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Tag: Pop (51-60 of 1115)

Paramore's Hayley Williams on tour workouts, her new hair color, and the joys of not wearing latex

It’s a pretty great time to be in Paramore; their current single “Ain’t It Fun” represents their most successful hit yet, and they’re currently on the road with Fall Out Boy, co-headlining a summer run called the Monumentour. Singer Hayley Williams checked in recently to discuss her Warped Tour history, the value of kickboxing shorts, and the madness of playing Good Morning America.

Entertainment Weekly: You’re a few dates into the Monumentour. What do you know about the guys in Fall Out Boy that you didn’t know two weeks ago?
Hayley Williams: All those guys work out every day and we’re just getting in our dressing room eating chips. I told Patrick [Stump], “Thanks for making us all feel like the laziest buttholes.” He was like, “If I wasn’t doing this, I wouldn’t be able to move onstage. It’s so crucial.” I was like, “OK cool, maybe I’ll start up Ballet Beautiful in a minute.”

We’re all just so getting into tour mode that we really haven’t had a lot of time to hang out yet. We really have to find an off day to get a tour-wide dinner, with the bands and crews and everybody. Those guys are rad. It’s already so cool being on the same tour and sharing a bill and sharing a massive crowd of people who love both of our bands. It’s about time this tour happened. READ FULL STORY

The Breakdown: Robin Thicke's 'Paula' influences, by the numbers

Earlier this week, Robin Thicke released his seventh LP, Paula, just shy of a year after his last album, Blurred Lines. It’s been an eventful year for Thicke: “Blurred Lines” finally broke him with the mainstream American audience he had been courting relentlessly for a decade, his image has grown more salacious (helped out by his breakout single’s nudity-filled video and his on-stage freaking of Miley Cyrus at last year’s VMAs), and his wife of nearly nine years, Paula Patton, left him, apparently for reasons stemming from these developments.

As its title suggests, Paula is an album-length examination of their estrangement, as well as a pitch to convince Patton to reconcile. It’s the kind of flop-sweaty grand gesture that men have long been making when their partners finally get fed up with their nonsense, on an epic scale. A forgiving critic might call it “deeply personal,” but so far it’s mostly been called creepy and invasive, not to mention fundamentally flawed and misguided.

After the jump we’ll dig through this mess and figure out what it’s made from. READ FULL STORY

'Weird Al' Yankovic: The Stories Behind The Songs

For 35 years, “Weird Al” Yankovic has been music’s most reliable satirist, sending up the biggest pop hits and the most iconic artists for the sake of belly laughs. He’s about to release a brand new album called Mandatory Fun on July 15, so to prepare for a fresh batch of tunes we caught up with Yankovic to get the stories behind hits both big and small.  READ FULL STORY

Video: Get hooked on Tunde Olaniran's 'Critical'

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While many of his contemporaries work to cultivate an air of mystery through secret identities and un-Google-able stage names, Tunde Olaniran is generating a more intriguingly ambiguous vibe with a fraction of the effort. A native of Flint, Michigan, better known as Detroit’s less quaint sibling, Olaniran works in the gaps between hip-hop, R&B, dance music, and punk, weaving together aggressive beats, noisy electronics, and an intuitive knack for melody into a seamless, surprisingly pop-friendly whole. His recent five-song EP Yung Archetype sounds like Yeezus as a soul record, or if The-Dream made a record with TV on the Radio.

Last week Olaniran released a video for the brooding, spacious Yung Archetype track “Critical,” which he wrote for a family member who was diagnosed with cancer. It’s an emotionally intense four-and-a-half-minute ride, but I’ve had it on heavy rotation nonetheless. Hit the jump to get hooked. READ FULL STORY

Synthpop surrealists Baathhaus unveil the video for 'Ascension'

 Chicago quartet Baathhaus combines the transgressive glam surrealism of Lady Gaga with a synthpop sound redolent of vintage Erasure, New Order, and other popular acts at retro night at your local gay dance club. Over the past couple of years, they’ve started to accumulate the kind of cult following that an over-the-top theatrical pop band whose multimedia identity feels equally indebted to David Bowie and John Waters deserves, and as their audience has grown, their production values have increased to match.

Last week the group unveiled a new single, “Ascension,” on their SoundCloud, and now they’re ready to unveil the accompanying video. Unlike most Baathhaus productions, “Ascension” features no explosions of fake blood or glitter, but the band’s portrayal of a bourgeois suburban family and its teen daughter’s prom date is fraught with psychological tension. Member Dan Foley says, “The music video turns the lens on an everyday situation and shows us the dense and complex layers that can live inside of one simple moment. Longing, lust, anxiety, and the thrill of anticipation fill the quiet rooms of a suburban home and provide the perfect backdrop for the lush and shimmering pop of ‘Ascension.'”

Watch the exclusive video below.

READ FULL STORY

Rapper-turned-popster Kitty unveils new video for 'Marijuana'

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The Florida-born, NYC-based musician Kitty used to go by the name Kitty Pryde, and she used to be a rapper. Her 2012 song “Okay Cupid” was a pretty massive viral hit (its official video has nearly a million and a half views on YouTube) that brought her a decent amount of acclaim amidst an epic amount of hate from people who saw a young female rapper who didn’t seem interested in rapping about things that grouchy hip-hop fans are necessarily into as a sign of the impending apocalypse (or something).

Kitty still raps, but she’s broadened her overall approach and started moving toward straight-up pop, which considering the sing-songy flow she’s been showing off since “Okay Cupid” isn’t too drastic a leap. Last month she released an EP called Impatiens, which she quickly followed up with a new track, “Marijuana,” that now has a video. It’s her most successful stab at a pop song yet, with a bubbly, laid-back beat that fits the title well, plus a vocal part that ups the melodic quotient while still retaining just enough hip-hop inflection to make the track snap. The end result is a special kind of summer jam that forgoes the celebratory grooves that typify the genre in favor of an effortless chill that can act as mental air conditioning during ridiculously hot and humid days, which should come in handy very soon.

Check it out after the jump. READ FULL STORY

The Breakdown: Ed Sheeran's 'x' influences, by the numbers

This week’s biggest new release is British singer-songwriter Ed Sheeran’s x. Sheeran’s songwriting work for Taylor Swift and One Direction and acoustic pop style have earned him a fan base that’s heavy on younger listeners, but x (which is apparently meant to be pronounced “multiply”) deals with more mature themes, like the alienation that comes with fame and life on the road, as well as the ways sexual and chemical diversions can get away from you. People seem to be digging his new grown-up persona–our Melissa Maerz gave the album a B.

For this installment of the Breakdown we’ll take x apart and figure out what it’s made of. READ FULL STORY

Video: Enter the virtual reality of Groundislava and Rare Times' 'Feel the Heat'

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Groundislava is an LA-based electronic musician who’s part of the rapidly up-and-coming Wedidit Collective. Rare Times is an L.A.-based band that makes retro-minded pop that sounds like a bunch of George Michael remix B-sides that never actually existed. Sus Boy is a visual artist who’s gaining cult notoriety for making bizarro websites for the likes of Skrillex. Put them all together and you end up with the video to “Feel the Heat” from Groundislava’s brand new EP of the same name, which mashes up ’90s-style trip-hop with ’90s-style virtual reality and a heaping dose of very modern techno-paranoia. Keep your eye on all three parties involved–they’re bound to blow up soon.

READ FULL STORY

Listen to Grimes' new R&B-meets-EDM banger 'Go'

Synth-loving art-pop faerie Grimes has been on the verge of a major breakthrough ever since she released her 2012 album Visions, which refined the experimental electronic approach of her first two LPs and infused her sound with big, undeniable hooks that can stand up next to anything on the Top 40. It has stealthily become one of the most influential records of the past few years, and you can hear ideas borrowed from it all over the radio, including pretty much every synth-heavy pop song by a female performer that’s broken big in the past year.

Grimes herself has been patiently setting up her next move, signing to Jay Z’s Roc Nation for management and apparently fielding some songwriting gigs from major stars. Earlier this month at the Governor’s Ball festival in New York City she played a handful of new songs, including one that she claimed was written for, and rejected by, Rihanna. Today, she posted the finished recording of that track, entitled “Go,” on her SoundCloud. Produced with her longtime musical partner Blood Diamonds, it’s her most ambitiously accessible song yet, with an R&B-heavy vocal melody and arena-sized EDM synths that sound like they could have been lifted off of a Diplo track. It strongly hints that her next album (which she’s still working on) will be aimed straight at pop radio.

READ FULL STORY

AraabMuzik remixes Lana Del Rey's 'Summertime Sadness': Listen

NYC producer AraabMuzik is a virtuoso of the MPC whose freakish talent for making beats and remixing tracks on the fly has made him a jaw-dropping live performer in a field that often seems dominated by antisocial studio rats. In between blowing minds on stage he produces remixes that combine EDM’s electronic bombast with the sonic aggression of old-school NYC street rap, and just in time for both summer and the release of Lana Del Rey’s brand-new Ultraviolence, he’s dropped an arena-ready version of “Summertime Sadness” from her 2012 album Born to Die. It’ll appear on his upcoming mixtape For Professional Use Only 2, out July 15.

Stream it below: READ FULL STORY

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