The Music Mix Music news, reviews, albums, concerts, and downloads

Tag: Rock (91-100 of 495)

Myspace returns with new streaming capabilities, mobile app, and star-curated radio

Don’t look now, but Myspace is back — for real this time. The old social network is now Myspace (no capital S), a full-scale music destination designed to bring artists and fans together.

“When we bought it in 2011, it was so mismanaged, I don’t know what it was,” says Tim Vanderhook, who purchased Myspace with his brother Chris and now serves as its CEO. “But we bought Myspace to return it back to what it was so great at, which was a platform for creative expression, promotion, and discovery. We’ve talked a lot about Katy Perry, Bruno Mars, Adele, all these artists who were discovered on Myspace. They were able to promote themselves and put out their brand. When you look at the intersection between all three of those things, that’s what we were trying to get back to. Ultimately we want to make a home for artists.”

For a lot of people who were just getting into the music business during Myspace’s first wave, it’s a welcome return. “I really got my start on Myspace back in ’06,” superproducer and rapper Hit-Boy told EW. “I reached out to everybody I thought could help me, and then people started reaching out to me. I just kept it going, and I would put new music on my page all the time… A lot of people I met on myspace back in ’05 or ’06 I’m still friends with today.”

Several other high profile artists have already signed on. In addition to Justin Timberlake, who operates as the creative director and has an ownership stake in the company, Pharrell Williams, Kenna, Mac Miller, Iggy Azaela, Charli XCX, Ciara, Schoolboy Q, and a host of others have already gotten involved by posting special GIFs (Williams seems especially adept at this), showing up in videos, and programming radio stations for Myspace’s newly-launched mobile app. READ FULL STORY

Charts: Queens of the Stone Age have the number one album, Robin Thicke has the top song, Miley Cyrus' 'We Can't Stop' opens big

After a six year wait, a new label, and a car crash with an actress on a CW show, Josh Homme finds himself at number one for the first time. 

Queens of the Stone Age’s excellent new album …Like Clockwork debuted at number one on this week’s Billboard chart, moving 91,000 copies in its opening week. It’s the first chart-topper for the band, as well as the first number one for indie label Matador, also home to indie stalwarts like Cat Power, Pavement, and Guided by Voices. (The label’s previous high on the chart was Interpol’s self-titled debut, which bowed at no. 7 in 2002.) READ FULL STORY

Watch Fitz & the Tantrums perform 'MoneyGrabber' on 'Guitar Center Sessions' - EXCLUSIVE

fitz-and-the-tantrums.jpg

DirecTV’s original series Guitar Center Sessions has featured intimate live performances from some of the best names in rock, including Weezer, Jimmy Cliff, Joe Walsh, Smashing Pumpkins, Peter Frampton, Switchfoot, Megadeth, Ben Folds Five, and Jane’s Addiction.

The latest band to step into the arena (or more accurately, onto the small indoor stage) is Fitz & the Tantrums, who will be showcased on a new episode of Sessions this Friday, June 14 at 9 PM on channel 239. The Los Angeles neo-New Wavers just dropped their new album More Than Just a Dream, but the  highlight of their Guitar Center Sessions performance is the skronking “MoneyGrabber,” from their 2010 debut Pickin’ Up the Pieces.

Check out an exclusive performance of “MoneyGrabber” below.  READ FULL STORY

Nine Inch Nails' new single 'Came Back Haunted' arrives: Hear it here!

If you haven’t been getting enough Trent Reznor in your diet, you have no excuses.

Not only did Reznor’s band How to Destroy Angels put out a pretty great (and criminally overlooked) album earlier this year, Trent is also on the new Queens of the Stone Age album …Like Clockwork. But of course, most Reznorphiles were waiting for the official return of Nine Inch Nails, which has finally come in the form of the single “Came Back Haunted.”

The track, which surfaced last night as the download for those pre-ordering NIN’s new album Hesitation Marks, which will be released on September 3. Hesitation Marks is available for pre-order at iTunes now, and you can hear “Came Back Haunted” below.

READ FULL STORY

Scott Weiland countersues Stone Temple Pilots over music and name rights

Years ago when Guns N’ Roses (the original, Appetite For Destruction version) parted ways, there was a protracted legal argument that ended with frontman Axl Rose as the owner of the band’s name.

Several non-Axl members of GNR went on to form Velvet Revolver, and tapped Stone Temple Pilots singer Scott Weiland to provide vocal duties — and now Weiland himself is in a very similar battle with his old bandmates.

Just days after the other three members of STP—brothers Dean and Robert DeLeo and drummer Eric Kretz—sued Weiland in an attempt to get him to stop playing STP songs and using the STP name on tour, Weiland has filed a $7 million countersuit. He’s seeking that amount in damages and wants a judge to dissolve the band partnership.  READ FULL STORY

Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion get a little help from Wilco on 'Chairman Meow' -- EXCLUSIVE STREAM

Sarah-Lee-Guthrie-and-Johnny-Irion.jpg

Take Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion, add a guitar c/o of Jeff Tweedy, add one cat pun and some sunshine; shake well. Pour it out and you have “Chairman Meow,” one of 11 tracks from the duo’s upcoming fourth album, Wassaic Way (out Aug. 6), produced by Wilco’s Tweedy and Patrick Sansone. The song name-checks L.A. neighborhoods like Hancock Park, Miracle Mile, and Koreatown while paying ah-oooh tribute to the titular cat owner.

It is maybe almost too delightful. Stream it exclusively below.

READ FULL STORY

KROQ's annual Weenie Roast feat. the Black Keys, Vampire Weekend, Imagine Dragons and more: Watch the live stream here

You know what the worst part about summer music fests are? Not being able to attend them!

Luckily the friendly folks at KROQ, the L.A. radio station that throws their annual multi-band rock bonanza Weenie Roast every year in nearby Irvine, Calif., have found a way to let you be there without burning all you sick days (or your money): By streaming the whole festival live.

Slated performances include the Black Keys (pictured above), Vampire Weekend, Imagine Dragons, Jimmy Eat World, 30 Seconds to Mars, and more, this year’s Weenie Roast (now in its 21st year). Click below for the live stream and a full schedule (all times PDT) of the day’s performers, which will kick off with a preshow at noon PDT/3pm EST:

READ FULL STORY

Spacehog's Royston Langdon on getting the band back together, auditioning for Velvet Revolver, and one fateful motorcycle ride

If you remember 1995, you remember the neo-glam modern-rock radio smash “In the Meantime” — and the band that made it, the Langdon-brothers-helmed Spacehog.

After the breakout success of their debut, Resident Alien, the group followed with a critically-beloved cult classic, The Chinese Album, that failed to catch on commercially, and then The Hogyssey before going their separate ways. Along the way, they experimented with different bands, went over rocky personal paths (including frontman Royston Langdon’s marriage and subsequent divorce from actress Liv Tyler), and generally tried to find their way.

Now older and wiser but still obsessed with glam sweetness, Spacehog are back. They released their long-awaited fourth album As It Is on Earth last month, and they’re currently on the road in support of it. EW caught up with frontman Royston Langdon to discuss his long hiatus, how he nearly became the singer of Velvet Revolver, and how he feels about “In the Meantime” nearly two decades later.

Entertainment Weekly: The Hogyssey came out all the way back in 2001. How did Spacehog dissipate?
Royston Langdon: It was a lot of things. We’d spent a lot of time touring intensely for the first two or three years, after the release of Resident AlienThe Chinese Album came pretty easily and was a similar kind of experience to the first record, and it was pretty critically well-received but not so well-received commercially. So then we spent some time in the wilderness without a label. When we finally made The Hogyssey, there was a lot of creative differences with the label and within the group. I’ve never really been happy with that record, so touring that record in 2001 was hard work. We were pulling in all different directions, which is not good for a band. Our show final show was supposed to be on the eighth of September in 2011. READ FULL STORY

Tom Petty is the latest to get a dedicated SiriusXM station. Who else should get their own?

Beginning this Friday, May 17, Tom Petty will be getting not one but two new stations dedicated to his music on SiriusXM satellite radio.

One will feature an overview of Petty’s entire career, from his work with the Heartbreakers to his solo material and his stints with Mudcrutch and the Traveling Wilburys, available to SiriusXM subscribers on channel 111. It will be available until June 14.

The other will be dedicated to episodes of Petty’s show Tom Petty’s Buried Treasure, which airs every Thursday night on SiriusXM channel 27 and features Petty opening up his vaults and discussing deeper cuts from his huge catalog. Both stations will feature studio tracks and rarely heard live material, and Buried Treasure will air around the clock on SiriusXM Internet Radio.

Petty joins a select group of artists who have received their own station. The current lineup includes channels devoted solely to Bruce Springsteen, Elvis Presley, and Jimmy Buffet, while past special channels have been dedicated to Led Zeppelin, Paul McCartney, R.E.M., the Rolling Stones, Coldplay, ABBA, and Metallica. READ FULL STORY

Fall Out Boy's Patrick Stump on being back at No. 1, hanging with Elton John, and why he loves Shostakovich

Fall Out Boy hadn’t released an album in nearly five years, but that didn’t stop Save Rock and Roll from debuting at No. 1 a few weeks back.

Though they’ve reached that pinnacle before (the group’s 2007 album Infinity On High also debuted in the top spot), it remains a major accomplishment for a band whom many in the industry had dismissed as kings of a genre whose time had passed.

Still, frontman Patrick Stump isn’t letting it go to his head. “I think there’s a lot of outside pressure to be focused on [numbers], but we try to focus on making the music,” Stump says. “When you’re No. 1 or No. 300, you still get to play and write the songs.”

In an extended conversation with EW, Stump talks about the creation of Save Rock and Roll, what it’s like to work with Pete Wentz, and why Elton John knows more about music than just about anybody.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: What was the first song that came together for Save Rock and Roll?
PATRICK STUMP:
“Where Did the Party Go” was the first one. Pete and I had been throwing around a lot of ideas, and sometimes Pete speaks in really funny kind of riddles. That’s one of the classic things that used to frustrate me, when people would complain about our long song titles that don’t make any sense and don’t have any relation to the song. I always thought, “You need to talk to Pete Wentz, because when you hang out with him for 10 minutes, you realize that’s how that guy talks.” He threw this puzzle at me, and he wanted me to combine a whole bunch of songs and feelings that were so disparate. As a trained musician, I thought, “Those things literally can’t go together.” But in trying to do it, not only did I surprise myself, but he was going, “Yeah, that’s it!” It was the first song that felt like the band. It’s a great song and an important song to have on the record, but the most important thing is the story behind it because it was the song that really opened up the record for us. And there’s a hint of where we wanted to go on that, because it sounds a lot like old Fall Out Boy and nothing like old Fall Out Boy.

Your records have really evolved quite a bit over time, so what do you consider “old” Fall Out Boy?
One of the things we wanted to toy around with was taking those hallmarks that people identified with us and taking them out of the superficial definitions. People talk to me all the time about emo, and I have no problem with having been identified with that, but make no mistake, we never planned on being an emo band. That was never a talk that we had. When Pete got that haircut, it was just him doing his own weird thing.  Everything about it was kind of accidental. So there’s a temptation to focus on recapturing that spirit we had in 2003, and I can’t disagree with that, because that’s when the band discovered themselves. But I think we really tried to make a Fall Out Boy record without any of the genre involved. READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Music

Advertisement

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP