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Tag: Punk (1-10 of 17)

Emo revivalists Joyce Manor share the soundtrack of their tour

One of the most heartening aspects of the ongoing emo revival is that most of the bands taking part in it seem to have not only inherited the sound of the genre’s ’90s-era second wave but the heavy streak of egalitarianism that was one of its primary non-musical qualities. That being said, Torrance, Calif.’s Joyce Manor enjoy something of a “first among equals” position, with a fan base that’s quickly growing to legitimate rock star size, a surprising amount of mainstream media attention, and a new album, Never Hungover Again, on the famed punk label Epitaph.

Never Hungover Again combines the earnestly awkward adolescent squawk of emo foundation-layers Cap’n Jazz with Cali pop-punk’s buzzsaw hooks, but on this exclusive playlist for EW, the band shows off some impressively diverse listening habits. Collecting some of the music that they’ve had in heavy rotation while on tour, it includes everything from ska-core heroes Operation Ivy to the Cocteau Twins’ gothy dream-pop.

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The power of failing: Chris Simpson revisits Mineral two decades later

Some of the most interesting, impactful artists are the ones few people know, who either weren’t around long enough to make a dent or just weren’t meant for bigger recognition. During its brief run in the mid- to late ’90s, Austin band Mineral released a pair of albums and toured relentlessly, playing small punk clubs and sharing bills with like-minded bands such as Jimmy Eat World, the Promise Ring, Christie Front Drive, and others who’d make up emo’s second wave. By the time Mineral released EndSerenading in 1998, the follow-up to 1997’s The Power of Failing, the band was done, and its members scattered to other projects. Yet it would leave a powerful legacy that transcended its small but devoted fan base. And it has apparently grown, judging by the response to Mineral’s reunion tour tied to the 20th anniversary of the band’s debut. They kick off this weekend in New York with a three sold-out shows and continue on and off in the U.S. and Europe through early next year. Before the band played its first show, Entertainment Weekly talked to singer-guitarist Chris Simpson about appreciating/cringing at his old songs and what revisiting them could mean for the future.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: What precipitated these shows?
CHRIS SIMPSON: A good friend of ours has been sort of hounding me and Jeremy [Gomez, bassist] for a while like, “You guys should really do some Mineral shows,” and we finally just started actually thinking about it. I remember when I realized that it would be 20 years from this year that we started the band, it sort of made me start to open my mind to like, “If we did this, this would be the time.” So yeah, it’s been a very long process so far, and I can’t believe that we haven’t played a note for anyone yet. [Laughs.] The whole thing isn’t even real yet.

Going back to these songs, what has struck you about them?
I have been surprised with the ease with which I’ve been able to connect with them emotionally for how old they are. But things are cyclical in life, and sometimes, in middle of life anyway, people tend to start looking back at themselves 20 years ago. It’s like you’re finally old enough to reflect back at an experience at this time. So I’ve been surprised in general that they’ve been as easy to connect with. But musically, they have been a beast. It’s just been so much work to get it all back together as far as guitar parts and guitar sounds. That’s been the primary labor.

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Hear The Clash's virtual reunion with EW's homemade Clash 'Black Album'

In one of the best and most talked-about sequences in Richard Linklater’s instant classic film Boyhood, Ethan Hawke gives Ellar Coltrane a homemade compilation he calls The Black Album. It consists of solo tracks from each of the four Beatles, sequenced in a way that captures the magic the band were able to make when they were still a cohesive unit. “Basically, I’ve put the band back together for you,” Hawke wrote in the liner notes.

It’s such a good idea that EW decided to steal it. There are countless bands who have broken up and never circled back around to a cash-grab reunion, and we’ve begun with one of my absolute favorites: The Clash. The group didn’t officially stick a fork in it until 1986, but the bloom was well off the rose by the time drummer Topper Headon left the group just prior to the release of 1982’s Combat Rock. The relationship between co-leads Mick Jones and Joe Strummer were hopelessly strained by the end, and by the time the group released the disastrous Cut the Crap in 1985, Jones was already deep into his second life as the frontman for Big Audio Dynamite.

Like the Beatles before them, the members of the Clash did make up and collaborate on an individual basis after they broke up, but they never got the band back together (and once Strummer suddenly passed away in 2002, that door was officially closed for good). Still, here are 19 tracks (the same number that appeared on the watershed London Calling) from the post-Clash lives of the core four that re-capture the spirit of what made them sonically and philosophically revolutionary.  READ FULL STORY

Released Pussy Riot member offers no regrets

One year after the band Pussy Riot staged an anti-President Vladimir Putin stunt in Moscow’s main cathedral that landed them in jail, a released band member said Thursday that she has no regrets.

Yekaterina Samutsevich told the Associated Press that she is glad that their punk performance made Russians more aware of the Orthodox Church’s close ties with the Russian government.

“I have no regrets about the performance,” she said in an interview outside Christ the Savior Cathedral. “Many people who did not know about the problem became aware of it: the problem in our society, in the Russian Church.” READ FULL STORY

Convicted Pussy Riot member petitions court to defer sentence

A member of feminist punk band Pussy Riot asked a Russian court on Wednesday to let her serve the rest of her two-year sentence when her 5-year-old son is a teenager, arguing that separation from her child now will do irreparable psychological damage.

Maria Alekhina is petitioning the court in Berezniki, a remote Ural mountains town near where she is imprisoned, to make the extremely rare decision to let her defer her sentence until her young son is 14.

She was convicted last year along with two other band members of hooliganism motivated by religious hatred for an anti-President Vladimir Putin stunt in Russia’s main cathedral. One of the women had her sentence suspended on appeal.

Alekhina told the court on Wednesday that while she wants her sentence deferred, she refused to plead guilty.

“No one will force me to say I’m guilty — I have nothing to repent for,” she said. READ FULL STORY

Russian P.M. urges Pussy Riot members' release

Russia’s prime minister says the women in the Pussy Riot punk band serving two-year prison sentences should be set free.

Three members of the band were convicted on hooliganism charges in August for performing a “punk prayer” at Moscow’s main cathedral, in which they pleaded with the Virgin Mary for deliverance from President Vladimir Putin.

One of them, Yekaterina Samutsevich, was released on appeal last month, but the other two, Nadezhda Tolokonnikova and Maria Alekhina, were sent to prison camps to serve their sentences.

Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev said Friday that he detested the Pussy Riot act, but added the women have been in prison long enough and should be released. He made a similar statement before October’s appeals hearings, fueling speculation about their possible release.

Read more:
Pussy Riot members sent to prison colonies
Russian court releases one Pussy Riot member, upholds sentences on two others
Russian prime minister thinks keeping Pussy Riot in jail is ‘unproductive’

Russian court releases one Pussy Riot member, upholds sentences on two others

A Moscow appeals court on Wednesday unexpectedly freed one of the jailed Pussy Riot members, but upheld the two-year prison sentence for the two others jailed for an irreverent protest against President Vladimir Putin.

All three women were convicted in August of hooliganism motivated by religious hatred. They argued in court on Wednesday that their impromptu performance inside Moscow’s main cathedral in February was political in nature and not an attack on religion.

The Moscow City Court ruled that Yekaterina Samutsevich’s sentence should be suspended because she was thrown out of the cathedral by guards before she could remove her guitar from its case and take part in the performance.

“The punishment for an incomplete crime is much lighter than for a completed one,” said Samutsevich’s lawyer, Irina Khrunova. “She did not participate in the actions the court found constituted hooliganism.” READ FULL STORY

Moscow court to hear Pussy Riot appeal -- UPDATE

A Russian court is set to hear an appeal filed by three jailed members of the rock band Pussy Riot, who have been sentenced to two years for performing a “punk prayer” against President Vladimir Putin at Moscow’s main cathedral.

A day before Monday’s hearing, the Russian Orthodox Church said the rockers would deserve mercy if they offer repentance for their stunt. The move followed a statement by the Russian premier, who said that keeping them in prison any longer would be “unproductive.”

The calls reflected an apparent desire by both the government and the church to put an end to the case, which has caused international outrage. It remained unclear whether the women would offer penitence sought by the church and how much leniency a court may show. UPDATE: The hearing has been postponed until Oct. 10. Full details below. READ FULL STORY

Russian prime minister thinks keeping Pussy Riot in jail is 'unproductive'

Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev on Wednesday called for three members of the punk band Pussy Riot to be freed, a sign that the women’s release could be imminent since their case comes up for appeal on Oct. 1.

The band members were arrested for performing a raucous prayer inside Moscow’s main cathedral asking Virgin Mary to save Russia from Vladimir Putin as he headed into the election that handed him a third term as president. They had already spent more than five months in jail when they were convicted in August of “hooliganism driven by religious hatred” and sentenced to two years in prison.

By being the one to call for the women’s release, Medvedev, who has cultivated the image of a more liberal leader, could allow Putin to put the uncomfortable case behind him while not appearing weak.

The outward appearance of the women, who perform in bright-colored miniskirts and balaclavas, and the “hysteria” accompanying them made him sick, Medvedev said with disdain. But he said keeping them in prison any longer would be “unproductive.”

“In my view, a suspended sentence would be sufficient, taking into account the time they have already spent in custody,” he said during a televised meeting with members of his United Russia party in the city of Penza. READ FULL STORY

'Free Pussy Riot Fest' held in Russia despite government pressure

A music festival to support jailed members of the Russian band Pussy Riot went forward despite official pressure to cancel it, organizers said Monday.

Olga Kurnosova said city officials had tried to force her to stop Sunday’s show in St. Petersburg — President Vladimir Putin’s hometown — and firefighters had threatened to close down the Glavklub hall, claiming safety violations ahead of the concert.

About 1,000 people attended the “Free Pussy Riot Fest” headlined by the Russian rock protest bands DDT and Televizor, whose songs have long riled Soviet authorities and Putin’s Kremlin. READ FULL STORY

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