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Tag: Rock (11-20 of 551)

An unlikely gang parties hard in Sneakout's 'The Art of Hanging On' video

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As a wise man once said, “Parents just don’t understand.” Grandparents can be another story. Like if your parents are fun-hating control freaks, they might round up a pack of fellow old folks and head out into the streets of L.A. for a night of mischief and kid-friendly partying, perhaps picking up some hot friends along the way.

That’s the lesson of the video for “The Art of Hanging On” by L.A. artist Robert Fleming, a.k.a. Sneakout, who you may have recently heard on Girls. Directed by Andrew Hines, who’s also shot for A$AP Ferg and The Head and The Heart, the clip gives a comedic spin to Fleming’s psychedelically embellished, New Wave-inflected electro-rock. The song’s available on Fleming’s new Letting Go mixtape. If you’re in L.A., you can catch him opening for EW favorite Lowell at Bootleg HiFi on Sept. 22.

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Watch the trailer for the lost Doors film 'Feast of Friends'

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It’s become a cliche of pop music that at a certain point in their career, a popular enough act will have to make a movie about themselves in order to give their audience an “unguarded” (but in reality heavily mediated) look at their life offstage. But when the Doors decided to self-produce their own film in 1968, it was still a fairly novel idea. That film, entitled Feast of Friends, was never officially released, although clips of it have been used in documentaries and music videos, and bootleg copies have been passed from Doors fan to Doors fan for years. In fact it came close to being a quite literally lost project—rumor has it that those bootlegs were all duplicates of a print that Jim Morrison left in a paper bag at a friend’s house just days before he died.

Now, Feast of Friends is finally getting a proper release by Eagle Rock Entertainment on Nov. 11. The DVD/Blu-Ray edition includes not only a complete cut of the film but a companion compilation of outtakes called Feast of Friends: Encore, plus a 1968 Doors doc produced for British television called The Doors Are Open, as well as a 1967 performance of filmed for a Canadian TV pop-music variety show where they drop a full 10-minute version of “The End” on a group of stunned Torontonians.

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Music supervisor for 'Revenge,' 'Arrow,' and 'The Fault In Our Stars' makes us a fall TV playlist

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The most important movie soundtrack this year was undoubtedly the top-shelf compilation put together by Season Kent for The Fault In Our Stars, and not just because it gave us Charli XCX’s inimitable “Boom Clap.” Kent has quickly become one of the go-to names in music supervision, and though she’s working on more and more film projects (she just got started working on the Magic Mike sequel), she has primarily made her bones on television.

This season, she returns to both Arrow and Revenge, and adds the brand new Arrow spin-off The Flash to her portfolio. In an effort to give our Shazam apps a rest during the forthcoming TV season, we asked Kent to make us a playlist of songs that we’ll eventually be hearing under our favorite dramatic moments and montages. Check out her picks and listen to the Spotify playlist below.

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Love it or loathe it? Two EW critics debate U2's new album 'Songs of Innocence'

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Yesterday, U2—easily the biggest rock band left on the planet—surprised everyone when they released their long-in-gestation new album for free.

Songs of Innocence was made available to everybody with an iTunes account, which allows most everybody who listens to digital music to hear it; a physical version will be out on October 14, at which point it will be eligible to chart.

After a solid 12 hours of digesting the record — their first since 2010’s generally disappointing No Line on the Horizon — EW music experts Kyle Anderson and Miles Raymer fired up their e-mail machines, and their critical judgment.  READ FULL STORY

Arum Rae delivers danceable, frills-free rock on 'Let's Shake'

When Berklee-trained singer-songwriter Arum Rae was being courted by a major label last year, the former Austin, Texas resident (currently located in Brooklyn) booked recording time for a demo with Jim Eno, the drummer and producer for Spoon who helped develop the punchy, minimalist aesthetic that’s become one of that band’s defining characteristics. The deal never came through, and Rae is now presenting the demos as an EP (her second this year) of “lost” recordings.

Waving Wild comes out Nov. 4. Its lead single, “Let’s Shake,” is a bracing, stripped-down, full-speed-ahead reminder that, oh yeah, rock ‘n’ roll is dance music at heart.

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Nick Cave talks to EW about his new movie '20,000 Days on Earth' and why he doesn't like meeting his heroes

Over the course of a nearly four-decade music career, Nick Cave has been one of music’s most reliably inscrutable rock stars. The forthcoming documentary 20,000 Days on Earth (in theaters September 19) does a bit to shed some light on Cave’s dark spirit, but it does it with a twist.

Although many of the day-in-the-life conversations aren’t scripted (or very loosely so), and everybody in Cave’s life—from bandmate Warren Ellis to former Bad Seed Blixa Bargeld to Kylie Minogue—plays him- or herself, a lot of the film is built on artifice. The office where Cave undergoes a therapy session, the “archive” where he goes to review old photographs—they’re all built sets and faked scenarios, and constructed to try to wring some truth out of something inherently fake.

20,000 Days on Earth splits its time between those scenes and in-the-studio footage from the sessions that led to Push the Sky Away, Cave’s 2013 record with the Bad Seeds. It’s a remarkable movie, existing in the unique dimension between fiction and reality straddled by filmmaking greats like Werner Herzog and Errol Morris: READ FULL STORY

Travel back to the late '90s with Puff Daddy's Smashing Pumpkins remix

The mid-to-late ’90s were a pretty weird time for music. Hip-hop, alternative rock, and dance music all found themselves suddenly, unexpectedly elevated from underground styles to the top of the pop charts, and it inspired a lot of musicians working in one of those styles to reach out to artists in the others. While today we take this sort of cross-genre collaboration for granted, at the time it was a fairly new concept. And as with most new concepts, there was a period where everyone was trying to figure out exactly what to do with it, resulting in a lot of awkward moments captured on tape.

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Hear Larkin Poe's stomping roots-pop single 'Don't'

Larkin Poe is a duo from Atlanta comprised of sisters Rebecca and Megan Lovell and named for a distant relative who was himself distantly related to Edgar Allen Poe. The sisters share an infatuation with roots sounds, frequently incorporating traditional song structures and instruments like the mandolin and Dobro into their music, but they also boast strong pop instincts. On Oct. 14, they’ll release their new album, Kin, in Restoration Hardware stores, with a broader release a week later. The first single, “Don’t,” pulls from rock’s earliest days, mixing it with a stomping glam rock beat and a country-inflected pop melody.

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Ty Segall talks about his new album and his work habits

In the span of just a few years, Ty Segall has put out seven albums, a handful of collaborative LPs, and so many singles, guest appearances, compilation tracks, and assorted other releases that even he’s probably lost count. His latest, Manipulator, was released this past Tuesday, almost exactly a year after his last album, Sleeper, a deeply personal and largely acoustic record about fraught family relationships. The new one finds him back in full-on rock mode, exploding with a generous amount of sweet hooks and heavy guitar riffing, and is equally capable of satisfying pop fans and van-driving, dope-smoking hard rockers alike.

In the lead-up to Manipulator’s release, EW got Segall on the phone to talk about the album, its inspiration, and how he manages to stay so prolific.

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Delta Spirit debut their sweeping video for 'From Now On'

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Delta Spirit have a talent for recreating the feel of classic rock styles–particularly the more psychedelic ones–without sticking too closely to their aesthetic playbooks, which is a remarkable quality in a rock scene that often seems to have traded innovation for making the most accurate emulations possible of sounds from the genre’s past. The lead single from their upcoming fourth album, Into the Wide (out Sept. 9 on Dualtone Records), has a widescreen scope but is still packed with hooks, especially in the searing bent-note lead that soars over the composition.

For the video, director Andrew Bruntel goes for a similarly epic sweep, with a disparate cast of characters living very diferent lives on the prairies of southeastern Colorado. “If I could parse it down to one simple theme,” he writes, “it would be vulnerability. Vulnerability in friendships, in our relationships with family and with the pets/animals that we allow into our lives.” It’s gorgeous and triumphant and sad all at the same time, much like the song itself.

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