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Tag: Patti Smith (1-3 of 3)

Patti Smith remembers Lou Reed: 'He was our generation's New York poet'

The most remarkable aspect of the cavalcade of tributes that have been written in the wake of Lou Reed’s death last weekend is that just about everybody—including his collaborators and friends—has written about him with a genuine sense of awe. That’s how powerful and influential a personality Reed was, and that’s how deeply he touched those who were closest to him.

Such is the case with Patti Smith, Reed’s sometime friend and fellow downtown denizen. In a lovely, poetic tribute published by The New Yorker, Smith talks about hearing of Reed’s passing, reflecting on New York in the ’70s, and connecting him to a long cavalcade of poets. She talks with great passion about running across Reed while she was building the Patti Smith Group. “Within a few years, in that same room upstairs at Max’s, Lenny Kaye, Richard Sohl, and I presented our own land of a thousand dances,” she wrote. “Lou would often stop by to see what we were up to. A complicated man, he encouraged our efforts, then turned and provoked me like a Machiavellian schoolboy. I would try to steer clear of him, but, catlike, he would suddenly reappear, and disarm me with some Delmore Schwartz line about love or courage. I didn’t understand his erratic behavior or the intensity of his moods, which shifted, like his speech patterns, from speedy to laconic. But I understood his devotion to poetry and the transporting quality of his performances.”

Check out the entirety Smith’s remembrance at The New Yorker, and be sure to also read the tributes by Reed’s wife Laurie Anderson and friend and collaborator Lars Ulrich.

Patti Smith live in L.A. -- still a musical shaman at 65

Back in the mid 1990s, as an 18-year-old college student living in New York City, I saw Patti Smith play her first show in 15 years at downtown punk palace CBGBs.

I was already obsessed with her music and writing — I covered songs from her rebellious, beautiful first album, 1975’s Horses, and had written a poem about her (yes, it was called Homage to Patti Smith). So I gripped a copy of the poem and a red rose to give her before the show, which I did, going back stage and handing them to her silently. She took them both, silently.

Later, pressed up against the stage with a friend, just below her microphone, I saw Smith launch into a three-hour show full of fury, power, sweat, and rock ‘n’ roll. On stage, singing with her arms raised, she tore the rose I gave her to shreds, stuffing half the petals in her pocket, and throwing the other half in the air, letting them shower down like bits of red rain.

To those who love Smith’s music — from the landmark Horses to this year’s Banga, filled with references to Russian literature, her old friend, late French actress Maria Schneider, Amy Winehouse, and 2011’s Japanese earthquake and tsunami — she’s more than a muse. She represents something else: the ability to be emotional, literary, musical, and free outside the confines of age, gender, time, and place;. She’s a constant reminder that soulful, smart music exists beyond the current scope of commercial pop for audiences who crave that kind of sustenance.

At Wednesday night’s intimate, private show at Apogee’s Berkeley Street Studio in Santa Monica for Los Angeles radio station KCRW (it will be broadcast Nov. 14 on the station’s Morning Becomes Eclectic), Smith proved her continued worth as a musician and performer. The crowd consisted of less than 200 people, including stars such as Tom Hanks, Rita Wilson, Tim Robbins, Ed Harris (wearing a fedora pulled over his face), and Ellen Page, who looked just as starry-eyed as everyone else in the packed space. READ FULL STORY

Jack White, Depeche Mode, Patti Smith to cover U2's 'Achtung Baby'

Matt Jelonek/WireImage.com

Et tu, Achtung?

These days, you can’t throw a John Fluevog boot without hitting a ’90s tribute album.

Spin recently got indie-rockers including Surfer Blood and Jeff the Brotherhood to make a pretty good one with Newermind, a Nirvana tribute released on the 20th anniversary of Nevermind. Stereogum.com has done the same for Radiohead’s OK Computer, Bjork’s Post, and R.E.M.’s Automatic for the People.

And today, Bono confirmed that Jack White, Patti Smith, Depeche Mode, Damien Rice and others will cover songs from U2′s Achtung Baby for an album commissioned by the U.K. rock magazine Q.

White, who played with U2′s the Edge in the documentary It Might Get Loud, has chosen “Love Is Blindness.” Smith’s claiming “Until the End of the World.” Depeche Mode will cover “So Cruel.” And Rice will play “One,” a song he once performed in a busking duet with Bono.

The rest of the lineup hasn’t been announced, nor has the release date. But maybe U2 should add Coldplay to that list? We all know how much Bono loves Chris Martin.

Read more at EW.com:
Bono rushed to the hospital for heart trouble?

U2 break Rolling Stones’ record for highest-grossing tour of all time

U2, Justin Bieber donate songs to Japan relief CD

Bono’s back injury on tour

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