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Tag: Red Hot Chili Peppers (1-10 of 21)

Red Hot Chili Peppers mimed Super Bowl song, Flea admits

The Red Hot Chili Peppers decided long ago they were never going to mime a live performance. The band made an exception for the NFL, it turns out.

The group’s bassist, Flea, said in a letter to fans posted on the group’s website Tuesday that the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame members pretended to play along to a pre-taped track of “Give It Away” during the Super Bowl halftime show as Anthony Kiedis sang live. The request came from NFL officials who felt it was too difficult to pull off a completely live performance because of potential sound issues.

The admission came after observers noted Flea and his bandmates weren’t plugged in while performing Sunday at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J.

Flea wrote on the band’s website that the opportunity was too big for the lifelong football fans to turn down. After internal debate, checking with fellow musicians and consulting with headliner Bruno Mars, they decided it was “a surreal-like, once in a life time crazy thing to do and we would just have fun and do it.”

The 51-year-old said the group prerecorded a unique instrumental track for the show. He didn’t directly address whether Mars also recorded instrumental tracks for his appearance, though he said Mars was aware they did. A publicist for Mars did not immediately respond to an email requesting comment.

A record 115 million people tuned into watch Mars and the Peppers, besting audiences of 114 million for Madonna and 110 million for Beyonce.

If the Red Hot Chili Peppers weren't plugged in during the Super Bowl, does it matter?

Sunday night’s Super Bowl Halftime Show with Bruno Mars and the Red Hot Chili Peppers was reasonably entertaining, if unremarkable. Still, that didn’t stop it from being the most watched halftime show in history, beating out the numbers for more memorable performances by Madonna and Beyoncé.

Inevitably, close watchers of the broadcast noticed that neither Flea’s bass nor Josh Klinghoffer’s guitar appeared to be plugged in to anything. It was first pointed out by Living Colour guitarist Vernon Reid, who tweeted “That guitar is plugged into NOTHING” during the show. Photo evidence seemed to back him up, and though there was a stirring online debate about whether or not the Peppers could have been using wireless transmitters, Reid set the world straight. “There were NO wireless packs,” he tweeted. “Which would be a nightmare given the huge amount of wireless channels. They leave NOTHING to chance.”

His last point is the most pertinent: For a show in an outdoor stadium that size, and with so little time to turn everything around, prerecording in those settings has been the norm for decades. Vocals are a little easier to deal with, but it’s near-impossible to wrangle multiple instruments thanks to delay and echo-related complications. (People were also pointing out that Mars’ horn section wasn’t actually making noise either.) And it’s not like a completely different group of musicians recorded “Give It Away” for the Chili Peppers—in these situations, they usually record a version live to perform to.

Not that there’s been much outrage over the revelation that Flea was playing air bass. Remember when Beyoncé lip-synced “The Star-Spangled Banner” and everybody lost their minds? READ FULL STORY

Bruno Mars shimmies and slides through Super Bowl halftime set -- VIDEO

With nary a middle finger or nipple shield in sight, pop star Bruno Mars took the Super Bowl halftime stage tonight with a polished, shiny set oddly interrupted for a moment by shirtless 50-year-olds. Donning his signature suit (tonight was metallic gold) and skinny tie — but no fedora, dammit – flanked by a pack of identically adorned band members, Bruno and his crew aptly struck a very “Jersey Boys” look through their five-song halftime set at MetLife Stadium.

READ FULL STORY

Bask in the brilliance of the Nine Inch Nails parody 'This Is A Trent Reznor Song'

If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, then Frederick Scott just paid Nine Inch Nails mastermind Trent Reznor the ultimate compliment.

Scott’s “This Is a Trent Reznor Song” is a spot-on homage to Reznor, who Scott described on Twitter as “one of my musical heroes.” In a track that ends up sounding an awful lot like Reznor’s Hesitation Marks single “Came Back Haunted,” Scott narrates the construction of a typical NIN tune, pointing out the esoteric percussion, weird noises, and the escalating nature of Reznor’s voice.

Anybody who has spent quality time with The Downward Spiral or The Fragile will understand. Listen below: READ FULL STORY

Red Hot Chili Peppers, Phoenix, Blur and Stone Roses in Coachella lineup

The Red Hot Chili Peppers, Phoenix, Blur and The Stone Roses are set to headline Coachella 2013.

The Postal Service, Wu-Tang Clan and Vampire Weekend are among the other acts scheduled to perform. Click below for the full lineup or check out Coachella.com. READ FULL STORY

Dave Grohl to host limited-run show on SiriusXM

Image Credit: Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/GettyImages

Dave Grohl’s ready to pay tribute to the recording studio that helped launch his career.

Starting on Thursday, the Foo Fighters frontman will host “Dave Grohl Presents Sound City,” a series of shows on SiriusXM that celebrate the output of California’s Sound City Studios. There are nine shows in total, each focusing on a different epoch in the studio’s history from 1970 to 2011.

“I’m grateful to SiriusXM for giving me the opportunity to share all this great music and to let people know what got me excited about Sound City in the first place,” Grohl said in a press release.

READ FULL STORY

On the scene at Lollapalooza Saturday: Stormy weather leads to good vibrations for Frank Ocean and Red Hot Chili Peppers

By Kyle Anderson and Nolan Feeney

When the second day of Lollapalooza 2012 began on Saturday, it was just another ridiculously hot morning in Chicago—but by the time the final notes had been played in Grant Park, it had become historic.

For the first time ever, the entire festival was suspended due to inclement weather, and all of the festival’s attendees—the official number at the time of the storm was 60,000, plus 3,000 staff—were evacuated for two and a half hours while a vicious thunderstorm passed through.

At about three o’clock local time, word started spreading that a nasty storm front was headed in the direction of Grant Park, and that everybody should brace themselves for the worst. Only a few minutes later, the organizers of Lollapalooza did the bracing for everybody.

A number of bands, including Neon Indian, were forced to end their mid-afternoon sets early to make way for the announcement that everybody had to leave the grounds due to the oncoming weather. What at first seemed like an alarmist case of over-protection ended up being right on, as the wind and rain ripped through Downtown Chicago for a solid hour.

The festival attendees who didn’t fill the bars and restaurants surrounding Grant Park were lead to a trio of underground parking garages that served as shelters during the storm.

The gates were re-opened at around six o’clock, with a new schedule and a slightly extended curfew. Most everybody was allowed to go on later, with the headlining acts given the go-ahead to play until 10:45, just under the cutoff time for noise in Grant Park. In the end, only a handful of acts were cancelled outright, including Temper Trap, Alabama Shakes, Chairlift, the Dunwells, B.o.B., J.J. Grey and Mofro, and Paper Diamond.

By the time the music was back on, the crowd had thinned only a little; most people seemed to stick out the storm. Though the fields had deteriorated quite a bit — a number of people standing in front during the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ set were in ankle-deep water).

Still, the resilience of the crowd (and the cooler temperatures post-storm) definitely played into both of Saturday night’s headliners. READ FULL STORY

Lollapalooza 2012: Five questions going into the weekend

This weekend, the music world once again turns its annual attention to Chicago’s Grant Park, where Lollapalooza will spread its freaky tentacles across eight stages, dozens of food booths, and countless pairs of ruined shoes.

(If you’re not there, you may miss the falafel and the mud, but you can still watch nearly all of the performances on your laptop via the Dell-sponsored livestream and archive on YouTube,)

This year’s headliner crop is a weird collision of veteran rockers (Black Sabbath, Red Hot Chili Peppers), huge dance artists (Justice, Avicii, Kaskade), and extra-emotive folks from the hip-hop world (Frank Ocean, Wale, Childish Gambino).

With the undercard full of the usual indie-fied suspects, Lollapalooza 2012 looks a lot like the eclectic stew of alternative energy that Perry Farrell first envisioned when he invented the thing in 1991.

With that in mind, there are a handful of questions going into Lollapalooza weekend that should be resolved by the time Jack White plays his last note on Sunday night. Here are the five you need to consider at the dawn of the weekend.

Is this my last chance to see Black Sabbath?
It’s possible, though technically this isn’t actually the full Black Sabbath, as drummer Bill Ward elected to stay home on this particular reunion jaunt. READ FULL STORY

Neil Young, Red Hot Chili Peppers to headline Austin City Limits

The Red Hot Chili Peppers, Neil Young and Crazy Horse, and Florence + the Machine are three of the biggest names slated to play the 2012 Austin City Limits Music Festival. The entire 130-act strong lineup was announced for the October event. Click below for the rest of the talent: READ FULL STORY

Red Hot Chili Peppers play special show for Obama volunteers- VIDEO

About 12 hours after being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, the Red Hot Chili Peppers gave it away, gave it away, gave it away… for Obama campaign volunteers at Cleveland’s House of Blues. As Cleveland’s Plain Dealer writes, the band performed a special 45-minute concert for 1,200 liberal-minded music lovers. Tickets were free, provided a would-be concert-goer had worked in an Obama phone bank.

A video montage of Obama speeches paved the way for Anthony Kiedis, Flea, Chad Smith, and Josh Klinghoffer’s set. In between hits like “Under the Bridge” and “Can’t Stop,” Kiedis urged the audience to register voters and declared his support for our 44th president. From Blood Sugar Sex Magik to stumping for a sitting POTUS — who says a rocker’s edge dulls with age? READ FULL STORY

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