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Tag: Ringo Starr (1-10 of 10)

The Beatles Grammy Salute performances: The good, the bad, and the tacky from John Mayer, Brad Paisley, Pharrell, Adam Levine and more

“I was wondering if it was seemly to tribute yourself,” said Sir Paul McCartney in the most quotable moment from last night’s prerecorded CBS special, “The Beatles: The Night That Changed America—A Grammy Salute.” Naturally, it was “a couple of American guys” who convinced him that awards-show-style indulgence was called for on the 50th anniversary of The Ed Sullivan Show bringing Beatlemania to these United States. But when Paul—and, let’s not forget, Ringo Starr—finally performed, they did it with such earnestness, good humor, and energy that all the self-congratulation seemed crowded out. The bummer was that the Yanks who covered Beatles songs in the two hours leading up to this casually historic finale missed a big fat opportunity to inject more tacky, over-the-top American spirit into the proceedings. The lusty screams of young women in cat-eye glasses seemed distant indeed.

Although we must recognize Adam Levine and John Mayer for bringing a louche, careless, cruise-ship vibe to “Ticket to Ride” and “Don’t Let Me Down,” respectively. Especially Mayer, who, with his appealing voice and hobo-stylist look, took his bittersweet selection to an irreverent climax, trading guitar faces with Keith Urban, his sleekly metrosexual partner. Honorable mentions go to Katy Perry, who gave “Yesterday” a literal representation in the form of her retro dress, with its yards and yards of flowery fabric (fashion scolds attacked this choice when they first spotted it on the red carpet); and the louchest of them all, Joe Walsh, who popped up in a couple places, wailing on his guitar and reminding everyone that rock excess endures even when it disdains mind expansion—and that this can be groovy, too. READ FULL STORY

'The Beatles: The Night That Changed America': Why 'Ed Sullivan Show' was more than a musical moment -- VIDEO

When The Beatles performed on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964, I wasn’t alive, but I knew exactly who to ask about the Brits’ American television debut: my mom. She described sitting at home at age 11 with her family, and as each song played — “All My Loving,” “She Loves You,” “I Saw Her Standing There,” “I Want to Hold Your Hand” — she inched closer to the edge of the couch. Then she slid down the couch to be closer to the TV. Then she was cross-legged on the floor. Then she had her face right up by the screen. She needed to be as close as possible to the Fab Four and their music — and she wasn’t alone.

More than 73 million Americans gathered around their televisions on the night of Feb. 9, 1964, and on Sunday at 8 p.m. ET, exactly 50 years later to the day and time, The Beatles: The Night That Changed America — A Grammy Salute will bring us back to that magical night. The two-and-a-half-hour show includes the band’s famous fans performing their biggest hits; interviews with those involved in the Sullivan telecast, including David Letterman’s sit-down with Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr (check out a preview below); and a Beatles reunion performance.

But it was so much more than just a musical moment. As the show’s producer, Ken Ehrlich, told EW, the country was searching for something to rally around after months of tragedy.
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Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr reunite onstage at the Grammys -- VIDEO

Surviving Beatles Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr reunited onstage at the 2014 Grammys, performing McCartney’s new song “Queenie Eye,” aka “The song with that weird Kate Moss/Johnny Depp/Meryl Streep video.” It was actually the second time both men were onstage: Starr performed his solo song “Photograph” earlier in the show, while McCartney had accepted the Grammy for Best Rock Song alongside Dave Grohl for “Cut Me Some Slack.” READ FULL STORY

Ringo Starr talks Beatles days with Russell Brand... but is there anything we don't already know?

A trim and tan Ringo Starr regaled a select group of fans yesterday in at a SiriusXM “Town Hall” held the Troubadour in Los Angeles, to promote the release of his new studio album Ringo 2012, out today. If you didn’t know the former Beatle was 71 years old, you would not have believed it — rarely has a septuagenarian rock star looked this good. He gamely bantered with host Russell Brand, who has held back on a sex joke. “The whole day is sort of designed to elicit relentless ejaculation,” Brand told the crowd at the Troubadour before the event began. (“If I talk about relentless ejaculation now,” Brand added, apparently talking to a SiriusXM producer, “it probably won’t be part of the broadcast.”)

Sex jokes aside, a great deal of the hour-long audience Q&A — the second half of which was moderated by music producer Don Was — was spent on Beatles nostalgia, from reminiscing about their final rooftop concert (yesterday was that event’s 43rd anniversary, a fact that took Starr by surprise), all the way back to when the drummer would watch the Beatles perform before he’d joined the band. READ FULL STORY

Ringo Starr's 70th birthday concert: Guests galore, and Paul McCartney, too!

Ringo-Starrs-70th-birthdayImage Credit: Kevin Mazur/WireImage.comThe cake had been served, the candles had been blown out, and Ringo Starr had all but told the sold-out crowd at NYC’s Radio City Music Hall to go home, but the most exciting part of his 70th birthday show last night was still to come. That was the exact moment, right around 10 p.m., that none other than Paul McCartney bounded on stage in his skinny tie and fitted suit. The art-deco hall filled with 1964-style squeals as Sir Paul tore through the Beatles’ “Birthday” with the wild-eyed drive of someone decades younger.

McCartney’s unannounced appearance was the perfect end to an evening of festive collaboration. Ringo calls his touring act the All-Starr Band for a reason: They’re all handpicked veterans of bands from the ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s. In between his solo hits (“Photograph,” “It Don’t Come Easy”) and Beatles classics (“Yellow Submarine,” “Act Naturally,” “Boys”), he gave each of his bandmates ample time to demonstrate their own claims to fame. Keyboardist/saxophonist Edgar Winter led electrifying renditions of “Frankenstein” and “Free Ride.” Guitarist Rick Derringer of the McCoys rocked “Hang On Sloopy.” The Romantics’ Wally Palmar told us “What I Like About You.” Mr. Mister’s Richard Page spread his “Broken Wings.” Gary Wright crooned “Dreamweaver,” which he said was inspired by a book on Eastern philosophy that George Harrison once gave him. (“George Harrison never gave me no damn book,” cracked Ringo.) I’m not sure I’d sit through an entire concert by any of those guys’ original groups, but seeing them run through their hits with Ringo was fun — a classic-rock radio revue with one of history’s greatest beat-keepers behind the kit. Starr himself was as energetic as any 70-year-old I’ve ever encountered, grooving gamely at front stage or drumming with that familiar head-bobbing enthusiasm. READ FULL STORY

Ringo Starr: Happy 70th birthday!

ringo-starr-birthdayImage Credit: John Shearer/WireImage.com; Cake: Stone Sub/Getty ImagesLet’s all wish a hearty “Happy birthday!” to Ringo Starr, who was born Richard Starkey exactly 70 years ago today. This milestone will no doubt make many people other than the legendary drummer feel old. Easy solution: Throw on a Beatles album, or better yet, find A Hard Day’s Night on DVD. The world has yet to discover a superior source of renewable youthful energy than the twentysomething Starr’s steady drumbeats and silly faces.

Perhaps you think Ringo is owed a birthday gift of some sort in return for this legacy of awesomeness. What do you get a 70-year-old Beatle — a yellow submarine? Maybe just a nicely framed photograph? Luckily, the man himself has already anticipated this question. In a video posted on his official site, he asks fans around the world to say the words “Peace and Love” and flash a peace sign at 12 noon today in their respective time zones. Get ready!

Check out Starr’s birthday video after the jump, then share your best wishes in the comments section. While you’re at it, let us know your favorite Ringo music moments, whether from the Beatles or his long and successful solo career.

MORE: Ringo Starr’s 70th birthday concert: Guests galore, and Paul McCartney, too!

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Ringo Starr brushes off Vatican's forgiveness: 'They've got more to talk about than the Beatles'

Ringo-StarrImage Credit: Jon Furniss/WireImage.comRingo Starr is responding to the Vatican’s olive branch with a pointed wisecrack. To recap: In 1966, John Lennon sardonically remarked that the Beatles had become more popular than Jesus Christ Himself. Various religious authorities, including the Vatican, issued furious if ineffectual denunciations at the time. This week, the Vatican’s official newspaper, L’Osservatore Romano, announced that forgiveness has been granted at last. Evidently the Beatles’ “beautiful melodies,” which “live on like precious jewels,” outweigh the Fab Four’s “dissolute and uninhibited lives” in the Vatican’s eyes.

So what does Ringo think of all this? “Didn’t the Vatican say we were satanic?” the drummer replied pithily when asked by a CNN interviewer. “Possibly satanic, and they still forgive us. I think the Vatican — I think they’ve got more to talk about than the Beatles.” Zing!

Watch Ringo Starr’s full CNN interview (the Vatican question comes around the 5:40 mark) and let us know what you think of Ringo’s response.

(Follow the Music Mix on Twitter @EWMusicMix.)

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'Yellow Submarine' casting rumors: Darth Maul IS Paul McCartney?

According to the Hollywood Reporter, a quartet of actors are in negotiations to portray The Beatles in director Robert Zemeckis’ planned 3D remake of the 1968 film Yellow Submarine. The four thespians are Princess Bride star Cary Elwes who is apparently in the frame to impersonate George Harrison, Dean Lennox Kelly from the UK dramedy Shameless who will tackle John Lennon, Epic Movie actor Adam Campbell who will negotiate Ringo’s nasal vowels, and Peter Serafinowicz who will take on Paul McCartney. Serafinowicz’s credits include Shaun of the Dead, Couple’s Retreat, and the fantastic fake science show Look Around You, though there is a strong possibility that the words “He was the voice of Darth Maul” may appear on the Brit actor’s gravestone.

All in all, that seems like a line-up capable of handling the Fab Four’s Liverpudlian twang. They’re all Brits and Serafinowicz, in particular, is an accent master and Liverpool-raised to boot. Meanwhile, anyone crying “Foul!” over the idea of people impersonating John, Paul, George and Ringo, may care to note that the Beatles’ animated avatars in the original movie were also voiced by actors, with the Beatles themselves only contributing to a live action sequence at the end (see below).

Are you a big fan of the original movie? What do you think of these rumored casting choices? All together now!

(Follow the Music Mix on Twitter: @EWMusicMix.)

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Photo Credit: Everett Collection

'The Beatles: Rock Band' is out today: Harmonix boss Alex Rigopulos gives us the scoop on working with Sir Paul and NOT being given hell by Yoko

beatles-rock-band-Rigopulos_lIt was 30 years ago today that Alex Rigopulos, co-founder of the video game company Harmonix, first heard the Beatles play. Well, roughly. “I think I was around 7 or 8 when I discovered my first Beatles album, which was Sgt. Pepper,” says Rigopulos, 39. “It was really the first rock album that meant anything to me. For as long as we’ve been making music games, the prospect of working in some capacity with the Beatles material has been looming out there on the horizon as a dream project.” That dream is now a reality. As observant EW readers will be aware, the MTV-owned Harmonix is today releasing The Beatles: Rock Band, the latest in its line of hugely successfully Rock Band games.

After the jump, Rigopulos reveals all about the “nerve-wracking” development of this season’s essential video game.

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Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr reunite onstage for David Lynch's 'Change Begins Within' concert

Paulringo_lOn any other occasion, David Lynch and Laura Dern chatting onstage about the making of Blue Velvet would be worthy of full attention. Not so last night at New York City’s Radio City Music Hall, when there was a Beatles reunion in the wings. We could hear Paul McCartney tuning up behind the curtain for his headlining set at the David Lynch Foundation’s “Change Begins Within” benefit concert. Ringo Starr had played a rollicking mini-set of his own just a few minutes earlier. Still, there had been no rock-solid confirmation that the two living Beatles would perform together last night. When Dern and Lynch walked off and the curtain went up, it was for Macca to play a Beatles-heavy solo show (full set list after the jump). He was in high spirits and excellent form. But we all got what we were really waiting for at the end of McCartney’s set, when he introduced an old mate named Billy Shears to join him on “With A Little Help From My Friends.” It’s a good thing Radio City has such a powerful sound system. Otherwise you’d never have heard the Fab Two singing that familiar melody together over the crowd’s wild roar.

It made sense that David Lynch, master of the awesomely surreal, was responsible for the fairly surreal, indescribably awesome experience of seeing Paul and Ringo reunite for the first time in over six years. The filmmaker organized last night’s concert to raise awareness and funds for the David Lynch Foundation for Consciousness-Based Education and World Peace, a charity that works to promote the late Maharishi Mahesh Yogi’s Transcendental Meditation technique. This gave the evening special resonance for me, since my favorite Beatles work is the self-titled White Album, written mostly during the band’s 1968 trip to Rishikesh, India, to study TM with Maharishi. Also present at that famed ashram stay were folkie Donovan and jazz flutist Paul Horn, both of whom performed earlier in last night’s crowded bill, as well as Beach Boy Mike Love, who spoke briefly. Other performers, all strong, included Bettye LaVette, Moby, Sheryl Crow, Eddie Vedder, Ben Harper, My Morning Jacket’s Jim James, and Lynch’s longtime scorer Angelo Badalamenti. Many of them took time to testify on how TM had changed their lives for the better. Did I mention the surprise walk-ons by longtime meditators Howard Stern (who credited TM with saving his depressive mom’s life) and Jerry Seinfeld (who split sides with some Seinfeldian observations on movie theaters, public restrooms, and marriage)?

All of those performers (well, minus Stern and Seinfeld) came back out for McCartney’s encore, featuring Ringo on drums instead of vocals. Together they banged out Macca rarity “Cosmically Conscious” and Beatles classic “I Saw Her Standing There,” which rocked even harder than it did at this year’s Grammys. It was an impressive moment by any measure. I’ve never practiced any kind of meditation myself, and I’m not sure if the fervent testimonials, glossy pamphlets, and informational short films that the David Lynch Foundation lined up last night are likely to change that. But any movement that can bring that number and caliber of creative minds together must be doing something right.

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