The Music Mix Music news, reviews, albums, concerts, and downloads

Tag: Rock (91-100 of 551)

Katy Perry, Lorde, Imagine Dragons all get early post-Grammys sales boosts

If Katy Perry is actually a witch, then she certainly cast the right spell on music buyers.

Though her performance during the 56th Annual Grammy Awards was met with mixed reviews (EW loved it; the rest of the Internet was more lukewarm), Perry has the biggest post-Grammys sales bump so far.

We won’t know which albums got the biggest spikes until next week (the sales numbers close Sunday night), though a number of songs—including Perry’s “Dark Horse,” featuring rapper Juicy J—have already seen noticeable increases following their appearance on Sunday night’s show.

“Dark Horse” has been on top of the iTunes singles chart all week, and it’s the number one song on Billboard‘s Digital Songs chart (which includes Monday’s sales) this week. It sold 294,000 downloads last week, up 12 percent from last week’s tally. That boost was enough to push “Dark Horse” into the number one spot on the Billboard Hot 100, which is Perry’s ninth trip to that plateau.

Other big gainers on the Billboard Digital Songs chart include Daft Punk’s “Get Lucky” (up 206 percent), John Legend’s “All Of Me” (a 110 percent gain), and Pink & Nate Ruess’ “Just Give Me a Reason” (a 122 percent boost). Imagine Dragons also got a jolt with the release of the Kendrick Lamar-assisted remix of “Radioactive,” which helped the song to a 58 percent sales gain.

It’ll be interesting to see who will see their album sales boosted by the Grammys, which were watched by nearly 30 million people. Daft Punk’s Random Access Memories will almost certainly see a giant bounce, as should Lorde’s Pure Heroine, Kacey Musgraves’ Same Trailer, Different Park, and Macklemore & Ryan Lewis’ The Heist. However, it’s entirely possible the biggest winner of the post-Grammys week could be 2014 Grammy Nominees, the compilation album that debuted at number two with 59,000 copies sold.

What music did you buy in the wake of the Grammys? Let us know in the comments.

Motley Crue call it quits (again), announce gigantic farewell tour

They say there are only two retirements that never stick: Rock stars and professional wrestlers.

OK, nobody actually says that, but it’s more or less true. The call of the road and the brightness of the lights is often too much to keep aging stars away, which is why we’re still watching Ozzy Osbourne play Black Sabbath songs and Ric Flair deliver chops.

The latest band to declare retirement is Motley Crue, who just announced that they were hanging it up following a massive farewell tour that is scheduled to kick off July 2 and run on and off for the next two years. Dubbed The Final Tour, the trek is signed in blood (kind of): Earlier today in Los Angeles, the group — Vince Neil, Mick Mars, Nikki Sixx, and Tommy Lee — signed a formal “Cessation of Touring Agreement” that says they are officially forbidden from hitting the road as of the end of 2015. “Everything must come to an end,” Lee said at the press conference announcing the tour. “We always had a vision of going out with a big f—ing bang and not playing county fairs and clubs with one or two original band members. Our job here is done!”

Of course, this isn’t the first time Motley Crue have called it quits. READ FULL STORY

Grammys Winner Snubs and Surprises: Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath steal, Kanye West and Kendrick Lamar get robbed

Last night, there was a tweet floating around the Internet that noted that Macklemore & Ryan Lewis had already amassed four Grammys and legendary artists like Tupac, Notorious B.I.G., Jimi Hendrix, the Beach Boys, and the Who have a grand total of zero among them.

The suggestion, of course, is that possessing an  an armload of Academy-issued gold sippy cups doesn’t necessarily have any real correlation to artistic greatness.

Still, that doesn’t mean there weren’t some head-scratching decisions and maddening snubs during last night’s telecast, most of which happened off-camera. As surprised as Taylor Swift was that Daft Punk won the Grammy for Album of the Year last night, the French duo’s victory can’t entirely be called an upset; though there were some mild surprises among the awards handed out live at the 56th Annual Grammy Awards, there wasn’t a single on-camera score that could be considered a true surprise of snub.

Luckily, there were dozens more awards given out before the televised show even started, and there lives a parade of outrage.  READ FULL STORY

How Kendrick Lamar (and Imagine Dragons) won the Grammys

Beloved stars hit their marks over and over on last night’s Grammys: Beyoncé pulled off a paradoxically classy chair dance, an ecstatic Pharrell led Daft Punk in a music nerdgasm with Stevie Wonder and Nile Rodgers, Lorde fully blew out her bedroom sound, and Macklemore & Ryan Lewis staged a mass wedding as corny and obvious and touching as any ceremony you’d share with family.

And then there was Kendrick Lamar. Although he’s beloved among rap fans and recognized as an indefatigable performer at festivals and opening for Kanye West, the Academy reminded us that Kendrick’s just not the type they want to celebrate, awarding him zero Grammys, not even for Best Rap Album. Macklemore—in his own words—”robbed” that one from Kendrick.

Nor did Kendrick merely hit his marks when it came time for him to perform. Instead, he offered up his own reminder of just how wily and amorphous he is compared to virtually any other artist competing, even in futility, in any kind of industry popularity contest. Rather than simply come out and rap, maybe surrounded by a set evoking his hometown of Compton or with a guest rapper who once managed to find the Academy’s favor, he teamed up with Imagine Dragons, one of rock’s most successful and least acclaimed bands, to try and reinvent a smash (“Radioactive”) that has already worn a groove in pop’s collective consciousness. (Plus perform part of his own ”m.A.A.D City.”)

READ FULL STORY

Grammy finale: Nine Inch Nails, Queens of the Stone Age, Dave Grohl, and Lindsey Buckingham to close out the show

Last year, the Grammy Awards closed with a bizarre LL Cool J-led parade that was ostensibly a tribute to the late Beastie Boy Adam “MCA” Yauch, but was mostly a mess of nü-metal noise.

This Sunday, the end of the broadcast promises to be infinitely better thanks to a scheduled super group featuring Nine Inch Nails, Queens of the Stone Age, Dave Grohl, and Fleetwood Mac’s Lindsey Buckingham. They’re hardly strangers going into the show, of course: Nine Inch Nails and Queens of the Stone Age are heading out on tour together in Australia; Grohl played drums on several QOTSA albums; QOTSA frontman Josh Homme collaborated with Trent Reznor on a track for Grohl’s Sound City documentary, which also featured Buckingham; and Buckingham played guitars on a few tracks on NIN’s Hesitation Marks.

Several of those members could also be newly minted Grammy winners by the time they hit the stage. READ FULL STORY

Bruce Springsteen's new album 'High Hopes' making its debut on 'The Good Wife,' to stream at CBS.com -- EW chats with the show's creators

Plenty of artists are previewing their albums via iTunes, but Bruce Springsteen is about to become the first to unveil his new work at the law offices of Florrick & Agos.

Springsteen’s upcoming album High Hopes, set for release on Jan. 14, will be streaming in its entirety on CBS.com. The album will be available following this Sunday’s brand-new episode of The Good Wife, which will feature snippets of songs from the new album during the preview for the Jan. 12 episode, which will prominently feature three of the tracks from High Hopes: “The Ghost of Tom Joad,” “Hunter Of Invisible Game,” and “High Hopes.”

The stream of Springsteen’s High Hopes will be available on CBS.com/Springsteen through Monday night, Jan. 13 at 7 p.m. ET — just in time for the album to go on sale to the public the following morning.

For The Good Wife creators and hardcore Springsteen fans Robert and Michelle King, this is the perfect arrangement. READ FULL STORY

On the scene: Prince electrifies the Mohegan Sun Arena

Over the course of his long, storied, and downright weird career, Prince has proven he can make just about any room his home—from the teeny (dig his epic sets at New York’s tiny City Winery earlier this year) to the gargantuan (he played the greatest Super Bowl halftime show of the modern era in 2007—sorry, Beyoncé).

But the Purple One’s ideal stomping ground is an arena, which he proved yet again Friday night (December 27) when he stampeded through the first of three shows at the Mohegan Sun Arena in Uncasville, Connecticut. Those rooms are intimate enough for Prince to individually invite women onto the stage to dance with him, but also large enough to contain his royal histrionics.

Decked out in an all-yellow suit and situated behind a microphone stand bearing the glyph that once stood in place of his name, Prince treated the first night of his three-night stay like an old-school soul review. “We’re just gonna jam tonight,” he told the crowd while introducing the New Power Generation, and he lived up to his word. The early part of Prince’s two and a half hour set featured him teasing out extra-long versions of staples both classic (“Let’s Go Crazy”) and modern (“Musicology”), and vacillating between being a living avatar of James Brown and the greatest descendent of Jimi Hendrix.

The most remarkable thing about seeing Prince live is the fact that the guy is a ridiculously great guitar player (or, as one bearded dude said to another during the solo that highlighted “Something In the Water (Does Not Compute),” “That motherf—er can shred!”). His guitar heroics showed up early and often, especially on the slowed-down, Zeppelin-ized version of “Let’s Go Crazy.”

When he wasn’t melting his six-string, he was holding court as the ringmaster of a sprawling funk band whose numbers seemed to keep multiplying (there were at least 18 other musicians on stage). READ FULL STORY

Best and Worst 2013: The six best metal albums of the year

Ghost-BC.jpg

There’s a scene in the also-ran ’90s teen film Empire Records where one of the titular music store’s employees sorts through the CDs snatched by a just-caught shoplifter. The clerk is appalled that said juvenile criminal would only be jacking rap and metal and encourages him to listen to some jazz.

The passive suggestion in that scene is that obsession over those genres is best suited to 14-year-olds who haven’t yet grown out of their age of aggression. If that’s true, then I am undoubtedly regressing, as I spent roughly 79 percent of 2013 listening to fantastically guttural hip-hop and ultra-intense metal.

Luckily, metal’s constant shape-shifting and envelope-pushing provide a multitude of approaches and attitudes. The six albums listed below all fall under the heading of “metal,” but no two are the same. The only thing they share is a fundamental intensity that taps into something pure and primal. This year wasn’t as great a year as 2012, when stalwarts Baroness, Converge, High on Fire, and Gojira all hit remarkable peaks. But there was still plenty of shredding majesty and genuflections before darkness.

So enjoy my picks for the six (the most evil number) best metal albums of 2013. Apologies to Watain, Skeletonwitch, Kvelertak, Tombstoned, Amon Amarth, Ancient VVisdom, and Avatarium, all of whom made metal records I loved and just missed the cut for the top. Try ‘em all, and play ‘em loud.  READ FULL STORY

Best and Worst 2013: The Worst Albums of the Year, starring Lil Wayne, Five Finger Death Punch, and John Fogerty

Let’s face it: Outside of a few exceptions, the bulk of the music that came out this year (or any given year) falls into the “pretty much okay” category. It takes a remarkable feat to cross the bridge from “merely disappointing” or “aggressively sub par” over to “truly, remarkably heinous.”

Which is to say: The five albums listed below aren’t merely boring or trite or annoying (though they are in fact all of those things). Each of the five long-players below had to go the extra mile. As many have taught us in the past, it takes quite a bit of work to be this terrible.

So here are EW’s picks for the five worst albums of 2013. They are all terrible. Let us never speak of them again. READ FULL STORY

Grammy nomination snubs and surprises: Justin Timberlake, Sara Bareilles, Lorde and more

The nominations for the Grammy Awards always seem to lead to more arguments than any other music awards shows’ choices do. That’s inevitable, since the Grammys’ list of categories is so vast and sometimes confusing, and the criteria by which the nominating committee settles on its selections is often inexplicable.

The announcement of the list of potential Grammy winners last night was no different, and it starts at the top: Jay Z lead all artists with nine total nominations, even though his 2013 release Magna Carta…Holy Grail was considered tepid at best (an adjudication Jigga himself seems to share). What’s even stranger is that none of those nine nominations are in the Big Three categories: Song of the Year, Album of the Year, and Record of the Year. He also shares a couple of those nominations with Justin Timberlake for “Suit & Tie.” So Jay taking home the most nominations is a little deceptive — it’s not like the year Adele scored a boatload of nods and then dominated the proceedings.

That’s only the beginning. Here are nine more confusing snubs and pleasant surprises embedded within the Grammy nominations.

Surprise: Justin Timberlake
Weep not for JT; he picked up seven nominations across a multitude of categories, including Best Pop Duo/Group Performance.

READ FULL STORY

Latest Videos in Music

Advertisement

From Our Partners

TV Recaps

Powered by WordPress.com VIP