 2008’s widely acclaimed “The Wrestler,” even after it won the Golden Globe, for example). Though they’ve made some admirable choices, too: See the triumph of Three 6 Mafia’s “Hard Out Here for a Pimp” for Hustle and Flow in 2005, and Markéta Irglová and Glen Hansard’s Once theme “Falling Slowly” in ’07.

But this year, Ryan Bingham’s lovely and eminently worthy “The Weary Kind” from Crazy Heart aside, the nominations are decidedly underwhelming. No offense to Randy Newman, the Susan Lucci of Oscar Song noms, who gets two this year for his work on Disney’s The Princess and the Frog, but seriously, he needed two?

And as for Marion Cotillard’s speakeasy shimmy “Take It All” from the star-studded dud Nine, and the boppy piano ditty “Loin de Paname” from hardly-seen French musical Paris 36? All we can say is, sacre bleu. Surely, the Academy could have dug a little deeper? (Though speaking of blue, points to them for passing on Leona Lewis’ Celine-style Avatar fail, “I See You.”)

If there were justice in the ranks, we might have seen a nod for Karen O’s organic and sweetly childlike Where The Wild Things Are work, specifically “All Is Love,” or Ed Helms’ Dada goof “Stu’s Song” from The Hangover. Neither would likely have won, but they deserved a chance, as did Mary J. Blige’s “I Can See In Color” for Precious, Duffy’s “Smoke Without Fire” from An Education, and Sad Brad Smith’s Up in the Air elegy “Help Yourself.”

Also absent? Anything at all from the Twilight: New Moon soundtrack. No matter what you think of the film (to recap: rainforest, sparkle, mope, werewolf, mope, kiss), its music was almost uniformly excellent. Death Cab for Cutie, Thom Yorke, Lykke Li (who made the eligibility short list, at least), and countless others contributed tracks that should have at least earned them a shot at the statuette; it’s unclear why they didn’t.

But you tell us, readers—is this the lineup you were hoping for? Who most deserves the prize, regardless of whether or not they were nominated?

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Taylor Swift and Stevie Nicks’ Grammy duet: out of sight, or out of tune?
Grammys pay tribute to Michael Jackson with help from his kids: A fitting salute?
Grammys: the complete list of winners

Hannah Montana? Ed Helms? What do YOU think should be nominated for an Original Song Oscar?

I’ve embedded my favorite from the 63 songs named yesterday as contenders for the Original Song category at this year’s Oscars: Ryan Bingham and T-Bone Burnett’s “The Weary Kind,” which I have fallen in love with despite not yet having seen the actual film. (I’m a Bingham nut; sue me.) God only knows what sort of chances Bingham and Burnett have — while I don’t think Randy Newman is nominated personally, The Princess and the Frog is all up in this dancerie, as is Hannah Montana: The Movie (though not “The Climb,” for previously explained reasons), and Karen O’s great work from Where the Wild Things Are. Seems like the new songs from Nine (regardless of quality) would also be utterly irresistible to voters, and we here at EW threw our weight behind “Stu’s Song” from The Hangover all the way back in June. If “I’m On a Boat” can get nominated for a Grammy, why can’t Ed Helms find Oscar gold?

Read the full list of eligible songs after the jump, and give us your picks in the comments: If you were choosing this year’s Academy Award nominees, Mixers, who would make the cut?

READ FULL STORY

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