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Tag: Playlists (1-10 of 15)

Your Ultimate Guilty Pleasure Summer Playlist

Who doesn’t love a gloriously dumb summer song?

In the issue of EW on stands this Friday, we examine the phenomenon of hits like Magic!’s “Rude” and 5 Seconds of Summer’s “She Looks So Perfect” — sunny, sonically undemanding wonders that seem to rise when the mercury does.

It also got us thinking about some of our favorite non-Mensa tracks from summers past, so we made a decade-spanning Spotify playlist featuring hall of famers like Color Me Badd, Coolio, Nelly, and Tag Team. Whoomp! Here it is: READ FULL STORY

Stream a Father's Day Playlist curated by the Walkmen's Walter Martin

When beloved aughties fivesome the Walkmen announced their indefinite hiatus late last year, Walter Martin decided to take an indie-rock road less traveled.

After becoming a dad for the first time, he began working on a sweetly understated of collection of folk-tinged ditties about clouds, Costa Rican monkeys, and messy hair, and brought in friends like Karen O of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs and Matt Berninger of the National to help out in the studio.

The result, We’re All Young Together, was released last month — music to the ears of parents eager for  family-friendly albums beyond the dancing dinosaur/Baby Beluga axis.

In honor of Father’s Day, Martin has created a playlist exclusively for EW; find out why he chose these songs from the likes of Johnny Cash, the Kinks, and Hank Williams Jr. and stream the full set on our Spotify player below: READ FULL STORY

Playlist: Early summer mix feat. Robyn, Ratking, Le1f and more

Thanks to the polar vortex, it’s slated to be an extra-brutal summer. While you wait on the inevitable sweaty radio bangers, stay cool with some of our favorite tracks from the final days of spring.

Ought “Habit” Every time a really good art-rock bell rings, David Byrne gets his wings (or smiles mysteriously, at least).

The Fresh & Onlys “Animal of One” San Francisco psych rock excel­lently updated, with extra reverb.

EMA “3Jane” A mod-goth mood piece as horizon-spanning as singer Erika M. Anderson’s native South Dakota.

READ FULL STORY

Summer Music Preview: Hear indie-dance duo Phantogram's favorite summer songs

Phantogram’s blend of electronic rock, trip-hop and shoegaze dreaminess doesn’t sound like something you’d hear emanating from a barn in upstate New York, but that’s where the duo has written most of their music — at least when they’re not crashing with Olympic snowboarding champion Shaun White.

Now members Josh Carter and Sarah Barthel, who met in high school, will spend the summer in fields, festival stages, and other non-barn structures to promote their latest album Voices now through late August.

And to help inaugurate our Summer Music Preview, on stands today, they made a playlist for us featuring some of their favorite artists, from Beck and Bowie to Q-Tip and Kendrick Lamar. Stream it below: READ FULL STORY

Eat the Beat: The tastiest songs about food

With the release of her new album Food last week, singer and Le Cordon Bleu-certified chef Kelis has gone from “Milkshake” to full-on smorgasbord — tracks on the album include “Jerk Ribs,” “Cobbler” “Friday Fish Fry,” and “Biscuits n’ Gravy.”

But she’s hardly the first artist to find her muse on a menu. Place your order below—and stream our full food playlist (minus a few songs that weren’t available on Spotify; apologies to fans of both Pumpkins and egg-based condiments): READ FULL STORY

Spring playlist with Banks, Sam Smith, Lo-Fang and more: Listen now

Shake off a long, cold winter with these breezy new tracks from artists on the verge—slinky singers, bedroom R&B auteurs, and FoLs (Friends of Lorde).

Sam Smith, “Money on My Mind”
The Londoner’s swinging track—already a U.K. smash—pairs his aching voice with a groove fit for an energy-drink-stocked cocktail lounge. (It also helped nab him a slot on SNL.)

READ FULL STORY

What would Kurt Cobain's music sound like today?

In the new issue of Entertainment Weekly, I ruminate over the anniversary of the death of one of the last great rock stars with a simple question: Had he not died in April 1994, what might Kurt Cobain’s music have sounded like now?

In order to find some possible answers, I talked to Cobain’s friends and collaborators about his potential musical directions; the master playlist craftspeople at Beats Audio took those cues and built a batch of songs that help extrapolate what Cobain might have sounded like had he lived.

“Cobain always seemed like an old soul and I agree that he would have continued to explore more acoustic music, as opposed to electric,” says Beats’ Scott Plagenhoef. “He wrote personal lyrics but they were opaque and non-linear and he never wrote narratives. There is also a temptation to assume major creative forces like Cobain would remain progressive into their older age but the fact of the matter is that was never a quality that he displayed even during his lifetime. There is no indication he would have embraced electronic music, for example.”

The playlist includes a handful of tracks that seem like inevitable Cobain compositions (Elliott Smith’s “Waltz No. 2 (XO),” Wilco’s “How To Fight Loneliness,” The White Stripes’ “We’re Going To Be Friends”), as well as some reasonable stretches (EMA’s “California,” Cat Power’s “He War,” Lambchop’s “My Face Your Ass”). Spin the whole thing here while you consider what might have been.

What do you think Kurt Cobain would have sounded like in 2014? Let us know in the comments.

SXSW Music 2014: 20 acts to see

Angel-Olsen.jpg

The annual South By Southwest festival/conference/conventio-con is underway, with the music getting started in earnest on Tuesday and rolling headlong through Saturday night.

This year’s event has its share of big name visitors: Lady Gaga will be delivering the keynote address and performing, and the likes of Coldplay, Kendrick Lamar, Soundgarden, and Pitbull will be headlining a series of shows as part of the iTunes Festival.

But SXSW was originally designed as a showcase for new music, a place where baby bands could get their first big taste of exposure and where those artists who were about to break finally actually broke. EW will be on the ground covering acts both big and small, including these 20 on-the-cusp artists we’re going out of our way to check out.

Temples: Throwback psychedelia is hard to do, but this British quartet blends just the right amount of crushing beauty and off-kilter left turns.

Angel Olsen: In the grand tradition of PJ Harvey, Olsen marries muscular guitar with her delicate warble for blow-away blasts of folk-rock and power blues.

Perfect Pussy: Despite their censor-baiting name (and what honestly seems like a pretty standard-issue fuzz-punk sound), there’s a lot of buzz on this Syracuse foursome.

Sleepy Kitty: For fans of Sleigh Bells — but sub in post-grunge jangle for noisecore.

Cloud Nothings: Noisy Cleveland-based anarchists nearly made it big with their exceptional 2012 album Attack on Memory. Could the bigger, badder, forthcoming Here and Nowhere Else put them over the top?

Vertical Scratchers: Ultra-fuzzy indie jangle care of a pair of blissed out Californians.

SKATERS: Four New Yorkers who split the difference between driving punk surges and carefully-curated sonic tapestries, all wrapped in a whatever-man sneer.

ScHoolboy Q: Sure, he topped the charts with his latest album OxyMoron, but the top lieutenant in Kendrick Lamar’s army is ready to take the next step into household name-ness.

Chet Faker: The Australian’s downtempo bedroom R&B that would swerve dangerously into the cheese lane were it not for bearded mastermind Nick Murphy’s convincingly syrupy baritone.

You Blew It!: Don’t look now, but an emo revival is about to kick into gear, and this Orlando-based combo are the finest purveyors of the new pollution.

Oh Honey: Nothing but positive jams for this strummy, soulful Brooklyn duo. Like Matt & Kim with better production values.

READ FULL STORY

Bruno Mars on his tour playlist: Waka Flocka, Jake Bugg, Michael Jackson and more -- EXCLUSIVE

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This week’s cover star Bruno Mars is about to spend the next five months crisscrossing the globe on his massive Moonshine Jungle Tour — and man cannot live on backstage catering and laptop DVDs alone. He needs music!

We got Mars to tell us about the songs and albums that soundtrack his life on the road, and put it all in a Spotify player after the jump so you can tour the tunes for yourself.

JAKE BUGG
“He’s kind of got an Arctic Monkeys thing, who I love, but there are also some parts that remind me of Elvis. I think his song ‘Lighting Bolt’ has a very rockabilly, ‘50s like Elvis [vibe], and I like ‘Slide.’”

 WAKA FLOCKA FLAME
“We’ll put on the most ratchet music you can think of backstage. ‘O Let’s Do It’ by Waka Flocka was kind of our anthem for the last tour — every night before the show it’d be that one, so we’ll probably do it again, just for comfort reasons. We’ll jump around, taking shots — ‘Alright, let’s go!’ and then the curtain opens on a bunch of 14 year old girls. [laughs]” READ FULL STORY

George Jones: The Essential Playlist -- LISTEN

George Jones, who died today at 81, left behind an enormous body of work to sift through and enjoy. Here’s a smattering from his half-century-plus recording career to get you started. (You can also stream the full list at Spotify, after the jump.)

“White Lightning” (1959)
His first No. 1 song was an ode to bootleg booze—and fittingly, according to his 1996 autobiography, I Lived to Tell It All, it took him 80 takes to record vocals during a drunken day in the studio.

“Love Bug” (1965)
One of his more rockin’ hits captures the playful side of “the Possum” and features backup vocals by Jones protégé and bandmate Johnny Paycheck.

“The Door” (1974)
Another No. 1, on which Jones lists the most awful sounds he’s ever heard (“the sound of my dear old mama crying/And the sound of the train that took me off to war”)—but nothing hurts as bad as “that lonely sound, the closing of the door” when the girl he loves walks out of his life.

“These Days (I Barely Get By)” (1974)
One of the great low-down, everything-that-can-possibly-go-wrong-is-going-wrong songs.

“Golden Ring” (1976)
This No. 1 duet with Tammy Wynette (whom he divorced 14 months before the song’s release) tracks a wedding ring from a Chicago pawnshop to its new home with a happy young couple and eventually, when their marriage falls apart, its journey back to the pawnshop.

“I Ain’t Got No Business Doin’ Business Today” (1978)
In which Jones extols the virtues of playing hooky to make whoopee. READ FULL STORY

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