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Tag: Q&A (1-10 of 105)

AC/DC's Angus Young on the band's first show and why he needs teleportation technology

Next year, AC/DC will celebrate the 40th anniversary of its first album the only way the band knows how: With a new album, Rock or Bust, and a forthcoming world tour that promises to be as big and loud as the box office-busting trek they went on a few years back in support of 2008’s Black Ice.

Rock or Bust may be a high-octane, party-hard collection of monster jams, but the men of AC/DC are no strangers to real world adversity—be it the death of original singer Bon Scott, the health issues that have forced guitarist Malcolm Young to step away from the band, or the recent legal woes of drummer Phil Rudd. But none of that will deter AC/DC—especially lead guitarist Angus Young, who has four decades of rock and roll under his belt because he has stuck to his guns (and his signature schoolboy outfit). He sat down with EW to talk about the new album, the recent upheavals, and why he always keeps an eye on the sky during “Hell’s Bells.”

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Flaming Lips frontman Wayne Coyne on the band's new Beatles cover album, late nights with Miley, and why he doesn't love weed

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In the three decades since Oklahoma psych-rock icons the Flaming Lips formed, they’ve made no secret of their love for twee, trippy antics. They’re particularly infamous for their over-the-top live shows, in which they perform in Martian or animal costumes and shower the audience with confetti while singer Wayne Coyne rolls over the crowd in a giant plastic bubble.

The Lips are fond of experimentation offstage as well, recording not just 13 studio albums but a slew of limited-edition releases and collaborations, including 2010’s song-for-song cover of Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon and a 2011 EP that was stored on a flash drive inside a gummy human skull. They’ve also dabbled in film, with projects like the bonkers 2008 holiday film Christmas on Mars and an inscrutable, NSFW five-minute short film, released earlier this year, called “Blonde SuperFreak Steals the Magic Brain.” In it, Miley Cyrus smokes a joint, a nude woman is sprayed with glitter, and Coyne sings from within a massive cardboard rainbow.

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Mary Lambert on moving on from Macklemore, crying with Madonna, and finding her own voice on her new album

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Not too long ago, Mary Lambert was tending bar in Seattle and following her muse as a spoken word artist in her spare time. A friend asked her to craft a hook for the independent hip-hop album he was working on—and then everything changed.

After the success of Macklemore & Ryan Lewis’s “Same Love,” Lambert found herself being courted by record labels, dueting with Madonna on stage at the Grammys, and moving to Los Angeles to record her full-length debut. READ FULL STORY

Record shopping with Interpol frontman Paul Banks

You might expect the leader of aughties postpunk overlords Interpol — who will release their first album in four years, El Pintor, on Sept. 9 — to be dour and aloof, or at least shrink away from bright sunlight. But the guy who strolls into Brooklyn’s Rough Trade Records on a sweltering August afternoon is friendly and voluble (and has a pretty brutal backspin, it turns out, on the store’s Ping-Pong table).

Over piles of vinyl and iced Americanos, Paul Banks, 36, talked with EW about the song that still gives him chills, his early obsessions with Nirvana and N.W.A, and the homemade mixtape that really freaked out his mom.

Sonic Youth,
Daydream Nation (1988)

“The first band that made me want to make music was Nirvana. So I was very aware of anything Nirvana-
affiliated, and I was watching an episode of 120 Minutes with them that Thurston Moore was hosting, and I remember thinking, ‘Who the f— is this dude that Nirvana keeps hanging out with? What’s the deal here?’ I
was very mindful of ‘Nirvana took this band out on tour, they must be someone I should know about.’

So I got [1990’s] Goo, which at that age didn’t really speak to me. But when I got to college, I got EVOL and Daydream Nation, which just… The textures and the guitar tones and the drive—I mean, some of the most beautiful guitar work of any rock songs ever is on this record. Insofar as one wants to emulate things as a musician, those were the things I wanted to emulate.” READ FULL STORY

Catching up with Spoon's Britt Daniel: An EW Q and A

The frontman of the beloved Austin indie-rockers—who’ve just returned with their eighth album, They Want My Soul, and recently hit the road with Arcade Fire—talks girl groups, long hiatuses, and literary heroes. (If you missed them this summer don’t worry; they’ve got a ton of dates left, including multiple festivals.)

EW: It’s been four years since Spoon last made a record. I know you’ve been working on other projects, but what’s been happening for you life-wise in the meantime?

Britt Daniel: Life wise? That’s a tough question. You’d think it’d be the easiest one, right? When we finished that last tour in November of 2011—it was at some festival in Germany—we kind of just said, “Well that’s the last show for awhile, and who knows what’s going to happen.” And we were all a little ground down at that point. It had just been too long that we were touring that record. So we went our separate ways without really saying anything. And I took three or four months of doing nothing really. I got a girlfriend and I just chilled. Which is the first I’ve done that in…I don’t know, it might have been the first time I’ve done that by choice. And then I met up with Dan [Boeckner], who’s an old friend of mine. He was doing a show in Portland and he was there for a few days. We talked about starting a band and we…started a band. READ FULL STORY

Arctic Monkeys frontman Alex Turner talks Bonnaroo

Nearly a decade after they achieved buzz-band status in America with arch Britpop ditties like “I Bet You Look Good on the Dancefloor” and “Fake Tales of San Francisco,” Arctic Monkeys have become bona fide stadium stars—literally.

Armed with a fuller, Josh Homme-assisted sound and a long-nurtured fan base, the band has graduated to sell-out crowds at venues like Madison Square Garden and L.A.’s Staples Center, both of which they’ll be playing on a massive tour this summer that includes a stop at Tennesee’s Bonaroo Music & Arts Festival this weekend.

We tracked down frontman Alex Turner, 28, on the road in Germany and got him to talk tequila, two-way pagers, and how .
EW: How have the Germans been treating you?
Alex Turner: I just got here. Did a sound check. Then a very nice German lady served me some beef stroganoff, and I was absolutely famished, so that went down a treat. I’m going to talk to you, then take a nap, and I’m going to go play a rock show. It’s not that bad a day, really. READ FULL STORY

Iggy Azalea on chicken franchising, Australian rap, and learning from Beyonce: An EW Q&A

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She’s still only 23, but it’s been a slow burn for Iggy Azalea. Born Amethyst Kelly, she left her home nation of Australia when she was 16 years old to pursue her hip-hop dreams. She’s been on the mix tape radar since 2011’s Ignorant Art, and has already teamed up with the likes of T.I., B.o.B, Mac Miller, Diplo, and Sean Paul.

Her proper debut album The New Classic has been in limbo for a while, but it’s finally hitting store shelves on April 18. Last week, EW caught up with Azalea in Manhattan Peruvian chicken emporium Pio Pio for a talk about art, nipples, and Katy Perry. 

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Spike Jonze previews this Sunday's YouTube Music Awards, featuring Eminem, Lady Gaga, and Arcade Fire

Director Spike Jonze has had a busy 2013: He produced Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa (currently the number one movie in the country), his next directorial effort Her is set to roll out at Christmas, and this Sunday, he’ll oversee the first ever YouTube Music Awards.

The show, which celebrates both high-octane stars and viral upstarts, will beam live from New York City’s Pier 36 and will feature performances by Eminem, Lady Gaga, and Arcade Fire. The whole thing will be hosted by Jason Schwartzman and Reggie Watts and will air live (naturally) on YouTube beginning at 6 p.m. Eastern on Sunday.

But what will the show actually look like, and how will it differentiate itself from the other music award shows crowding the calendar? Jonze spoke to EW about the process of putting it together, the goals for the evening, and more.

Entertainment Weekly: How long have you been working on this show? How did you get involved?
Spike Jonze: About six months ago, YouTube approached Vice and I about creating and producing their first music awards. It seemed like such a natural thing both for them and for me. I’ve always loved YouTube and the idea that anyone can make something and put it up. There’s no gatekeeper anymore—someone can just be creative and share it.

We came up with the idea that this night should be all about making things. So we’re giving awards to people who made things this year, but we’re also trying to make the whole awards show feel like a YouTube video. It’s about being creative and making things, and one of the main parts of that is we’re making live music videos with these artists, and as opposed to artists performing on a stage to an audience, though there might be some of that too if that’s the idea. It’s more about making these live videos in front of and with the audience that is there.

So will the artists be performing in full-scripted, narrative-type videos?
Some of them will be more straightforward performance videos, but some will be more conceptual. READ FULL STORY

Paramore's Hayley Williams on touring, Zedd, and fighting

Paramore have hit a lot of milestones this year: They released their first album as a trio, scored their first entry into the radio top 10 with the single “Still Into You,” and are about to embark on their biggest arena tour yet—including their first headlining spot at New York’s Madison Square Garden.

The trek kicks off tomorrow night in Seattle (complete dates are here), but before she packed for the road, singer Hayley Williams took some time out to talk about the new run, the damage done during the “Still Into You” video, and how she ended up on Zedd’s “Stay the Night.”

Entertainment Weekly: You’ve been at this a while, but these are some of the biggest rooms you’ve ever played coming up on this tour. Do you still get nervous?
Hayley Williams: I still get nervous. I get nervous before every show, even if it’s small. I just want everything to be perfect. We’re sort of perfectionists until we get out there, and then once we get out there, anything goes. I have really big butterflies — I’m kind of freaking out about all these rooms. I’m really excited and, like, throwing up in my mouth about Madison Square Garden.

So what sort of show are you putting on in Madison Square Garden?
Have you ever seen that war scene in Metallica’s show? We’re not doing that. [Laughs] We have never actually done a big production. We generally tend to show up on stage with our gear and a backdrop and some pretty lights. So we put a lot more thought into this show. The set list is longer; we’re playing almost two hours every night. I feel so old—I cannot believe we’re playing two hours a night! But when we’re playing it goes by so fast for me. READ FULL STORY

Joy Williams tries to explain the Civil Wars break-up: 'It's been a hard, painful season of my life'

They officially have the number-one record in the country this week — and one of the most-acclaimed albums of the year so far — but the Civil Wars’ Joy Williams and John Paul White won’t be touring to support it. In fact, the estranged duo are very famously not talking to one another at all. Williams did talk to EW, however, about making the album, separating truth from artistic license, and generally setting the record straight:

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Is it weird approaching every interview for your new record knowing you’ll have to address the hiatus?
JOY WILLIAMS:
Yeah, some days it’s really difficult just because I believe so much in the caliber of the music that we made that it’s hard for me that we can’t just focus on the music. That being said, I understand why people are curious about it. It’s something that I’m curious about, too, frankly. READ FULL STORY

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