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Tag: R.I.P. (1-10 of 55)

R.I.P. DJ E-Z Rock, the co-crafter of 1988 dance-rap classic 'It Takes Two'

Rodney Bryce, better known as DJ E-Z Rock, passed away on Sunday of as-yet unknown causes. He was 46 years old.

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Lord Infamous, rapper with Three 6 Mafia, has died

Groundbreaking rapper Ricky Dunigan, who rhymed under the name Lord Infamous, passed away on Friday night at his mother’s home in Memphis. He was 40 years old. The cause of death is currently unknown.

Dunigan helped form the Memphis-based rap collective Three 6 Mafia in 1991 alongside DJ Paul (Paul Beauregard) and Juicy J (Jordan Houston). Infamous drifted in and out of the group since its inception, and his most recent recording was a 2013 mixtape as a part of the group Da Mafia 6ix, which consisted of several members of Three 6 Mafia.

“R.I.P. lord infamous,” Juicy J wrote on Twitter on Saturday. Fellow Mafia member Gangsta Boo also tweeted out condolences. “Rest in Peace Lord Infamous please respect the family and dear friends during this tragedy. I will never forget the shows we rocked together . My heart is in pieces.”

Infamous had suffered a heart attack and a stroke in 2010, though a statement from Infamous’ publicist indicated that it was unclear whether or not his health issues played into his passing.

Da Mafia 6ix were scheduled to release their proper debut album in 2014.

Velvet Underground's John Cale on Lou Reed: 'I've lost my school-yard buddy'

Though they founded the Velvet Underground together and collaborated on and off for nearly half a century, Lou Reed and John Cale had a relatively contentious relationship over the course of their intertwined careers. (As recently as earlier this year, Cale expressed consternation over Reed reviving their Andy Warhol tribute project Songs For Drella.)

But that was put aside following the news of Reed’s passing. Cale took to his Facebook page yesterday to express his thoughts on his former bandmate in the wake of his death. “The world has lost a fine songwriter and poet,” Cale wrote. “I’ve lost my ‘school-yard buddy.'”

Reed, Cale, Sterling Morrison and drummer Maureen Tucker launched the Velvet Underground in the mid 1960s and produced two albums together—1967’s The Velvet Underground and Nico and 1968’s White Light/White Heat—before Cale was replaced by Doug Yule for the band’s 1969 self-titled album. Cale and Reed clashed over control of the band and its direction, with Cale always trying to pull more and more into the droning sounds of tracks like “Venus In Furs.”

Since leaving the Velvet Underground, Cale had a moderately successful solo career (his signature album, 1973’s Paris 1919, is a classic of the genre) and has also done well as a producer, primarily for late former VU chanteuse Nico.

In 1989, Reed and Cale came together following the death of mutual friend and mentor Andy Warhol. The pair had not spoken to one another for years before Warhol’s memorial service in 1987, and they reunited in 1990 to write a song cycle about Warhol called Songs For Drella. Though they didn’t tour, they did make a concert film shot by ace cinematographer Ed Lachman, which is hard to find but well worth seeing. Cale and Reed last worked together on the Velvet Underground reunion tour in 1993.

Reed passed away yesterday, October 27. The cause of death has still yet to be announced, though he had recently undergone surgery for a liver transplant.

Singer and producer Romanthony, best known for Daft Punk's 'One More Time,' has died

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Singer, DJ, and house music producer Anthony Moore, who went by the stage name Romanthony, passed away last week at his home in Austin at the age of 46. His family confirmed his passing today, and said the cause was kidney disease.

Though he released four albums of his own, Romanthony is best known as the voice behind Daft Punk’s “One More Time.” Though it was completed in 1998, the track wasn’t released as a single until 2000, and later appeared on Daft Punk’s 2001 album Discovery. (Moore also provided vocals for the album’s closing track, “Too Long.”)

Moore also operated his own label, Black Male Records, through which he released his albums and singles. His music was nominally all filed under the “house” genre, but it was hardly confined to it, also reaching into techno, funk, hip-hop, and beyond.

Listen to “One More Time” and Romanthony’s solo release “Make This Love Right (Tronic Dub)” below:

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Jason Molina of Songs: Ohia and Magnolia Electric Co. dies at 39

Jason Molina, the musician behind beloved indie-rock outfits Songs: Ohia and Magnolia Electric Co., died from organ failure on Saturday at his home in Indianapolis. He was 39.

Molina’s death, Chunklet reports, was caused by years of alcohol abuse, which the musician had been dealing with publicly. Molina’s last few years included numerous stints in rehab centers in America and England, and Pitchfork reports that his family members had set up a fund in 2011 for fans wanting to contribute to his medical costs.

In May of last year, Molina posted a statement on Magnolia Electric Co.’s website acknowledging his struggle but letting fans know that he was improving. It was his last public comment about his health:

Treatment is good, getting to deal with a lot of things that even the music didn’t want to. I have not given up because you, my friends have not given up on me. I do still need your support however that takes shape, good vibes are worth more than you might think.

Molina released his most recent album in 2012, the  solo effort Autumn Bird Songs. His body of work includes more than two decades of music created under various names — most of it released on his longtime label, Secretly Canadian.

The label issued an emotional statement on its website; you can read it in full below:

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Chris Lighty, manager of stars like Mariah Carey, LL Cool J, and Diddy, has died at 44

Chris Lighty, the hip-hop impresario and manager of the likes of Busta Rhymes, 50 Cent, and Diddy, has died. He was 44 years old.

According to a report in the New York Daily News, Lighty took his own life in his Bronx apartment this morning following an argument with his ex-wife. Though details remain scarce, authorities do know that he and his wife divorced last year, and that he may have owed as much as $5 million to the IRS in unpaid taxes.

At the turn of the century, being managed by Lighty and his Violator Entertainment shingle was a prestigious get — some of the biggest names in the music industry came under his guidance, including Mariah Carey, Missy Elliott, LL Cool J, Nas, and Ja Rule.

He began his career under the tutelage of Lyor Cohen and Russell Simmons as Rush Management in the late ’80s, later setting up Violator as one of the early multi-pronged management companies. They produced two compilations (Violator: The Album, and Violator: The Album, V2.0), which featured the likes of Q-Tip (performing his breakout solo single “Vivrant Thing”), Fat Joe, Mobb Deep, Cam’Ron, Cee-Lo, and Mase.

There was rarely a rap star from that era who didn’t come in contact with Lighty, who was known as a fair and savvy navigator of the ever-tumultuous waters of the hip-hop world, and he will undoubtedly be missed.

Read More on EW.com:
Review: Violator: The Album
Review: Violator: The Album, V2.0

No Use For a Name singer Tony Sly dead at 41

Tony Sly, singer and chief songwriter for veteran California pop punk band No Use For a Name, has passed away at age 41. His cause of death has yet to be released.

In a statement posted to the band’s label’s website, Fat Wreck Chords founder and NoFX frontman Fat Mike said, “One of my dearest friends and favorite song writers has gone way too soon. Tony, you will be greatly missed.”

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Funk Brothers bass player Bob Babbitt dies at 74

Prominent Motown studio musician and Funk Brothers member Bob Babbitt, whose bass playing pounded through the Temptations hit “Ball of Confusion” and Marvin Gaye’s “Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology),” has died. He was 74.

Babbitt died Monday of complications from brain cancer in Nashville, Tenn., where he had lived for many years, his manager David Spero said in a statement released by Universal Music, the label in which Babbitt contributed to numerous hit records.

Well-known for decades among musicians, Babbitt laid down bass lines on Stevie Wonder’s “Signed, Sealed, Delivered,” along with “The Tears of a Clown” by Smokey Robinson and the Miracles, “Inner City Blues” by Marvin Gaye, and Edwin Starr’s “War.”

“Bob was a teddy bear of a guy,” former Motown engineer Ed Wolfrum told the Detroit Free Press. “And he was an extraordinary musician — a player’s player.” READ FULL STORY

Deep Purple co-founder Jon Lord dies

Jon Lord, the keyboardist and co-founder of Deep Purple, has died. He was 71 years old, and according to reports had been receiving treatment for pancreatic cancer since last year.

As a member of Deep Purple, Lord played on all the band’s definitive hits, including their breakout cover of Billy Joe Royal’s “Hush” (Lord’s vibey organ playing gave the song its haunting psychedelic quality) and on the iconic smash “Smoke on the Water,” which he also co-wrote.

All told, Deep Purple sold over 100 million albums worldwide, and the bulk of that business was done during Lord’s first tenure with the band, which lasted from the group’s inception in 1968 until the band collectively went on hiatus in 1976. He rejoined when the group reconstituted in 1984 and retired from the group for good in 2002.

In addition to his work with Deep Purple, Lord also worked with Whitesnake and found considerable success as a classical composer, penning a handful of well-received concertos mostly during the Deep Purple hiatus in the late ’70s.

Through his keyboard work in Deep Purple, Lord is often credited as the artist who made it reasonable for hard rock bands to incorporate strings, horns, and keys into their sounds, leading to the multiplatinum hybrid sounds of bands like Def Leppard and Bon Jovi.

In honor of Lord, check out this clip of him and the rest of Deep Purple playing “Hush” on a 1968 episode of Playboy After Dark: READ FULL STORY

Crowded House drummer Pete Jones passes away at 45

Pete Jones, the drummer for Australian band Crowded House, passed away on Friday after a long battle with brain cancer. He was 45 years old.

“We are in mourning today for the death of Peter Jones,” the surviving band members wrote in a statement on their website. “We remember him as a warm hearted, funny and talented man, who was a valuable member of Crowded House. He played with style and spirit. We salute him and send our love and best thoughts to his family and friends.”

Formed in 1985 following the breakup of Split Enz, Crowded House scored immediate hits in their native Australia and found international success with their 1986 self-titled debut, which contained “Don’t Dream It’s Over,” the band’s biggest success.

Jones didn’t join the band until 1994, just in time for their break up. He appeared on the band’s live album Farewell to the World, recorded on the steps of the Syndey Opera House in 1996 as the band’s farewell show.

Read more on EW.com:
Bee Gees singer Robin Gibb dies at age 62
Donna Summer has died at 63
Chuck Brown, pioneer of go-go funk music, has died at 75

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